Tips | Find publishing details for Shodhganga search results

e.g. search for “Shodhganga endangered language”, “Shodhganga Adivasi”, “Shodhganga Santal”, “Shodhganga Tribal education”, “Shodhganga forest rights”, “Shodhganga Nilgiri tribe”, “Shodhganga vulnerable tribal group”, “Shodhganga tribal music” in the present search window:

Tracking missing publishing details for any search result

  1. to trace the source document of any separate chapter listed among the search results hosted on Shodhganga’s server, copy its “handle” number from the search results: e.g. 10603/18137” from the URL provided for a PDF titled “Conclusion” (without the author’s name or other publishing details):
    http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/18137/12/12_conclusion.pdf
  2. copy-paste the same “handle” number (10603/18137) Shodhganga’s website in order to trace the document’s publishing data and download links for the remaining chapters: http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in
    i.e. the following thesis: Music, literature and representations of culture : a study of tangkhul naga tribe in ukhrul district 
  3. for advanced search directly consult the Shodhganga website here:
    http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in:8080/jspui/subject-search 

About Shodhganga

The Shodhganga@INFLIBNET Centre provides a platform for research students to deposit their Ph.D. theses and make it available to the entire scholarly community in open access.

Source:  Shodhganga
URL: http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in
Date visited:  11 December 2018

To learn more about this custom search engine, click here >>

 

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Native Knowledge 360°: An initiative to inspire and promote improvement of teaching and learning about American Indians – USA

Native Knowledge 360° by the National Museum of the American Indian’s to inspire and promote improvement of teaching and learning about American Indians >>

Do you remember the first time YOU learned about American Indians?

If you are like most Americans, you probably received only a tiny glimpse into the rich and diverse cultures, histories, and contemporary lives of Native peoples.

You may have even learned some things that were limited, false, or misleading.

During my childhood, for example, we learned that American history began with European settlement of the “New World”—a vast wilderness populated only by a few wandering hunter-gatherers.

The messages from popular culture were equally clear. Contemporary Indians were not relevant. Indians were figures of the past.

Today, misrepresentations about Native people often remain unchallenged in the educational system and culture of the United States.

It isn’t because teachers don’t care. It’s because many teachers and students just don’t have the information or resources to provide deeper and more comprehensive knowledge and perspectives.

That’s why the National Museum of the American Indian is joining with Native communities and educators to develop a web-based educational initiative called Native Knowledge 360° that will help change the way American Indian histories, cultures, and contemporary lives are taught in K–12 classrooms (you can learn more about it here).

Source: email from Kevin Gover (Pawnee), Director
National Museum of the American Indian
31 January 2018

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“The Melodies of the Banam: One of the ancient musical instruments of the Santals” (Museum Day 2018) – West Bengal

Banam (Santal instrument)

Banams at the Museum of Santal Culture

Date and venue
9th December 2018 at 2:30 pm, at Museum of Santal Culture, Bishnubati, Birbhum

Chief Guest
Dr. Ratan Soren, Head, Dept. of Santali & Member, Centre for Adivasi Studies and Museum, Vidyasagar University, Medinipur

Guests of Honour

  • Prof. Ranjana Roy, Formerly Dept. of Anthropology, Calcutta University
  • Dr. Doneshwar Manjhi, Head, Dept. of Santali, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan
  • Mr. Som Murmu, Traditional Banam makers and player, Bekajol, Birbhum
  • Ms. Duli Hembrom, Dept. of Santali, Vidyasagar University
  • Prof. Debasis K. Mondal, Dept. of Anthropology, Calcutta University

Highlights of the Celebration

  1. Official Presentation of the BANAMS, produced from the Banam workshop conducted in Bishnubati in collaboration with the Museum of Cultural History (MCH), Oslo, Norway
  2. Musical Presentation with Banams (solo and group) by traditional banam makers from Birbhum and Purulia.
  3. Rarely performed Santali Songs: Balaya sereng, Jawai/Bahu eger sereng, Gai jagao sereng by the elders of Bishnubati and Ashadullapur.
  4. Santal dances by RSV students and village youths.
  5. Presentation on ‘Karam Binti’ (Santal mythology) by Karam Guru Rabon Baskey and his team from Murgabuni, Birbhum.
  6. Santal play by junior leaders of Ghosaldanga and Bishnubati.

Contact

Ramjit Mardi-8670244810; Bimol Baski- 8116142104; Bhabini Baski-9932250251 and Boro Baski- 9002188716

Email – <borobaski@gmail.com> and <bams.sec@gmail.com>

Since its inception in 2007, the ‘Museum of Santal Culture’ mainly served as a community centre. With assistance of the Tribal Cultural Heritage in India Foundation (Amsterdam) it was able to organize workshops for flute making, drum playing, photography from 2011 onward; and also publish children’s books, audio and video albums on the life of the villages – captured by local children – before producing the present catalogue.

The development of the Museum of Santal Culture was taken to the next level at Oslo, during the Bodding Symposium 2015, by tying up with the prestigious ‘Museum of Cultural History’ (Norway). This bond was further strengthened by Prof. Øivind Fuglerud and Dr. Anne Habu Karin during their visit the Museum of Santal Culture in September-October 2017.

As a  follow-up, Dr. Tone Bleie (Professor Public Planning and Cultural Understanding at the Arctic University Tromsø, Norway and co-organizer of the 2015 Symposium), visited together with Prof. Øivind Fuglerud. This provided our visitors with a welcome opportunity to jointly celebrate the International Museum Day at Bishnubation 9th December together with members of local communities.

Source: photos and information courtesy Dr. Boro Baski (by email)

Slideshow | International Museum Day 2017 on the occasion of its 4th Museum Day

Celebration of Santal Culture and Tradition on 9th December 2017 at Museum of Santal Culture, Bishnubati, Birbhum

Chief Guest

Prof. Tone Bleie, Dept. of Sociology, University of Tromso, Norway
Head, The Scandinavian-Santal Heritage Initiative (SSInherit)

Guests of Honour

  1. Dr. Doneshwar Manjhi, Head, Dept. of Santali, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan
  2. Prof. Kumkum Bhattacharya, Dept. of Social Work, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan
  3. Dr. Maroona Murmu, Dept. of History, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  4. Prof. Ranjit Kr. Bhattacharya, Former Director, Anthropological Survey of India
  5. Mr. Ram Kisku, Eminent Santali singer, Dogachi, Dakhin Dinajpur
  6. Prof. Sanchayan Ghosh, Kala Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan

Highlights of the Programme

  • Presentation of new items in the museum and their presentation
  • Talk on the ‘The Importance of Santal Culture and Tradition in the Modern World’
  • Solo songs with instrumental accompaniment  of six major  festivals  (Baha, Sorhai, Eroh, Harier Sim, Jathar and Dasai)
  • Rarely performed Santali Songs -Balaya sereng, Jawai/Bahu eger sereng, Gai jagao sereng
  • Rarely performed Santal dances: Baha, Dom don, Karam, Danta don, Dasai, Sarpa eneh, Chadar badani
  • A photo exhibition on Santal life and culture captured during 1900s and in the present century.
  • Santali traditional musical programme

International museum day is celebrated every year by  on 18 May each year or around this date

The objective of International Museum Day (IMD) is to raise awareness of the fact that, “Museums are an important means of cultural exchange, enrichment of cultures and development of mutual understanding, cooperation and peace among peoples.” | Learn more >>

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Factors for a better life: An analysis of rural poverty and improvements for tribal communities – Chhattisgarh, Kerala, Maharashtra & Mizoram

It is possible to have a better life for Scheduled Tribes in India!

Read the full post by Prof. V. Santhakumar  >>

[…] The relative backwardness of scheduled tribes may not disappear through the overall development of a state and that may require special efforts. This is evident from the situation in the state of Kerala. Rural poverty among STs in the state is more than two-and-a-half times of that among its rural population as a whole[1].

However, the life of Scheduled Tribes in certain parts of India is relatively better. The state of Mizoram and other states in North-East India are one such case. What has enabled the human development of ST population in North-East India (compared to other parts of the country) is an interesting question and we will discuss that in another essay. […]

The relative improvement in Gadichiroli becomes clearer when we note the situation in the adjoining districts of Dantewada and Bastar in the state of Chhattisgarh.

Our short-period field work in the northern blocks of Gadchiroli district (Kurkheda and Korchi) in December 2017 also indicate a relatively better situation there. Tribal families use traditional methods to construct hygienic and comfortable houses. They have access to electricity and drinking water. Households have constructed toilets and there are no visible signs of open defecation. Almost all children go to primary school (located mostly within the village), though there is dropping out after completing 10th grade. There are boys and girls from these hamlets who pursue graduate and post-graduate education. The discussions with people there confirm that there is no serious issue of food poverty, and this could be due to the access to land and also the functioning of the public distribution system. Almost all households have land and these could be of reasonable size (3-5 hectares). Since these hamlets are surrounded by forests, the agricultural land is fertile and can be used for one cropping of paddy cultivation. However, their main source of income is through the collection and sale of Non-Timber Forest Products, facilitated through the community rights under the so called `Forest Rights Act’. […]

Though the institution of Forest Rights Act is a policy action on the part of governments, local mobilisation among Tribal population, and non-governmental organisations have played an important role in its effective implementation. This area has witnessed different forms of social mobilization under leaders coming from tribal communities. […]

Bamboo plantations were developed through the collective action in the community forest area. Bamboo is an important source of income for the tribal population, and a process of harvesting without replantation may work against the sustainability of this income.  Hence planning and implementing a project for bamboo harvesting and cultivation are important for the sustained welfare of the population here.

In summary, relatively better human development indicators of the tribal population in the northern bock of Gadchiroli district seem to be shaped by the social and political activism of the tribal leaders and the constructive work and the capacity building of organisations such as Amhi Amchya Arogyasathi. […]

V Santhakumar, a Professor at Azim Premji University [Bangalore], writes on contemporary or real world issues with a lens of economics or social sciences. He teaches economics for development practitioners in the university, and carries out research on education and development issues. His details can be seen in http://azimpremjiuniversity.edu.in/SitePages/v-santhakumar.aspx

Source: https://vsanthakumar.wordpress.com/2018/05/04/it-is-possible-to-have-a-better-life-for-scheduled-tribes-in-india/
Accessed: 4 May 2018

The Lonely Battle of the Indian Farmer
by Vinay Lal, December 6, 2018

[…] Volume Two of the Fifth and Final Report of the Swaminathan Commission commences with two epigrams, one from Gandhi—“To those who are hungry, God is bread”—and the other from Nehru:  “Everything else can wait, but not agriculture.”  The majority of Indian farmers and members of their households have only two meals a day, and at least 10% have only one meal a day.  That those whose labour helps put the food on the tables in the country’s towns and cities should not have enough food for themselves is particularly odious and cruelly ironic.  The indisputable fact is that a third of the world’s malnourished children live in India, just as it is clear that the problem is not one of scarcity but rather of accessibility to food. | Read the full blog post >>

(Vinay Lal is a writer, blogger, cultural critic, and Professor of History at UCLA.)

Source: Lal Salaam: A Blog by Vinay Lal
URL: https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/the-lonely-battle-of-the-indian-farmer/
Date visited:  6 December 2018

M S Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) established in 1988 is a not-for-profit trust. MSSRF was envisioned and founded by Professor M S Swaminathan, agriculture scientist with proceeds from the First World Food Prize that he received in 1987. The Foundation aims to accelerate use of modern science for sustainable agricultural and rural development. MSSRF focuses specifically on tribal and rural communities with a pro-poor, pro-women and pro-nature approach. The Foundation applies appropriate science and technology options to address practical problems faced by rural populations in agriculture, food and nutrition.

Source: Harnessing Science for Sustainable Development: About MSSRF
URL: http://www.mssrf.org
Date visited:  6 December 2018

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Posted in Anthropology, Bastar, Central region, Commentary, Community facilities, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Health and nutrition, Homes and utensils, Maps, Misconceptions, Modernity, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty, Seven Sister States, Southern region, Success story, Video resources - external, Western region | Comments Off on Factors for a better life: An analysis of rural poverty and improvements for tribal communities – Chhattisgarh, Kerala, Maharashtra & Mizoram

Giving ‘voice’ to Adivasi communities in India and inspiring projects in other states: Bhasha Research and Publication Centre – Gujarat

bhasha-archives-website-screenshot

Bhasha Research and Publication Centre was founded in 1996 with the purpose of giving ‘voice’ to Adivasi communities in India. The Adivasi Academy is founded by Bhasha at Tejgadh in Chhotaudepur district of Gujarat as an institute to combine the functions of the national academies, museums and literary bodies in the country, with respect to Adivasi culture, arts and literature. Over the years, the Adivasi communities with whom Bhasha has been actively involved, have voiced themselves through various spaces and mediums as arts, theatre, publishing, journalism and cultural activism.

Bhasha has an extensive collection of audio-visual documentation being presented here in form of a free online resource created under the Scheme of Center of Excellence, Ministry of Tribal Affairs, Government of India, for the study of Adivasis of India.

Source: Welcome to Bhasha Research Archival Website
Address: http://www.bhashaarchival.org/
Date Visited: Sun Nov 12 2017 12:46:45 GMT+0100 (CET)

Artists, DJs in cities latching on to tribal songs

Jay Pachchigar, Times of India, 13 October 2017 | To read the full article, click here >>

[…] The centre made 1,000 CDs of the audio songs and distributed them for free among the truck drivers, local shops, bus stands and other places. But, these songs have also been picked up by mainstream artists due to which they are now being heard in urban areas as well.

“The communities have songs for all occasions, festivals and seasons and these were passed on orally. We documented these songs so that it can reach a larger society. This has started happening since past few years,” said Vikesh Rathwa, museum assistant of BHASHA at Tejgadh in Chhota Udepur.

Not only the mainstream artists, but even the DJs, who play in the city during weddings and festival processions, helped in taking the songs to a larger audience,” he added. “The style of music was changed by them but the lyrics are same which is more important as these are sung in different tribal dialects,” said Rathwa. The folk songs used to be played during Navratri in the tribal regions, but these are now also being played at big venues in big cities like Vadodara, Surat and Ahmedabad.

The centre had initiated the project under the Central for Excellence scheme of Union ministry of tribal affairs. “Artists from Gamit, Rathwa, Chaudhary and other tribal communities of Panchmahal and Chhota Udepur had come together and recorded the songs,” Rathwa said. After the project in Gujarat became successful, the centre undertook a similar project in Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Chhatisgarh, Assam, Kerala, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand.

Source: Artists, DJs in cities latching on to tribal songs | Vadodara News – Times of India
Address: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/vadodara/artists-djs-in-cities-latching-on-to-tribal-songs/articleshow/61059543.cms
Date Visited: Sun Nov 12 2017 13:01:21 GMT+0100 (CET)

Mahasweta Devi memorial unveiled in Tejgadh

Times of India, 4 February 2017 | To read the full article and view a photograph of the memorial, click here >>

VADODARA: A memorial dedicated to eminent author and tribal rights activist late Mahasweta Devi was unveiled at the Adivasi Academy at Tejgadh on January 31. The memorial was unveiled by retired IAS Vibha Puri Das, chairperson of the Vadodara-based Bhasha Research and Publication Centre, which manages the academy. Other trustees of Bhasha including professor Kanji Patel, Dr Joseph Bara, Dr Madan Meena, Sandhya Gajjar attended the function which saw presence of Bhasha’s founders – Dr Ganesh Devy and Dr Surekha Devi as special guests.  Magsaysay award winner Mahasweta Devi had passed away in July last year. As a trustee and later a mentor to Bhasha Research and Publication Centre and the Adivasi Academy at Tejgadh, she used to visit Vadodara and Tejgadh quite often from 1998 till 2012, after which she fell ill and could not travel across the country from Kolkata.

Her wish was to be buried at the Adivasi Academy and in keeping with that wish, her family had offered Bhasha a ‘kalash’ with her mortal remains. The memorial was designed by architect Karan Grover, who has also designed the main building at the Adivasi Academy and it was constructed by local mason Ramesh Rathwa. […]

Source: Mahasweta Devi memorial unveiled in Tejgadh | Vadodara News – Times of India
Address: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/vadodara/mahasweta-devi-memorial-unveiled-in-tejgadh/articleshow/56962262.cms
Date Visited: Sun Nov 12 2017 12:57:16 GMT+0100 (CET)

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