Tribal population displaced in the Narmada valley

Ever since the Narmada Control Authority in its Action Taken Report permitted the raising of the Sardar Sarovar dam to 110.64 metres, the entire tribal belt in the Narmada valley came under the submergence zone. The scale of devastation during this monsoon will depend on the extent of rainfall here.

Read more in Frontline: “Flood of fears
Volume 21 – Issue 16, Jul. 31 – Aug. 13, 2004
India’s National Magazine
from the publishers of THE HINDU
Address : <http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/fl2116/stories/20040813002609400.htm>
Date Visited: Thu Jul 07 2011 10:04:37 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Learn more about tribal communities in the Narmada region >>

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On the need for counselling and rehabiliting victims of human trafficking: Ranchi-based Asha Kiran “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – Jharkhand

Plenary Session 5: Human Trafficking in Tribal India: A Focus on Jharkhand

Presented by: Sister Gemma Toppo, Ursuline Convent, Ranchi, Jharkhand

Chaired by: Dr. Ivy Imogene Hansdak, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi

Sister Gemma Toppo, founder-member of the Ranchi-based NGO, Asha Kiran, Ranchi, and recipient of the Jharkhand Samaan 2015, began the session by reflecting upon her NGO that rescues young girls from the network of human trafficking. The enriching presentation enlightened the audience regarding the varied nuances, purposes and effects of human trafficking. The victims of this human trade suffer life-long impact of marginalization and they require proper counselling and rehabilitation. The talk provided insights into the difference between migration and trafficking, and the way human trafficking is modern-day slavery. Sister Gemma Toppo has been instrumental in the rescue of these girls and their rehabilitation in her NGO. Through her work, she has been able to provide new hope to the survivors of human trade by teaching them various skills so that they could live their lives independently.

(Student Rapporteur: Ms. Rajitha Venugopal)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

Source: Report for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative organised by The Department of English & Outreach Programme Jamia Millia Islamia (New Delhi, 27-28 February 2017)

Courtesy Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 4 October 2017)

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Posted in Childhood and children, Community facilities, Eastern region, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Literature - fiction, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Rural poverty, Storytelling, Success story, Women | Comments Off on On the need for counselling and rehabiliting victims of human trafficking: Ranchi-based Asha Kiran “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – Jharkhand

In honour of the inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures, their ways of relating to people and the environment: International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2019 celebrated in the Western Ghats – Tamil Nadu

Environmental educator Davidson Sargunam with Kaani volunteers at Mookaraikal

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples celebrated by Kaani indigenous people

Nagercoil

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples was celebrated by Kaani indigenous people at Mookaraikal Tribal settlement in Kanyakumari in the Western Ghats.

Addressing the tribal people S Davidson Sargunam, environmental educator said that to create awareness of the needs of the Indigenous peoples, every 9 August commemorates the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, chosen in recognition of the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations held in Geneva in 1982.

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world, living across 90 countries. They make up less than 5 per cent of the world’s population, but account for 15 per cent of the poorest. They speak an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and represent 5,000 different cultures.

Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. They have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live. In spite of their cultural differences, indigenous peoples from around the world share common problems related to the protection of their rights as distinct peoples.

Indigenous peoples have sought recognition of their identities, their way of life and their right to traditional lands, territories and natural resources for years, yet throughout history their rights have always been violated. Presently indigenous peoples are arguably among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of people in the world. The international community now recognizes that special measures are required to protect their rights and maintain their distinct cultures and way of life.

This year’s observance is dedicated to Indigenous Peoples’ Languages in view of 2019 being marked as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. The large majority of the languages in danger are spoken by indigenous peoples. It is estimated that, every two weeks, an indigenous language disappears, placing at risk the respective indigenous cultures and knowledge systems. That is why, on the International Day, the goal is to draw attention to the critical loss of indigenous languages and the urgent need to preserve, revitalize and promote them at both national and international levels.

According to the data of the UN, indigenous peoples make up less than five percent of the world’s population, but account for 15 percent of the poorest. Do you know that they speak majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and represent 5,000 different cultures.

Indigenous languages are a significant factor in a wide range of indigenous issues, notably education, scientific and technological development, biosphere and the environment, freedom of expression, employment and social inclusion. However, many indigenous peoples continue to be confronted with marginalization, extreme poverty and other human rights violations.

We can’t ignore the fact that language plays an important role in daily lives of the people. It is one of the finest ways to communicate with each other. It is important in the areas like human rights protection, peace building and sustainable development. Due to various factors, languages in the world continue to disappear at an alarming rate and most of them are indigenous languages. For these threats only, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted a resolution (A/RES/71/178) on ‘Rights of Indigenous Peoples’ by proclaiming 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages.

9 August commemorates the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples worldwide. This date marks the day of the first meeting, in 1982, of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights.

This year, the celebration of the international day will be dedicated to the International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019.

The linguistic rights of indigenous peoples must be an integral part of the human rights agenda.

On this special day dedicated to indigenous peoples, their human rights, languages, ancient histories, and rich cultures, several activities are taking place worldwide.

UNESCO, as lead agency for the implementation of the international year, is launching a global social media campaign for the promotion of the day, including circulation of the Director General’s Message and launch of a dedicated video. Several Field Offices have organized relevant initiatives for the promotion, revitalization and support of indigenous languages .

Steps are being taken to allowing them to enhance their social, political and economic integration in communities and society by enlarging the scope of activities available to them. UNESCO contributes to the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, particularly on article 9 Accessibility, article 21 Freedom of expression and access to information, article 24 education and article 32 International cooperation.

Cultural diversity and multilingualism on the Internet have a key role to play in fostering pluralistic, equitable, open and inclusive knowledge societies. UNESCO encourages its Member States to develop comprehensive language-related policies, to allocate resources and use appropriate tools to promote and facilitate linguistic diversity and multilingualism, including the Internet and media within the framework of UNESCO Recommendation concerning the Promotion and Use of Multilingualism and Universal Access to Cyberspace.

Practical assistance extended by the Tribal Foundation (Nagercoil)
To counter the existing human versus animal conflict, saplings of lemon were distributed to the tribal people. Since the bush has spikes in its branches monkeys would never prefer the bushes to pluck the lemon fruits. Innovations have been carried in this aspect and it was found a success story that the fruits could be harvested and monkeys spare the bush from raids.

Courtesy (photos and report) Davidson Sargunam by email (15 August 2019)

More posts contributed by Davidson Sargunam >>

For inquiries on environmental exposure programs, please contact
Davidson Sargunam
Environmental Educationist
M: 09994138550
email: ssdavidson9@gmail.com

Tribal Foundation
23, Cave Street, Duthie School Road
Nagercoil – 629 001
Tamil Nadu
Reg. No: 1116/2009

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Posted in Accountability, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Languages and linguistic heritage, Multi-lingual education, Organizations, Seasons and festivals, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on In honour of the inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures, their ways of relating to people and the environment: International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2019 celebrated in the Western Ghats – Tamil Nadu

Women of the Rabari community: Their contribution to international design and typography – Chhattisgarh

Learn more about this initiative >>

A digital typeface based on Godna tattoo art from Chhattisgarh, and designed in collaboration with three tribal women (Ram Keli, Sunita and Sumitra) from the marginalised in partnership with Dutch designers, origanisations and educational institutions | Continue readinghttp://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21844

 

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Kerala State Folklore Akademi: An independent center for cultural affairs reviving interest in rural life – Kerala

“The Folklore Akademy, recently in its study and analysis have identified various other folklore art forms which are a part of our rich cultural heritage. ‘Brahmini pattu’, ‘Chaatt Pattu’, ‘Chakra Pattu’, ‘Kadal vanchi Pattu’ and the tribal songs are the recent additions to the folklore art. There are different types of tribal and traditional songs.

The tribal songs of each ‘Ooru’ (a tribal colony) are different,” he said. […]

According to Pradeep Kumar, as per their assessment, there are nearly 1,000 folk art forms existing in Kerala, which have been passed on from generation to generation.

Source: Folk Art Forms from Far and Wide to Converge in City
URL: http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/kochi/2014/jan/22/Folk-Art-Forms-from-Far-and-Wide-to-Converge-in-City-566887.html
Date visited: 11 August 2019

KANNUR: Nowadays, it’s rare to hear folk songs being sung by contestants belonging to the tribal communities.  So, when a group of tribal girl students rendered the folk song ‘panthal patt’ at the state school youth festival on Sunday, not only was the audience enthralled, but a record was also created as the team from Government High School at Balal in Kasargod won an ‘A’ grade, a first for tribal students. | Read the full report here >>

The students of Government High School at Balal in Kasargod, who won ‘A’ grade at the State School Youth Fest in Kannur on Sunday | T K Swaroop >>

Source: Sahla Nechiyil, Express News Service, 23rd January 2017
URL: http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/2017/jan/23/little-bards-croon-the-folklore-of-their-tribe-at-kerala-school-youth-festival-1562448.html
Date visited: 11 August 2019

 

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Kerala Folklore Akademi, an independent center for cultural affairs, was established on 28 june 1995. The main objective of the akademi is to promote and project the traditional art forms of Kerala.

Kerala Folklore Akademi, an autonomours center for cultural affairs, is located in Kannur. Kannur District, Kerala.The institution was constituted by the Goverment of Kerala and works under the Cultural Affairs Department, Goverment of Kerala.

The institution provides financial assistance of folk artists.Economic aid programs and academic councils are conducted to promotr the traditional Kerala art forms. The institution aims to promote and preserve the traditional art forms of Kerala. Kerala Folklore Akademi was constituted by the Goverment of Kerala on 28 June 1995 under the Cultural Affairs Department,Goverment of Kerala, Trivandrum. The Institution was formed under the Travancore Cochin Literary, Scientific and Charitable Societies Registration act of 1955. It began functioning on 20 January 1996.

Ongoing projects.

Awards, Felloships and Gurupooja Puraskar to the established artists.Last year the distribution was as follows:Felloship – 3, Awards – 27, Gurupooja Puraskar – 22 A part from this, talented young artists are awarded Prasasthi Pathram also. On the name of our former Chairman late P.KKalan an award is constituted worth Rs.50000/- This year the award was given to the top most folk performing artists/researcher for their total contribution in the field of Folkelore.

Source: Kerala Folklore Akademi
Address : http://keralafolkloreakademy.com/about_us.html
Date Visited: Tue Oct 07 2014 13:20:31 GMT+0200 (CEST)

The Hindu, KANNUR, August 22, 2011
Mohamed Nazeer

The Kerala State Folklore Akademi is planning to develop four ‘folk villages’ for preserving and displaying the unique features of rural life and culture.

The folk villages will be ‘living museums’ displaying features of indigenous rural culture, including the rich folk tradition and folk arts, the akademi’s new chairman, B. Muhammad Ahamed, told The Hindu here on Sunday. He said the folk villages would be modelled on similar projects in different parts of the world that showcased replicas of traditional cultural elements, practices, performances, skills, and craft. […]

Performance of folk arts and the ritual of Theyyam would be the major features of the folk village planned at Kannapuram, he said. A third folk village would be developed in a village in Malappuram, while the proposal to develop the fourth one in an Adivasi area to showcase Adivasi life and culture was under serious consideration. Talking about expanding the activities of the akademi, Prof. Ahamed, who had served as chairman of the akademi earlier also, said the institution was now planning to extend its activities to the southern parts of the State to popularise folk culture and create awareness among people in those areas. […]

A folklore centre was proposed in Chembai village in Palakkad district as part of this initiative […]. A similar centre was also proposed in Thiruvananthapuram district, he said. Prof. Ahamed said the akademi, established in 1995 with the objective of promoting and projecting the traditional art forms of the State, would also extend its efforts to identify folk artistes in financial difficulties and ill-health and offer them financial grant.

The development activities taken up on the premises of the akademi — located on the banks of a ‘chira’ (pond) at Chirakkal, the seat of the erstwhile Kolathiri Rajas — would also be completed, he said. A Cherusseri auditorium, which would have a statue of Cherusseri, was nearing completion and its inauguration was being planned as the first programme of the new board of the akademi. […]

The archives would house folklore items, including records and documents, from different parts of the State. The archives would be planned in a separate building on the same premises.

Folklore akademi plans ‘folk villages’ to revive public interest in the unique features of rural life.

Source: The Hindu : NATIONAL / KERALA : Space to preserve folk traditions
Address : http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-kerala/article2381105.ece
Date Visited: Fri Sep 02 2011 21:49:49 GMT+0200 (CEST)


[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

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Posted in Anthropology, Cultural heritage, Government of India, Maps, Modernity, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Southern region, Tourism, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Kerala State Folklore Akademi: An independent center for cultural affairs reviving interest in rural life – Kerala