Thulir, a modern school where alternatives to mainstream education, technologies and lifestyles are explored – Tamil Nadu

We at Thulir have been looking at alternatives to the mainstream education system, so that we may be able to cater to the needs of those children who get left out/left behind.

As part of our learning at Thulir, we have been experimenting with alternative technologies and life styles. Being an Adivasi Village, we thought this is a good place to shed our urban middle- class upbringing/ life style and experiment with alternatives.

Buildings: Our house and Thulir campus is built out of local low energy materials like mud, thatch, stone etc. with very minimal use of steel and concrete. […]

Source: http://www.thulir.org/wp/alternatives/
Visited: 12 October 2018

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Gond artists Jangarh Singh Shyam & Roshni Vyam: “Universal appeal and technical prowess” – Madhya Pradesh

A masterly tribute to a cult Gond artist

Openthemagazine.com, Books, 09 March 2018 | Read the full review by Preema John >>

Jangarh Singh Shyam: The Enchanted Forest Paintings and Drawings from the Crites Collection | Aurogeeta Das

The first publication of its kind, this book examines Jangarh’s life and works from an academic and historical point of view. It focuses largely but not only on the Crites Collection of Jangarh’s work, collected by Mitchell and Niloufer from the artist directly between 1983 and 2001. The Crites Collection forms the largest body of Jangarh’s work and traces his artistic development from its very early stages when he first showed his work at the Surajkund mela in Delhi. […]

In a small village in Madhya Pradesh in the early 1960s, Jangarh was born into a family of Pardhans who were customarily storytellers of the Gond community. There is still speculation about the exact year and date of his birth. Growing up, he was a skilled musician and flutist; it was only later in life that he became a pioneering visual artist depicting different aspects of village life, beliefs and worship using various mediums, creating almost a pantheon of Gond visual idioms that had never been depicted this way before.

The Enchanted Forest unpacks critical issues in art history that form a basis for understanding Jangarh’s work, central among them being a debate on the classification and reception of tribal art versus contemporary art. Das argues that while these definitions need to be examined critically, Jangarh’s work ‘transcends these binaries’ given their universal appeal and technical prowess. […]

The book also explores the impact and development of the relationship between the artist and his patrons.

Source: http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/books/enchanted-canvas
Accessed: 15 March 2018

SHAILAJA TRIPATHI, The Hindu, Bengaluru, May 12, 2016 |To view more photos and read the full article here >>

Roshni Vyam, one of the finest contemporary Gond artists of her generation tells SHAILAJA TRIPATHI that while her family was her biggest inspiration, the textile designing course in NIFT Bengaluru widened her horizon

When she was five years old, Roshni Vyam would tell her uncle, Jangarh Singh Shyam, that one day she would paint canvases as big as the ones he did. […]

Last year, the 22-year-old was chosen with Bhajju Shyam, Venkat Raman Singh Shyam as the winners of the Ojas Art Award. The award has been constituted by Ojas Art Gallery and Teamwork Arts of Jaipur Literature Festival.

Digging into her first meal of the day at the café in National Institute of Fashion Technology, Bengaluru, where she is studying textile design, Roshni says she is trying to find a balance between her practice as a professional Gond artist and her studies. Frequent travels to Delhi where she is interning with fashion designer Nitin Bal Chauhan as part of her course can’t be a deterrent for someone who is deeply committed to the tribal art form of Gond originating in Madhya Pradesh.

She grew up in Sunpuri, a village in Mandla district in Madhya Pradesh, which is supposed to be the hub for Gond art.

Inspired by her family, neighbours and relatives practise it day in an out, Roshni took to the art form when she was five.

Her parents, Durga (Jangarh’s sister) and Subhash Vyam, who are also well-known Gond artists motivated her wholeheartedly.  […]

“Traditional gond art was essentially geometric in nature called dhigna but with time artists started to take inspiration from their surroundings. My mom does mahura style which is jewellery-inspired. I wanted to a fresh take on dhigna but on huge canvases,” says the young artist who is at present in Chennai conducting workshops in Dakshinachitra.

It was in Bhopal that the young mind started to understand the increasing significance of the indigenous visual traditions pushed by cultural institutions like Bharat Bhavan there. Travelling with her parents and seeing Jangarh’s rise in the world of art, Roshni had decided to pursue it full-throttle. “People advised me against joining an art school saying that in the name of ‘contemporarising’, I would end up ruining it. I joined NIFT to add value to my practice. I was so inspired by Nitin Bal Chauhan because he is an artist and fashion designer,” says Roshni.

But still the fear of losing a promising talent to the world of fashion remains. She with Mayank and Japani Shyam — Jangarh’s children — are amongst the most seminal contemporary gond artists of today. “No, I would never ever leave Gond. I am about to pass out and I didn’t take any job placement. I want to do my independent work.”

What has NIFT done for her? Her name was already in circulation. The galleries were already exhibiting her works which command prices between Rs.10,000 to Rs. 2.5 lakh. “NIFT was hectic and I kept participating in exhibitions even after joining the course. But it opened new vistas for me. I studied art forms of the world. I studied about textiles and these four years I have spent exploring the possibilities between various textiles and Gond.” […]

Nobody even knew what Gond is.”

Roshni wants to set up a gallery or a platform which will genuinely promote gond artists. “Now I am here and can see what’s happening around, I want to protect my fellow gond artists. I know how dealers go to our villages, buy it from the artists at such cheap prices and sell it at expensive prices.

What do these artists get? They are so naïve. I remember how my style was copied from the book “Bhimayana” because I had not got it copyrighted. […]

Source: Roshni Vyam on Gond art – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/roshni-vyam-on-gond-art/article8590227.ece
Date Visited: Sun May 15 2016 20:32:35 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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A craft workshop for Santal women in Purulia: Determined to overcome poverty – West Bengal

Daricha-Santals-Screen-Shot.jpg

This is the first time we have ventured out of traditional art/craft, but there is a connection because the skills necessary for this craft are traditional and the primary material, familiar.  We plan to revisit these villages in a few months to monitor progress.

Water is a huge problem in one of the villages. One tube well services the entire village – and let us not even talk of the so-called toilets made by the government. […]

The trainers were Santal women and even they, having gotten conditioned to their more developed surrounds in Birbhum and Barddhaman, from where they hail, were unable to live in the toilet-less villages of their Purulia sisters and also observed their poverty.

Source: courtesy Ratnaboli Bose, Daricha Foundation (by email, 5 October 2018)

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In search of solution for India’s chronically undernourished children: Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Rajasthan & Telangana

India’s ambitious ‘Zero Hunger’ program will be launched in three districts – Gorakhpur in Uttar Pradesh, Koraput in Odisha and Thane in Maharashtra on October 16, the World Food Day.

The Program will be initiated by Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) in association with Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), MS Swaminathan Research Foundation and Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC). Zero Hunger − pledges to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture, and is the priority of the World Food Programme.

Source: Current Affairs September 2017 – National
https://www.tutorialspoint.com/current_affairs_september_2017/national.htm
Date visited: 12 June 2018

More than 250 million Indians remain food insecure, ingesting less than 2,100 calories every day

Varun Gandhi, Hindustani Times, 20 April 2018

The stories from India’s hinterland on hunger are woeful in themselves. […]

More than 14.5% of our population is considered as undernourished, says the Global Hunger Index, 2017, with 21% children suffering from acute malnutrition, while 38.4% of children under the age of five suffer from stunting. This is reflected in the height of our children (children born in India are on average shorter than those in sub-Saharan Africa). More than 250 million Indians remain food insecure, ingesting less than 2,100 calories every day. As the Planning Commission put it in the Human Development Report, 2012: “If India is not in a state of famine, it is quite clearly in a state of chronic hunger.”

Source: Fighting hunger is India’s greatest challenge
URL: https://www.hindustantimes.com/analysis/fighting-hunger-is-india-s-greatest-challenge/story-1UBa5bIKbS094GpXnKQIAI.html
Date visited: 7 October 2018

For more information, check the “Global Hunger Index” (India):
http://www.ifpri.org/search?keyword=india

Forest Lanterns

India has over 11 million tribal children, and 4.9 million of them are chronically undernourished. Forest Lanterns is a collection of invited essays on forty-six solutions from solution seekers working on the ground to improve the nutrition of tribal children from nine states (Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Rajasthan and Telangana) in India. With contributions from the who’s who of policymakers, bureaucrats, practitioners and experts, the essays conclude with key takeaways for doers for replicating or scaling-up these change initiatives.

Source: Forest Lanterns
URL: http://penguin.co.in/enterprise/forest-lanterns/
Date visited: 12 June 2018

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Tip | Check recent updates on improved living conditions for India’s indigenous communities: World Water Day held annually on 22 March – United Nations

un-water-fresco-forum_2011

World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.

An international day to celebrate freshwater was recommended at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The United Nations General Assembly responded by designating 22 March 1993 as the first World Water Day.

Each year, World Water Day highlights a specific aspect of freshwater. In 2015, World Water Day has the theme “Water and Sustainable Development”.

In 2016, the theme is “Water and Jobs,” in 2017 “Wastewater” and in 2018 “Nature-based Solutions for Water”.

Source: UN-Water: World Water Day
Address: http://www.unwater.org/campaigns/world-water-day/en/
Declaration of the Youth participants of the launching of the 2013 International Year of Water Cooperation

To view the Info-Graphic by unwater.org titled Water: Cooperation or Competition?, click here (PDF) >>

Pavillon de l’eau, Paris, France, 11 February 2013 

Preamble
1. We, the youth participating in the launching of the 2013 International Year of Water Cooperation, having met in Paris, France on 11 February 2013, are working together for the protection, restoration and better management of natural resources,
particularly fresh water, a vital resource which is becoming increasingly scarce and polluted every day.
2. We affirm our commitment to cooperate and to find solutions to the challenges that are threatening the
livelihoods of millions of people around the world, with emphasis on unequal access to water and sanitation, its linkages with climate change and a more equitable water governance, including aspects related to gender equality.
3. We affirm to work with honesty, transparency, with and for our communities, to join forces and share
capacities; to be fair between human needs and natural resources, and, to act in good faith.
4. We also affirm our commitment to cooperate and contribute to our governments’ efforts in achieving “The
Future We Want”, as well as in the implementation of other water-related international agreements, the 2013
International Year of Water Cooperation, the International Decade for Action: Water for Life”, the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, and the 2012 Declaration of the World Youth Parliament for Water.

[…] we acknowledge that enhanced cooperation, good governance and stakeholders’ participation at local, national, international and basin levels are essential for fair, and inclusive water distribution based on the local circumstances . We also highlight the role of parliaments in generating inclusive participation in cooperation with governments, civil society actors, water and sanitation experts, indigenous people, women, youth, and children, because we can altogether achieve great things with relatively small efforts.

Source: Youth_Declaration-International_Year_of_Water_Cooperation_2013.pdf
Address: http://www.unwater.org/fileadmin/user_upload/watercooperation2013/doc/Youth_Declaration-International_Year_of_Water_Cooperation_2013.pdf
Date Visited: Wed Mar 22 2017 09:50:50 GMT+0100 (CET)

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