Category Archives: Tribal identity

“While benefiting from affirmative action in some cases, Adivasis or indigenous people in India also feel the claustrophobic confines of their identity which has been imposed on them by others, be it the colonial administrator, the colonial anthropologist, the missionary or the neo-liberal, neo-imperialist forces that rule global economy today.” – Ivy Imogene Hansdak in “Inaugural Speech for the National Conference“ (Tribes In Transition-II” 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23032

“We realise that the only way a culture gets conserved is when it is promoted. […] We have decided that as and when such information is gathered we would immediately introduce them into the curriculum at the various levels.” – Culture Centre (Viswa Bharathi Vidyodaya Trust, Nilgiri)
https://www.vidyodaya.org/vbvt/culture/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1921

“Adivasis do not need an education [in boarding or ‘factory schools’] to understand the rights over one’s own lands, forests and territories, which they imbibe growing up in their community itself.” – Adivasi leader Soni Sori from Bastar, Chhattisgarh quoted by Goldy M. George in “Adivasis Protest Awarding of World Congress of Anthropology 2023 to KISS” (Forward Press, 23 July 2020), p. 4
https://www.academia.edu/43929808/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20406

“Jawaharlal Nehru was among the few people who understood Elwin’s belief that tribal society must be allowed to evolve in its own distinctive manner and its culture must not be violated. Elwin was for a long time his major adviser on tribal affairs. Not that Nehru was altogether able to prevent the exploitation of tribals and the violation of their culture; but at least he kept it in some check.” – Guest Column titled “Hands off tribal culture” (India Today, 9 January 2014)
https://www.indiatoday.in/magazine/guest-column/story/19800915-hands-off-tribal-culture-821415-2014-01-09
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=15861

“This is a phase of revolt for tribal writers, who are trying to showcase the tribes in the same light. It is only after this that the tribal writers can write about the beauty of their world.” – Jitendra Vasava (a lecturer at Adivasi Academy, Tejgadh) in “Symposium held on Gujarat tribal literature, culture” (Indian Express, 28 February 2010)
http://archive.indianexpress.com/news/symposium-held-on-gujarat-tribal-literature/585310
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6304

“For strategic planners, forests are ‘an administrative category implying a desired land use’ whether or not trees are included, but it is useful in making claims to ‘extend the control of the forest service’. […] To tribal people, forests involve habitat and identity and are thus inseparably linked to their lives and livelihoods. Because of this reality, several inter-disciplinarians see forests as something linked to human rights for indigenous communities.” – Rebecca S . David in “An analysis of the impact of the Forest Rights Act (2006) in three states of India” (MPhil University of Cambridge, UK, 2014), p. 1
https://www.academia.edu/30648733/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=27254

“The socio-political mainstream [is] unaccustomed to accept them as civilized human being, tries to subjugate them. They agree to accept non-tribal intellectuals at the cost of betrayal to their self-identity.’ – Teresa Tudu in “Tribal Literature: Santhals and their Cultural Anxiety” (conference paper, Tribes In Transition-II” 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23277

“The word “tribe” itself, in fact, has always been a contentious term. Due to the lack of an adequate term, indigenous people chose to adopt it to identify their place in the world. The narrative is changing today. […] Tribes are people with a functional social order, culture, customs, cosmology and metaphysics. They must be treated as any other contemporary people.” – Richard Kamei in “Uncivilising the Mind: How anthropology shaped the discourse on tribes in India” (Caravan Magazine, 1 March 2021)
https://caravanmagazine.in/books/anthropologists-tribes-india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=2261

Video | Environmentalism of the poor: “Ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival” – Centre for Science and Environment – Delhi

Environmentalism of the poor By Sunita Narain For many disadvantaged communities in developing countries, ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival. In India, protests and social movements are expressing these worries. All over India … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Commentary, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Globalization, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Video | Environmentalism of the poor: “Ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival” – Centre for Science and Environment – Delhi

“Give life to the constitutional ideals”: How to combat oppression and cruelty faced tribes – B R Ambedkar Memorial Lecture by Supreme Court Judge

Tribals are subject to oppression and cruelty even after independence and still picked up by the investigating officers to cover up shoddy investigations, Supreme Court Judge Justice D.Y. Chandrachud said on Monday. Justice Chandrachud was speaking at the 13th B … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Colonial policies, Commentary, Constitution and Supreme Court, Democracy, History, Misconceptions, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Tips | Comments Off on “Give life to the constitutional ideals”: How to combat oppression and cruelty faced tribes – B R Ambedkar Memorial Lecture by Supreme Court Judge

Tip | How many ‘Scheduled Tribes’ are there in India? And what distinguishes them from other communities? (‘tribal’ or otherwise) – Information provided by the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes

There are over 700 tribes (with overlapping communities in more than one State) which have been notified under Article 342 of the Constitution of India, spread over different States and Union Territories of the country. The largest number of main … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Constitution and Supreme Court, Democracy, Economy and development, FAQ, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Organizations, Quotes, Regions of India, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Tips | Comments Off on Tip | How many ‘Scheduled Tribes’ are there in India? And what distinguishes them from other communities? (‘tribal’ or otherwise) – Information provided by the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes

Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

Adivasi people: proud not primitive | Read the full article >> […] Defining what’s special about India’s adivasi or indigenous people is complicated. People, mostly anthropologists and human rights defenders, who know adivasis and have worked closely with them, also tend … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Assimilation, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Organizations, Poetry, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Topics and issues, Tourism, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

eBook | Jawaharlal Nehru’s “five principles” for the policy to be pursued vis-a-vis the tribals

Jawaharlal Nehru [1889–1964, first Prime Minister of India] formulated the following five principles for the policy to be pursued vis-a-vis the tribals: (1) People should develop along the lines of their own genius, and the imposition of alien values should … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, Democracy, eBook eJournal PDF, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Tribal identity | Comments Off on eBook | Jawaharlal Nehru’s “five principles” for the policy to be pursued vis-a-vis the tribals