Category Archives: Adverse inclusion

“The new normal is the many millions marching back in search of those livelihoods that we destroyed these past three decades.” – P. Sainath (founder of PARI “People’s Archive of Rural India”) in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/

“After Independence, the erstwhile aborigines were classified as scheduled tribes, the untouchables were classified as scheduled castes and others included in the backward classes. Although, many of the denotified, nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes are spread among SC/ST/OBC, many are still not classified anywhere and have no access to socio-economic benefits, whether education, health, housing or otherwise. […] There are many anomalies in terms of identification of these communities, from state to state. Many people also do not know what is denotified tribe and which authority is looking after their grievances.” – Bibek Debroy in “An unfortunate legacy” (Indian Express, 5 January 2017)
https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/crime-criminal-act-racial-discrimination-non-bailable-offence-criminal-tribes-act-an-unfortunate-legacy-4459258/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=12284

“While benefiting from affirmative action in some cases, Adivasis or indigenous people in India also feel the claustrophobic confines of their identity which has been imposed on them by others, be it the colonial administrator, the colonial anthropologist, the missionary or the neo-liberal, neo-imperialist forces that rule global economy today.” – Ivy Hansdak in “Inaugural Speech for the National Conference“ (Tribes In Transition-II” 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23032

“Tribal groups (adivasis) in India have often been excluded, marginalized and oppressed by ‘mainstream’ society. In many ways this exclusion, marginalization and oppression is fostered by the way in which ‘mainstream’ society looks at the adivasis – as exotic, dangerous, or ‘primitive’ others.” – GN Devy in “A Nomad Called Thief: Reflections on Adivasi Silence and Voice” (Orientblackswan.com 2006)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13801

“Who, if anyone, is excluded—or adversely included—from equitable access to public goods, why and by what processes is such exclusion or adverse inclusion accomplished, and what can be done to change this to a more just and equitable set of outcomes? […] resulting in intense dispossession, sexual and economic exploitation, alarming health and nutrition declines as well as precarious survival. […] The picture that emerges from the report is in many ways grim and troubling, one that affirms that there continue to be significant populations that are consistently and often extremely deprived of access to public goods that are essential for a human life with dignity.” – “The India Exclusion Report 2015: A comprehensive, annually updated analysis on the exclusion of disadvantaged groups in India” (First Edition, New Delhi 2016, www.yodapress.co.in, supported by UNICEF, UNFPA and UN Women)
https://www.im4change.org/docs/91763text-final_India-Exclusion-Report-round2Final.pdf
https://www.indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22410

“Since independence, multiple government policies and programmes sought to develop tribal communities by focusing on their livelihood, education and health. […] Debts are one of the main coping strategies, resulting in a hand-to-mouth existence for those affected.” – Programme report on Tribal nutrition: “UNICEF’s efforts to support the tribal population, especially children who suffer from malnourishment.”
https://www.unicef.org/india/what-we-do/tribal-nutrition
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11674

The Tribe against Itself: Narratives of Ethnicity and Othering of the Bodos and the Adivasis in Bodoland – “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi

Abstract 10: The Tribe against Itself: Narratives of Ethnicity and Othering of the Bodos and the Adivasis in Bodoland Paper presented for “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi EVY MEHZABEEN Centre for the Study … Continue reading

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“To be taught in a language other than one’s own has a negative effect on learning”: Teaching experiences with English medium in Adivasi education – Viswa Bharati Vidyodaya & UNESCO

Tip: https://azimpremjiuniversity.edu.in/SitePages/resources-lc-issue-7-august-2020-multilingual-context.aspx It is a complex issue. Something we have been grappling with over the years. Ideally linguistic diversity must be protected at all costs. But pragmatically, in our increasing globalised world restricting people to their own language when only … Continue reading

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Role models for members of “hill-tribes” forcibly brought down to the plains: Irulas in pursuit of higher education – Tamil Nadu

How Tamil Nadu’s Irula students are struggling to pursue higher education | To read the full story in the New Indian Express, click here >> As [the correspondent] travels across the northern districts of Villupuram, Kallakurichi, Vellore, and Tiruvannamalai, it … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, Bees and honey, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Health and nutrition, Languages and linguistic heritage, Maps, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Success story, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Role models for members of “hill-tribes” forcibly brought down to the plains: Irulas in pursuit of higher education – Tamil Nadu

Understanding the challenges faced by Adivasi Society: “We will follow our beliefs, customs, deities, rituals, culture, in our own way”

All the tribals in the country have been following many different religions like Gondi, Koya Punem, Adi, Sarna, etc. However, none of them have been recognised. The government should provide a separate code for tribal religion so that their identity … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Government of India, History, Misconceptions, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Tribal culture worldwide, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Understanding the challenges faced by Adivasi Society: “We will follow our beliefs, customs, deities, rituals, culture, in our own way”

How to fight malnutrition and increase diversity of choice for lower-income households? Improve traditional supply chains! – The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Addressing malnutrition requires a multisectoral approach that includes complementary interventions in food systems, public health and education. This approach also facilitates the pursuit of multiple objectives, including better nutrition, gender equality and environmental sustainability. […] Both traditional and modern supply … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Childhood and children, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Globalization, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women | Comments Off on How to fight malnutrition and increase diversity of choice for lower-income households? Improve traditional supply chains! – The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)