Category Archives: Adverse inclusion

“While benefiting from affirmative action in some cases, Adivasis or indigenous people in India also feel the claustrophobic confines of their identity which has been imposed on them by others, be it the colonial administrator, the colonial anthropologist, the missionary or the neo-liberal, neo-imperialist forces that rule global economy today.” – Ivy Hansdak in “Inaugural Speech for the National Conference“ (Tribes In Transition-II” 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23032

“Tribal groups (adivasis) in India have often been excluded, marginalized and oppressed by ‘mainstream’ society. In many ways this exclusion, marginalization and oppression is fostered by the way in which ‘mainstream’ society looks at the adivasis – as exotic, dangerous, or ‘primitive’ others.” – GN Devy in “A Nomad Called Thief: Reflections on Adivasi Silence and Voice” (Orientblackswan.com 2006)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13801

The India Exclusion Report 2015 (supported by UNICEF, UNFPA and UN Women):
“Who, if anyone, is excluded—or adversely included—from equitable access to public goods, why and by what processes is such exclusion or adverse inclusion accomplished, and what can be done to change this to a more just and equitable set of outcomes? […] resulting in intense dispossession, sexual and economic exploitation, alarming health and nutrition declines as well as precarious survival. […] “The picture that emerges from the report is in many ways grim and troubling, one that affirms that there continue to be significant populations that are consistently and often extremely deprived of access to public goods that are essential for a human life with dignity.”
https://www.indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22410

Special issue dedicated to the study of tribal culture in India (open access) – Asian Ethnology

Kondagaon Dance Competition 2004 from Asian Ethnology on Vimeo. Editors’ Note Frank J. Korom (Boston University) & Benjamin Dorman (Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture), 28 September 2014, Nagoya, Japan This year we bring you a special double issue dedicated to … Continue reading

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Representations of Birsa Munda: Leader of the 1890 Munda rebellion – Jharkhand

Imagine a 25-year-old who took on an empire, left an indelible mark on tribal rights across the country and was seen as a mystic and folk hero for hundreds of thousands. Few would have achieved so much in so short a … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Eastern region, eBook download sites, ePub, History, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Names and communities, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Representations of Birsa Munda: Leader of the 1890 Munda rebellion – Jharkhand

The Koli (Kori, Kol), aboriginal communities found “from Kashmir to Kanya Kumari”: Representations from ancient epics to freedom struggle and modern India

Posted by Bhushan on 01 January, 2011 | Read the full article here >> […] It is interesting to note that Koris trace their history to the past where all present day downtrodden reach. This again bursts the myth that there … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Archaeology, Colonial policies, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Networking, Northern region, Quotes, Rural poverty, Social conventions, Western region, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on The Koli (Kori, Kol), aboriginal communities found “from Kashmir to Kanya Kumari”: Representations from ancient epics to freedom struggle and modern India

Adivasis (Scheduled Tribes) are the largest tribal population in the world – World Directory of Minorities

Profile | To read the full article, click here >> Adivasis is the collective name used for the many indigenous peoples of India. The term Adivasi derives from the Hindi word ‘adi’ which means of earliest times or from the … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on Adivasis (Scheduled Tribes) are the largest tribal population in the world – World Directory of Minorities

“We have a moral imperative to ensure every child has a right to an appropriate education of high quality”: Unesco Education report 2020

In line with its mandate, the 2020 GEM Report assesses progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4) on education and its ten targets, as well as other related education targets in the SDG agenda. The Report also addresses inclusion in … Continue reading

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