Category Archives: Colonial policies

In 1871, the British passed the “Criminal Tribes Act.” It notified about 150 tribes around India as criminal, giving the police wide powers to arrest them and monitor their movements. The effect of this law was simple: just being born into one of those 150 tribes made you a criminal. – Dilip D’Souza (Bombay based freelance journalist)
Source: Vicious cycle in Folio “Adivasi”: Special issue with the Sunday Magazine of The Hindu (JULY 16, 2000)

Audio | United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Repatriation is an important part of reconciliation

Indigenous people across North America are working to return thousands of sacred objects and ancestral remains, belongings that were taken and put in museums, galleries, private collections, and universities. […] “Some of the struggles I think our people have is just … Continue reading

Posted in Colonial policies, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, eBook download sites, History, Museum collections - general, Networking, Quotes, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Audio | United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Repatriation is an important part of reconciliation

Tips | Nature, wildlife and more

“Gandhi believed that giving more importance, value and relevance to practical skills, and applying traditional knowledge to solving day-to-day problems were essential for the development of rural India.” – Bunker Roy, the founder of Barefoot College, which helps rural communities becomes … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Bees and honey, Colonial policies, Commentary, Crocodile, Customs, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Elephant, Ethnobotany, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Health and nutrition, History, Hyderabad biodiversity pledge, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Regions of India, Revival of traditions, Sacred grove, Success story, Tiger, Tips, Trees, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Tips | Nature, wildlife and more

Economic policies of the colonial and post-colonial states: The Kurichia community of Wayanad – Kerala

Impacts of socio economic changes on tribes of Waynad in the colonial and post colonial period A study with special reference to Kurichias by Rajan, E K | Read the full chapter here >> CHAPTER – VI  ECONOMIC IMPACT OF … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Colonial policies, De- and re-tribalisation, Economy and development, Government of India, History, Maps, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Southern region, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Economic policies of the colonial and post-colonial states: The Kurichia community of Wayanad – Kerala

Community-based initiatives in search of collaborative partnerships: Digital audiovisual archives facilitated by Adivasi Academy at Tejgadh – Gujarat

DIGITAL COMMUNITY ARCHIVES FOR VERNACULAR MUSICS: CASES FROM INDIA Aditi Deo (University of Oxford) | Read the full article here >> […] This article draws upon ethnographic research in small towns in north India with local small-scale initiatives to archive oral … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Maps, Modernity, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Success story, Western region | Tagged | Comments Off on Community-based initiatives in search of collaborative partnerships: Digital audiovisual archives facilitated by Adivasi Academy at Tejgadh – Gujarat

First novel by an adivasi in Kerala – Kocharethi

SARASWATHY NAGARAJAN, The Hindu: Life & Style / Metroplus, 27 April 2011 Narayan, author of Kocharethi, the first novel by an adivasi in Kerala, and Catherine Thankamma, who translated the book into English, talk about the book and its place on the … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Customs, Health and nutrition, History, Literature - fiction, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Press snippets, Southern region, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on First novel by an adivasi in Kerala – Kocharethi