Category Archives: Literature – fiction

“Memory plays a significant role in unfolding and revealing the tribal literature [being] collectively owned by the community and every member has the right and authority to interpret and translate as per one’s ability and genius to the best to make it accurate and appropriate. [I]nterpreting and translating from memory that has been handed down from generation to another [is] the only way to obtain accuracy as there is no written text.” – Abstract by Athikho Kaisii (“Tribes In Transition” conference 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25096

“Tribal literature, be it songs, arts or crafts, do not have written scripts, when any literature, in order to stand the tests of time, needs to be preserved in print.” – Tribal scholar-writer from Nadurbar district of Maharashtra, Vaharoo Sonvane, in a conference paper titled “Future of tribal literature” (quoted in The Telegraph Ranchi, 29 April 2005)

“It’s high time we recognise the contributions of tribal women in Indian literature.” – Devendra Kumar Devesh of Sahitya Akademi (“Tribes In Transition” conference 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22856

“The Ahoms ruled Assam for 600 years until the British took over in 1826. […] Modern history writing in Assam has also maintained a silence about these smaller kingdoms with fascinating, dramatic histories and intriguing royal families.” – Introduction to Indira Goswami’ s novel, The Bronze Sword of Thengphakhri Tehsildar (quoted in The Hindu, 2 March, 2013)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-authors/a-literary-bridge/article4465234.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=10674

“Narayan’s tale refuses to romanticise tribal ways of life — the pure, noble savage, Narayan shows, does not exist except as myth. He maps, of course, their intimate eco-vision, but also shows how disease ravages them due to their ignorance, alcoholism and the uneven gender relations. But he also points the finger at the economic exploitation that proves, finally, to be the bane of the community in the ‘new India’.” – Pramod K. Nayar in “Cultures in transformation”, reviewing Kocharethi by Narayan, the first tribal novelist of South India (The Hindu, 3 April 2011)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/Cultures-in-transformation/article14669586.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1459

“Some educated tribal writers from the North Eastern states have recently managed to enter the national discourse (such as Temsula Ao who writes in English and used to teach at NEHU Shillong) but most tribals from eastern, central and southern India […] use languages that are inaccessible to the mainstream. The well-known Santal poet from Jharkhand, Nirmala Putul, started writing in Santali and remained unknown until she was translated into Hindi by Ashok Singh.” – Scholar-publicist Ivy Hansdak (The Johar Journal), email 20 October 2020
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11376

“[T]here is a group of tribal writers, who, through their literature, are giving an answer to the questions raised on their identity. This is a phase of revolt for tribal writers, who are trying to showcase the tribes in the same light. It is only after this that the tribal writers can write about the beauty of their world.” – Jitendra Vasava (lecturer at Adivasi Academy, Tejgadh), “Symposium held on Gujarat tribal literature, culture” (Indian Express, 28 February 2010)
http://archive.indianexpress.com/news/symposium-held-on-gujarat-tribal-literature/585310
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6304

“The rights of tribal people, the lives of ordinary workers and the depiction of female desire were amongst the themes explored by the writer Mahasweta Devi. [Her] writing offers a way of using language to explore ideas about power, freedom and feminism.” – Introduction to novelist Preti Taneja’s radio programme “Books to Make Space For on the Bookshelf: Sindhubala” (BBC Arts & Ideas 17 March 2021)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p099jckg
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20816

Poet and novelist Mamang Dai: A member of a tribe of “ten thousand messengers / carrying the whispers of the world” – Arunachal Pradesh

Mamang Dai (India, 1957) is a poet and novelist. She lives in Itanagar in the North-east Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. She has one collection of poetry, River Poems, to her credit. Her next collection, Midsummer-Survival Lyrics, is due for publication in … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural heritage, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Storytelling, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Poet and novelist Mamang Dai: A member of a tribe of “ten thousand messengers / carrying the whispers of the world” – Arunachal Pradesh

Telling the story of the Sabars: Mahasweta Devi’s historical novel “The Book of the Hunter” set in 6th-century Bengal

MAHASWETA DEVI’S novel The Book of the Hunter (first published in Bengali as Byadhkhanda in 1994), is the latest in Seagull’s excellent ongoing enterprise to bring the powerful oeuvre of the literary activist to a readership well beyond Bengal. One … Continue reading

Posted in Colonial policies, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, History, Literature - fiction, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Telling the story of the Sabars: Mahasweta Devi’s historical novel “The Book of the Hunter” set in 6th-century Bengal

The Future of Tribal Oral Culture in the Age of Globalization/ Digitalization: Papers presented for “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi

Plenary Session 3: Panel Discussion on “The Future of Tribal Oral Culture in the Age of Globalization/ Digitalization” Chaired by: Prof. Virginius Xaxa, Professor of Eminence, Tezpur University, Assam & Chairman of Xaxa Planning Committee Panellists: Prof. Joseph Bara (IGNTU, … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Economy and development, Globalization, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Quotes, Storytelling, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on The Future of Tribal Oral Culture in the Age of Globalization/ Digitalization: Papers presented for “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi

Video | Setu “bridge” on Adivasi poet and publisher Jeetendra Vasava belonging to the Narmada region – Gujarat

The clip is called Setu, meaning bridge and features Jeetendra Vasava, a young writer belonging to the Narmada region in south Gujarat. Jeetendra speaks Dehwali, a tribal language spoken in regions of south Gujarat and northern Maharashtra. Jeetendra is a faculty … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood and children, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Narmada, Organizations, Poetry, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Storytelling, Video contents, Western region –  Western Zonal Council | Comments Off on Video | Setu “bridge” on Adivasi poet and publisher Jeetendra Vasava belonging to the Narmada region – Gujarat

Two novels on West Ghat tribal cultural heritage: Changing perceptions of land and its ownership – Kerala & Tamil Nadu

Two novels that capture local history in English translationEach novel is written from a different angle, yet both chronicle the lives of people attached to their land and customs while facing the pressures imposed by mainstream society: one by male Malayalam writer ‘Narayan’ who … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, Economy and development, Education and literacy, History, Literature - fiction, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Quotes, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Social conventions, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tips, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Two novels on West Ghat tribal cultural heritage: Changing perceptions of land and its ownership – Kerala & Tamil Nadu