Category Archives: Crafts and visual arts

“During our biggest festival ‘Sorhai’ there were decoration on the walls with flower designs, bird and animal figures. I saw my mother and sister drawing red and blue lines on the walls by climbing on the bamboo ladder. [C]enturies-old traditional knowledge and art of building low-cost-no-cost mud-houses and the related skills and crafts, like wall paintings die out.” – Boro Baski in “Is ‘brick house’ the only sign of development?” (translated from an article in Bengali Anandabazar Patrika, 21 July 2019)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=29829

“Tagore wanted his students to feel free despite being in the formal learning environment of a school, because he himself had dropped out of school when he found himself unable to think and felt claustrophobic within the four walls of a classroom. […] Thanks to Tagore’s legacy, Santiniketan has managed to preserve Bengal’s fast-disappearing rural crafts culture through folk markets, like the weekly Bondangaar Haat, and rural co-operatives, like Amar Kutir.” – Sanchari Pal (The Better India, 31 August 2016)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21449

“In post-independence India, two factors had an enduring influence on tribal art, bringing it out of its purely ritualistic and iconographic confines and allowing it to conquer its own contemporary artistic space — the government’s decision to promote an active ‘handicrafts’ policy and to give paper to tribal communities, and the creation of museums where this art could be showcased. Artists were no longer circumscribed to painting the walls of their homes.” – Vaiju Naravane in “Magical idiom” (The Hindu Magazine, 10 April 2010)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4731

“Today, the dual onslaught of commercialization and urbanization, means that weavers are being forced to churn out designs which cater to the demands of the market, rather than those which focus on their folk traditions. However, there is now a growing movement to preserve indigenous identity, and some serious attempts are being made to revive age-old customs, rites and stories by a conscious few within society.” – Ramona Sangma quoted by Avantika Bhuyan in “Folklore, myths and handloom” (Livemint, 1 December 2017)
https://www.livemint.com/Leisure/FR23TDZqwz1hDYOlB5mRSN/Folklore-myths-and-handloom.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691

“The adventure-filled origin myth about Bhil art revolves around the thirst for rain and water conservation – important for the people living in the dry western and central parts of India. Their close interaction with the natural world finds an abiding expression in their art, called pithora. Painting is like prayer for the Bhils, and each dot in the vibrant and colourful patterns represents an ancestor whom they invoke for the well-being of all forms of life.” – Background information for A Bhil Story
https://www.tulikabooks.com
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=19254

“[I]n the strict sense it is a misnomer to use the expression ‘tribal art’ for such objects since tribals themselves view them as utilitarian items rather than works of art. Objects are divided into four primary classes: totems, deities, toys and ornaments and utensils. Toys are used as offerings for the deities and utensils too are used for rituals.” – Niranjan Mahawar (collector of tribal art) quoted by Sreekant Khandekar in “Tribal art was dying out, commerce reduced good artists to artisans” (India Today, 22 August 2014)
https://www.indiatoday.in/magazine/society-the-arts/story/19820731-tribal-art-was-dying-out-commerce-reduced-good-artists-to-artisans-772004-2013-10-15
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7922

“[I]n a newly independent India […] handicrafts were a source of income and pride. Not only did such skills provide a livelihood locally, but they could become a unique global export.” – Feminist writer Gloria Steinem reviewing “A Passionate Life: Writings by and on Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay” by Ellen Carol Dubois and Vinay Lal (Openmagazine, 7 April 2017)
https://www.openthemagazine.com/article/books/kamaladevi-chattopadhyay-the-last-teacher
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20948

Video | Marriage customs of the Santals: A large mural created by village artists to express their cultural identity – West Bengal

Marriage Reception A Santal marriage takes five days and involves various, often complex, rituals. On the day of the Gidi-chumara (Marriage Reception) the women arrive to bless the bride and groom with grass and grains of rice which are kept … Continue reading

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Garo Drums: Symbols associated with specific regions and social occasions – Meghalaya, Assam, Tripura, Nagaland, West Bengal & Bangladesh

Garos are a tribal group from Meghalaya, predominantly residing in the Garo Hills region. Though found in the three (now five) Garo Hills districts, they also reside in the adjoining states of Assam, Tripura, Nagaland, and West Bengal in the … Continue reading

Posted in Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Economy and development, Government of India, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Performing arts, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Social conventions | Tagged | Comments Off on Garo Drums: Symbols associated with specific regions and social occasions – Meghalaya, Assam, Tripura, Nagaland, West Bengal & Bangladesh

The Power of Self-Interpretation: Ideas on Starting a Community Museum

[…] To appreciate the potential of the community museum, consider the challenges local communities, especially disadvantaged ones, face today. The effects of globalization include persistent poverty, loss of cultural identity, accelerated migration, and disintegration of the bonds of unity and … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Childhood, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Economy and development, Globalization, Government of India, History, Homes and utensils, Modernity, Museum collections - general, Museum collections - India, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Regions of India – Tribal heritage & indigenous knowledge, Storytelling, Tips, Tribal culture worldwide, Websites by tribal communities | Comments Off on The Power of Self-Interpretation: Ideas on Starting a Community Museum

Tribal voices worth listening to: On culture, land rights, employment, education and indigenous languages – Andaman, Kerala & Odisha

“Unless we affirm our culture and right and language, we won’t live. Our colour is good, our language is good, our art is good, our way of living is good. If we can respect your religion and your practices, why … Continue reading

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Video | “This land is mine. I will get it back: The struggle of women from the Rana Tharu community – Uttarakhand

Many Adivasis have lost their land in Uttarakhand. But Kamla Devi of Pindari village and Mangola Singh of Nandpur are resisting usury, fraud and gender prejudice to get back their farmland and secure their rights | Read the full story … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Crafts and visual arts, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Video resources - external, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | “This land is mine. I will get it back: The struggle of women from the Rana Tharu community – Uttarakhand