Category Archives: Crafts and visual arts

“Today, the dual onslaught of commercialization and urbanization, means that weavers are being forced to churn out designs which cater to the demands of the market, rather than those which focus on their folk traditions. However, there is now a growing movement to preserve indigenous identity, and some serious attempts are being made to revive age-old customs, rites and stories by a conscious few within society. [F]olklorists, anthropologists and sociocultural experts have intensified efforts to trace the imprints of myths, legends, ballads, songs and folk narratives in the weaves of the North-East. Each pattern is a little capsule of information—containing tales of ancestors, social values, clan practices, and more. Sangma cites the example of the dakmanda, a modern Garo wrap.” – Ramona Sangma quoted in Livemint (1 December 2017)
http://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691

“During our biggest festival ‘Sorhai’ there were decoration on the walls with flower designs, bird and animal figures. I saw my mother and sister drawing red and blue lines on the walls by climbing on the bamboo ladder. [C]enturies-old traditional knowledge and art of building low-cost-no-cost mud-houses and the related skills and crafts, like wall paintings die out.” – Dr. Boro Baski in “Is ‘brick house’ the only sign of development?” (Anandabazar Patrika, 21 July 2019)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=29829

“Tagore wanted his students to feel free despite being in the formal learning environment of a school, because he himself had dropped out of school when he found himself unable to think and felt claustrophobic within the four walls of a classroom. […] Thanks to Tagore’s legacy, Santiniketan has managed to preserve Bengal’s fast-disappearing rural crafts culture through folk markets, like the weekly Bondangaar Haat, and rural co-operatives, like Amar Kutir.” – Sanchari Pal, The Better India (31 August 2016)
http://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21449

“Woodsmoke and Leafcups”: A book that opens up the full joy of tribal life without romanticisation – Bastar

Woodsmoke and Leafcups; Madhu Ramnath, Harper Litmus, Rs.399. Felix Padel, The Hindu, March 12, 2016 | To read the full article, click here >> The full joy of tribal life opens up in these pages. As do the painful struggles under … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Bastar, Central region, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Tips, Tribal elders | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on “Woodsmoke and Leafcups”: A book that opens up the full joy of tribal life without romanticisation – Bastar

Tip | Find press reports on India’s tribal heritage: “Journalism without Fear or Favour” – United Nations World Press Freedom Day (3 May)

How to stop misinformation in times of coronavirus?Learn how to identify unverified content you receive on your cell phone and avoid spreading information on social media that has not been checked by credible sources. Caring for reliable information is everyone’s … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Dress and ornaments, Fashion, Games and leisure time, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Performing arts, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Tips, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Tip | Find press reports on India’s tribal heritage: “Journalism without Fear or Favour” – United Nations World Press Freedom Day (3 May)

Learn more about India’s Himalayan tribal communities

Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Democracy, Dress and ornaments, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Music and dance, Nature and wildlife, Northern region, Organizations, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Tips, Tourism, Trees, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Learn more about India’s Himalayan tribal communities

Western India’s cotton-growing and -dyeing technologies traced to Indus Valley civilization – Western region

The western region consists of the desert states of Gujarat and Rajasthan as well as Haryana, western Uttar Pradesh and western Madhya Pradesh. […] The region is home to a wide variety of people with different religious ‘s and cultures, … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Economy and development, Fashion, History, Modernity, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Western region, Women | Tagged , | Comments Off on Western India’s cotton-growing and -dyeing technologies traced to Indus Valley civilization – Western region

Infusing the Santhali Element in Schooling by Rina Mukherji

[…] “Santhal children are compelled to leave behind the culture they grew up in , whenever they go in for modern education and learning the rudiments of the three r’s. It results in their loss of confidence, and utter confusion … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Childhood and children, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Languages and linguistic heritage, Media portrayal, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Quotes, Seasons and festivals, Social conventions, Tribal elders, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Infusing the Santhali Element in Schooling by Rina Mukherji