Category Archives: Bastar

“The greater part of Bastar is a tilted peninsular plateau, varying in elevation between 284 and 1,200 m. […] The principal rivers of the region are Indravati and Sabari, both tributaries of the Godavari in the south, the largest of the rivers flowing from west to east in the region. Winter nights can be extremely cold and most Adivasi homes get by with a fire to sleep beside. Summer is hot, sometimes sufficiently so to cause stands of sal trees to dry up and die. […] Most agriculture is rain-fed, depending upon the south-west monsoon.” – Madhu Ramnath, Preface for Woodsmoke and Leafcups (HarperCollins India, 2015), pp. xviii
https://worldcat.org/en/title/930839347
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20305

“Bastar, a part of Dandakaranya in ancient time, is both a district as also a division in Chhattisgarh. Till 1997, it was a single district division in Madhya Pradesh. Bastar today is a division with five districts namely Bastar, Kanker, Dantewada, Narayanpur and Bijapur. This is a heavily forested, tribal-dominated area. The entire division is a notified scheduled area.” – Uma Ram (Professor & Head Department of English, Kakatiya PG College, Chhattisgarh) in “Issues in Tribal Education in Bastar, Chhattisgarh” (Folklore Foundation, Lokaratna, Volume IV 2011)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=14683

“Bastar, the land of tribes and about 70% of the total population of Bastar comprises tribals, which is 26.76% of the total tribal population of Chhattisgarh. […] The tribes of Bastar region are known for their unique and distinctive tribal culture and heritage in all over the world. Each tribal group in Bastar has their own distinct culture and enjoys their own unique traditional living styles.” – Visitors information, Chhattishgarh State Government (District-Bastar, 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25751

“Chhattisgarh is rich in its cultural heritage. The State has a very unique and vibrant culture. There are over 35 big and small colourful tribes spread over the region. Their rhythmic folk music, dances and dramas are a treat to watch and also provide an insight into the culture of the State.” –  Culture & Heritage | District DURG, Government of Chhattisgarh
https://durg.gov.in/culture-heritage/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7922

“People are poor and are rapidly losing control of natural resources like forests that they have depended upon for generations. This exacerbates the poor status of health in that area.” – Healthcare worker Sulakshana Nandi quoted by Rajni George in “Lord of the jungle and the magic potion” (OPEN Magazine, Profile, 25 July 2014)
https://openthemagazine.com/features/india/lord-of-the-jungle-and-the-magic-potion/#all
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20340

“The homeland of the Muria, Muria Gond, Hill Maria, Bison-horn Maria, Halba, Dhurwa, Bhatra and Dorla tribes, it differs from other tribal enclaves in that there were, concurrently, other diverse traditions from surrounding civilisations and those who ruled the area. For Bastar has a history as varied as that of the rest of India. […] Unlike other tribes who lived in splendid isolation, those of the Bastar region had constant interaction with the ruling powers.” – Nanditha Krishnan reviewing Bastar Folk Art – Shrines, Figurines And Memorials by Michel Postel and Zarine Cooper in “When tribes co-exist with kingdoms” (The Hindu, 6 February 2000) 
https://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/2000/02/06/stories/1306032k.htm
https://worldcat.org/en/title/44475758
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16409

“[Brahma Dev Sharma] realised it was best to ask the tribals what they needed and make plans accordingly rather than thrust one’s own ideas upon them.” – Vijay Lapalikar in an obituary titled “Mahatma of the tribals”, describing B.D. Sharma’s contribution to the emancipation of the tribals, his “dogged fight against the usurpation of tribal resources by the government and private entities.” (The Indian Express, 28 December 2015)
https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/mahatma-of-the-tribals/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22132

“Bastar bronze is unique because of the casting technique and because each craftsman brought his own vision and desires to the figure unlike say, the Chola bronzes which followed an established model. [Yet] their ‘living tradition’ is slowly moving to the realm of ‘folklore’.” – Cornelia Mallebrein, Guest-Curator of the exhibition titled “Street Parade of the Gods”), interviewed in “Tribal tryst” (The Telegraph, 22 July 2012)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16409

Factors for a better life: An analysis of rural poverty and improvements for tribal communities – Chhattisgarh, Kerala, Maharashtra & Mizoram

The abominable plight of migrant workers in recent weeks has invaded television screens and stirred the nation’s conscience. Alas, this is just the tip of the wave of hardships that is sweeping through the country. The situation looks increasingly alarming … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Bastar, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Commentary, Community facilities, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ethnobotany and ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Gadchiroli, Health and nutrition, Homes and utensils, Misconceptions, Modernity, Networking, Organizations, Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTG), Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Video resources - external, Western region –  Western Zonal Council | Comments Off on Factors for a better life: An analysis of rural poverty and improvements for tribal communities – Chhattisgarh, Kerala, Maharashtra & Mizoram

eBook | Demographic Status of Scheduled Tribe Population of India (Census figures 2011): Government of India

Table 1.1 State wise Scheduled Tribe population and decadal change by residence : 2011 (TOTAL) – see PDF for details Table 1.2 All India Population and Total ST Population – Male&Female (Census 2011) – see PDF for details Table 1.3 All India Population and Total … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Bastar, eBook eJournal ePaper, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Names and communities, Narmada, Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTG), Quotes, Regions of India – Tribal heritage & indigenous knowledge, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Women | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on eBook | Demographic Status of Scheduled Tribe Population of India (Census figures 2011): Government of India

“Indigenous women have an integral collective and community role as carers of natural resources and keepers of scientific knowledge”: International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples & Virtual commemoration (9 August) – Unesco

Indigenous women are the backbone of indigenous peoples’ communities and play a crucial role in the preservation and transmission of traditional ancestral knowledge. They have an integral collective and community role as carers of natural resources and keepers of scientific … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Bastar, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, eLearning, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Women | Tagged , , | Comments Off on “Indigenous women have an integral collective and community role as carers of natural resources and keepers of scientific knowledge”: International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples & Virtual commemoration (9 August) – Unesco

“In Bastar, I learned that my books were used to teach English to the tribal children”: Chetan Bhagat on his sense of belonging and literature as entertainment

[…] I know most writers want to be published in the US and UK after becoming famous in India, but for me, it’s very important that even the smallest part of my own country experiences my writings and feels like a … Continue reading

Posted in Bastar, Childhood, Commentary, Education and literacy, Globalization, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Misconceptions, Modernity, Press snippets, Storytelling, Success story | Comments Off on “In Bastar, I learned that my books were used to teach English to the tribal children”: Chetan Bhagat on his sense of belonging and literature as entertainment

Tip | Search articles on tribal history, politics and literature on Ramachandra Guha’s website

Learn more ab0ut the author’s recent publications here: https://ramachandraguha.in/about-the-author >> We met adivasis who had been persecuted by the Naxalites, and other adivasis who had been tormented by the Salwa Judum vigilantes [i.e. “a strange, not to say bizarre, example … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Assimilation, Bastar, Chotanagpur, Colonial policies, Commentary, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Gandhian social movement, Globalization, Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Internet, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Tagore and rural culture, Tips, Trees, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Tip | Search articles on tribal history, politics and literature on Ramachandra Guha’s website