Category Archives: Film

“They have started making films in Gondi. The Bhojpuri film industry is prospering. The language itself is growing, probably the fastest in the country.” – Ganesh [G.N.] Devy quoted by Abhijit Mohanty in “Seven decades after independence, many tribal languages in India face extinction threat” (Down to Earth, 26 August 2020)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/governance/seven-decades-after-independence-many-tribal-languages-in-india-face-extinction-threat-73071
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6879

“Crucial social issues can be raised by fun movies, getting people to change their attitudes. The key is to make it ‘not cool’ to have a feudal backward medieval mindset. I believe India’s youth will come on board, for a variety of reasons.” – Mari Marcel Thekaekara (writer and Co-founder of ACCORD-Nilgiris) in “Can Bollywood shatter India’s caste system?” (New Internationalist, 13 July 2012)
https://www.newint.org/blog/2012/07/13/bollywood-untouchable-force/?utm_medium=ni-email&utm_source=message&utm_campaign=intl-enews-2012-07-26
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6944

“In nearly all tribal villages, men, women and children dance together on many occasions. As with singing and the playing of musical instruments here the average knowledge and skills are generally higher than in any other south Asian communities. Even in rural and tribal villages one can observe that participation in dance has been declining due to the impact of the massive film industry and television.” – Rolf Killius in “Traditional Dance in South Asia”
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16298

Assamese film makers challenge the representation of tribal women in Indian films, including Satyajit Ray’s classic ‘Days And Nights In The Forest’ (Aranyer Din Ratri):
“The immediate impression of Indian movies is that all are depicting an established formula, where the good woman is usually vulnerable and innocent, mostly good looking and also helpless or lacking in intelligence. The bad woman is either sensuous or scary and wicked even in appearance. But Assamese cinema, especially as seen through most of the films taken for the study, has not stuck to this kind of stereotyping in the larger sense. Films in Assam, through the decades, have dealt with serious issues concerning the society, and women in majority of the films, rather than only showing romance and escapism.” – Rashmi Sarmah in “Gender Representation in the Cinema of Assam” (PhD thesis, Assam University 2014), Abstract p. 11

“Days and Nights in the Forest was one of Ray’s most successful films [wherein he introduces] an overt sensuality to his work. […] Feel the tension in this scene [5:10] A beguiling Santal woman [portrayed by a non-Santali actress Simi Garewal] whom [the young men in this story] met is hired to clean their room – and perhaps more. […] No girlfriend of these guys would be allowed to parade themselves in this manner […] In the forest, their true selves are revealed.” – Preston Miller, voice-over for scenes from Satyajit Ray’s 1970 film Aranyer Din Ratri: “Days and Nights in the Forest – introduction”
https://youtu.be/lV8clWi_Vf0
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=15597

Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Director: Sunanda Bhat | Producer: Songline FilmsGenre: Documentary | Produced In: 2012 | Story Teller’s Country: India Synopsis: The film interweaves contemporary narratives with an ancient tribal creation myth to explore the effects of a rapidly changing landscape on lives and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Film, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tourism, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

ePaper | Writing and teaching Santali in different alphabets: A success story calling for a stronger sense of self-confidence – West Bengal

Santali is one of India’s many Adivasi languages. Today, seven different alphabets are used to write in it. Some argue that this great variety does not help the community’s development. | Read the full article by Boro Baski (3,3 MB) … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Childhood, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, eBook eJournal ePaper, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Film, Games and leisure time, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Santali language and literature, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on ePaper | Writing and teaching Santali in different alphabets: A success story calling for a stronger sense of self-confidence – West Bengal

Guda: A film by KJ Baby in the tribal language of the Kattunaikkars – Kerala

`Guda’ ready for screening The shooting of the `Guda’, perhaps the first film in the tribal language of the `Kattunaikkars’, has been completed and the film is all set for screening by the middle of December. K.J. Baby, the director … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Childhood, Customs, Film, Languages and linguistic heritage, Names and communities, Press snippets, Rural poverty, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Tribal identity, Wayanad | Tagged | Comments Off on Guda: A film by KJ Baby in the tribal language of the Kattunaikkars – Kerala

Survey of the living languages of India in present time (PLSI) – carried out by persons who belong to the respective speech communities or have worked closely with them

The People’s Linguistic Survey of India (PLSI) is a comprehensive survey of the living languages of India in present time. The first such survey since George Grierson’s Linguistic Survey of India carried out between 1894 and 1928, the PLSI is being carried out … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany and ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Film, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Networking, Organizations, Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTG), Performing arts, Poetry, Press snippets, Quotes, Regions of India – Tribal heritage & indigenous knowledge, Revival of traditions, Santali language and literature, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Survey of the living languages of India in present time (PLSI) – carried out by persons who belong to the respective speech communities or have worked closely with them

Filmmakers’ interest in tribal culture and biodiversity – communication between Mexico and Jharkhand

A Mexican wave of empathy – Tribal culture strikes a chord with filmmaker couple One may be forgiven for asking “hom what?” But Mexican filmmaker couple Francesco Taboada Tabone and Fernanda Robinson has the answer.  […] The couple, whose films … Continue reading

Posted in Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Cultural heritage, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Film, Languages and linguistic heritage, Media portrayal, Modernity, Networking, Performing arts, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on Filmmakers’ interest in tribal culture and biodiversity – communication between Mexico and Jharkhand