Category Archives: Anthropology

“[F]olklorists, anthropologists and sociocultural experts have intensified efforts to trace the imprints of myths, legends, ballads, songs and folk narratives in the weaves of the North-East. Each pattern is a little capsule of information—containing tales of ancestors, social values, clan practices, and more. Sangma cites the example of the dakmanda, a modern Garo wrap.” – Ramona Sangma quoted by Avantika Bhuyan in Livemint (1 December 2017)
https://www.livemint.com/Leisure/FR23TDZqwz1hDYOlB5mRSN/Folklore-myths-and-handloom.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691

“[I]ndigenous people in India also feel the claustrophobic confines of their identity which has been imposed on them by others, be it the colonial administrator, the colonial anthropologist […].” – Ivy Imogene Hansdak in “Inaugural Speech for the National Conference“ (Tribes In Transition-II” 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23032

“[E]ngaging with the writing of anthropologists writing about tribes is a call to tribal conscience to address these [writers] head-on, without fear, as a way of setting records straight and challenging the primitivism they’ve thrown at us as exotic uncultivated people. This is finally exercising our agency to assert our true identities; a way to liberate the image and reputation of our ancestors and ourselves that has been chained to dehumanization by these writings’ imposed impressions of us.” – Ruby Hembrom (founder-director of Adivaani—a publisher of Adivasi writing), quoted by Richard Kamei (doctoral candidate at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai) in “Uncivilising the Mind: How anthropology shaped the discourse on tribes in India” (Caravan Magazine, 1 March 2021)
https://caravanmagazine.in/books/anthropologists-tribes-india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=8415

“[I]t is very important for anthropologists and other social scientists in contemporary world to study understand and explain the status of tribal youth with respect to its participation and acceptance to the wave of development and modernization and further related changes.” – Subhendu Kumar Acharya & Gautam K Kshatriya in: “Social Transformation, Identity of Indian Tribes in Recent Time: An Anthropological perspective“ (Afro Asian Journal of Anthropology and Social Policy Volume-5, Issue-2 2014)
https://www.academia.edu/9963906
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20371

“Facilitate integration of tribal medical system and modern medicine”: Undernutrition and childhood morbidities due to inaction

Indian J Med Res. 2005 Jul ;122 (1):43-7 16106089  Cit:8 Undernutrition & childhood morbidities among tribal preschool children. [My paper] V G Rao, Rajeev Yadav, C K Dolla, Surendra Kumar, M K Bhondeley, Mahendra UkeyRegional Medical Research Centre for Tribals … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Childhood and children, eBook & eJournal, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Literature and bibliographies, Names and communities, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rural poverty | Tagged | Comments Off on “Facilitate integration of tribal medical system and modern medicine”: Undernutrition and childhood morbidities due to inaction

“I feel that you are a part of me and I will never forget you”: Tribal elder in a travel account by historian Runoko Rashidi – Looking at India through African Eyes

As I am now in the process of completing the finishing touches on a French language collection of my essays on the African presence in Asia I find myself reviewing and evaluating the body of work that I have been … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Commentary, Customs, History, Names and communities, Networking, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Social conventions, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal elders, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on “I feel that you are a part of me and I will never forget you”: Tribal elder in a travel account by historian Runoko Rashidi – Looking at India through African Eyes

India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Bihar

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Assimilation, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Museum collections - India, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Northern region – Northern Zonal Council, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Regions of India, Success story, Tips, Tourism, Tribal identity | Comments Off on India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Bihar

eBook | The No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples

This guide looks beyond the exotic images tracing the story of different indigenous people from their first contact with explorers and colonizers to the present day. Much of this story is told by the indigenous people themselves and they present … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Democracy, eBook & eJournal, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on eBook | The No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples

Research on populations of different social rank: “The genetic heritage of the earliest settlers persists”

The word “tribe” itself, in fact, has always been a contentious term. Due to the lack of an adequate term, indigenous people chose to adopt it to identify their place in the world. The narrative is changing today. […] Tribes … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Customs, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Quotes, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Research on populations of different social rank: “The genetic heritage of the earliest settlers persists”