Category Archives: Nature and wildlife

“We – forest-dependent communities, supported by others – declare: The natural forests are a nurturing mother to us. Our very identities, cultures and world-views are closely linked to the forests that provide our primary needs. […] Our cultures discourage greed, the root of scarcity, harm and sorrow.” – An appeal for a new consciousness of empathy and wise governance to protect our rich natural heritage, culture, and harmonious collective future by Kavitha (“Forest Foods & Ecology” Festival, December 12 to 14, 2014 at Sri Aurobindo Society, New Delhi)
www.kisanswaraj.in/2014/12/31/forest-foods-and-ecology/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16371

“There is a need to explore the tribal consciousness in the backdrop of climate change, development, and deforestation.” – Deepanwita Gita Niyogi in “India’s Adivasi Identity in Crisis” (Pulitzer Center May 27, 2021)
https://pulitzercenter.org/projects/indias-adivasi-identity-crisis
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=17554

“The increasing politicisation and commercialisation of the rural areas, the breakdown of traditions, and demands made by the growing human and livestock populations have all contributed to the present situation. The net result: wildlife, wildlife habitats, and the resource base of rural and tribal communities continue to be destroyed.” – Pankaj Sekhsaria and Ashish Kothari in “For a natural balance” (Frontline Magazine, 27 May 2000)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1719

“Indigenous languages are connected to nature. With the ability, for instance, to recognise over a thousand plants and know the medicinal uses of each one, the level of nature knowledge is far beyond what most major world languages have.” – Lexicographer David Harrison interviewed by Srijana Mitra Das in “Indigenous languages have wisdom that can save us from climate crisis” (Times of India, 23 January 2021)
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indigenous-languages-have-wisdom-that-can-save-us-from-climate-crisis/articleshow/80411082.cms
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=46777

“First and foremost, people, particularly indigenous or tribal groups that number in millions live inside or at the periphery of protected areas, and rely on biodiversity for sustaining their livelihoods. Such people have been largely disenfranchised and have no role in management. In fact, in many cases, centralised management of biodiversity has created conflicts between people and managers of protected areas. These conflicts have endangered rather than enhanced conservation.” – Kamaljit S. Bawa (President of the Bangalore-based Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment) in “Our biodiversity, our life, our future” (The Hindu, 2 August 2010)
https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/energy-and-environment/article547960.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5026

“Irrespective of differences in lifestyle, all tribals possess an unconditional love for nature.” – Tribal scholar writer K. Vasamalli on the occasion of a two-day meet organised by Sahitya Akademi in association with Jharkhandi Bhasha Sahitya Sanskriti Akhra to commemorate the birth centenary of Alice Ekka, the country’s first acclaimed woman tribal writer (The Telegraph, Jharkhand, 8 September 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22856

“For centuries tribals have lived peacefully with nature. In this period of ecological catastrophes like climate change, the tribal way of life shows the alternatives we need to promote peace, sustainability and justice. Precisely at the time when we need to learn from tribals, to defend the future of our civilisation, and humanity the future of the tribals is itself under threat.” – Declaration on Adivasi Swaraj by Navdanya (a network of seed keepers and organic producers across 16 states in India)
https://navdanya.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=79:declaration-on-adivasi-swaraj&catid=12:earth-democracy
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6068

“Historically, India’s environmental movement has revolved around wildlife conservation — tigers, leopards, elephants — yet there was little inclusion of sustainability in our models of development. […] We’ll teach about edible landscaping, butterfly gardens, sensory gardens, vertical landscapes, and urban bee keeping. We’ll need these concepts as the population rises and the land area shrinks. ” – Rashneh Pardiwala in “Why It’s Hard to ‘Change Mindsets’ on Environmental Protection Among India’s Elites”; interview on environmental education at her Centre for Environmental Research and Education (CERE) in Mumbai (Asia Blog, 27 July 2015)
https://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/interview-why-its-hard-change-mindsets-environmental-protection-among-indias-elites
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

“The hermitage [asrama] is set so deep in the forest that it is almost another world, enveloped in a translucent green of sun and trees. […] The asrama is at one level an intrusion into the forest by the people of the grama [village], an intrusion sought to be stemmed by those living in the forest. […] Was the threat to forest dwellers a way of preventing the illegal clearing of forests and of curbing shifting cultivation?” – Romila Thapar (Emeritus Professor of History, Jawaharlal Nehru University) in “Perceiving the Forest: Early India Studies” (History, February 2001)
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/025764300101700101
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5851

“India has arguably had the technology to wipe out most animals for centuries, but more that half of the world tigers and two-thirds of the worlds Asian Elephants continue to live alongside people, themselves packed in at about 450 in every square kilometre. Should the Indian conservation ethos build on this long religious and cultural ‘tolerance’ to wildlife or should we completely ignore it and copy everyone else in the world?” – Tarsh Thekaekara (Director, Shola Trust) in “The Human Elephant (Wildlife) Relationship” (May 2014)
www.thesholatrust.org/elephants/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22634

“There are two species of crocodiles, the smaller and more common, generally six or seven feet in length, and not ordinarily dangerous to human life; the larger reaching the length of eighteen or twenty feet. The latter are more dangerous; still, one does not often hear of lives being lost by them in this part of India”. – Achuthsankar S. Nair in “Guardian angels of the river” (The Hindu, 12 October 2012)
https://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-metroplus/guardian-angels-of-the-river/article3989657.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=14167

“The Centrally Sponsored Umbrella Scheme of Integrated Development of Wildlife Habitats […] would result in resource generation through tourist visits, thereby fostering in securing tiger source areas and other areas important for wildlife conservation, besides being helpful in sustaining life support systems as well as ensuring the food, water and livelihood security. The implementation of the schemes would be done through the respective States in designated Tiger Reserves, Protected Areas and Elephant Reserves.”  – Government of India’s Umbrella Scheme of Integrated Development of Wildlife Habitats beyond 12th Plan (Press Information Bureau, 5 September 2018)
https://pib.gov.in/Pressreleaseshare.aspx?PRID=1545068
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4226

India’s tribal cultural heritage – Uttar Pradesh

Uttar Pradesh is the most populous state of the country but has a small tribal population [namely] five major Scheduled Tribes and about 18 other tribal groups. Source: “An analytical study of socio-economic conditions of tribal farmers in Bijnor district … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Cultural heritage, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Languages and linguistic heritage, Nature and wildlife, Northern region – Northern Zonal Council, Organizations, Regions of India – Tribal heritage & indigenous knowledge, Resources, Success story | Comments Off on India’s tribal cultural heritage – Uttar Pradesh

Video | Marriage customs of the Santals: A large mural created by village artists to express their cultural identity – West Bengal

Marriage Reception A Santal marriage takes five days and involves various, often complex, rituals. On the day of the Gidi-chumara (Marriage Reception) the women arrive to bless the bride and groom with grass and grains of rice which are kept … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Education and literacy, Literature and bibliographies, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Santal Parganas, Santali language and literature, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Tagore and rural culture, Tourism, Trees, Video resources - external, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | Marriage customs of the Santals: A large mural created by village artists to express their cultural identity – West Bengal

Sharing valuable rice varieties with farmers: Biodiversity for the sake of “vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations” – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha Maharashtra & West Bengal

IN BRIEF India originally possessed some 110,000 landraces of rice with diverse and valuable properties. These include enrichment in vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations. The Green Revolution covered fields with a few … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Biodiversity, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ethnobotany and ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Resources, Success story, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Sharing valuable rice varieties with farmers: Biodiversity for the sake of “vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations” – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha Maharashtra & West Bengal

Tip | Which are India’s endangered languages? (interactive map)

India’s endangered languages “Kolami, Koya, Gondi, Kuvi, Kui, Yerukala, Savara, Parji, Kupia. Do these names ring a bell? No, right? They are all native tribal tongues that have immensely contributed to enrich the language and culture of Telugu people. But … Continue reading

Posted in Education and literacy, Endangered language, FAQ, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Languages and linguistic heritage, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Resources, Rural poverty, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | Which are India’s endangered languages? (interactive map)

Treating visitors to Te Puia geothermal park to an exhaustive peek into Maori culture, lore and legend: Women guides of the Te Arawa tribe – New Zealand

New Zealand smokes, it smells and then stuns you with its geysers, hot springs and boiling mud pools […] Rotorua is New Zealand’s geothermal wonderland. It is located on North Island at the southernmost tip of the Pacific Ring of … Continue reading

Posted in Eco tourism, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Storytelling, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on Treating visitors to Te Puia geothermal park to an exhaustive peek into Maori culture, lore and legend: Women guides of the Te Arawa tribe – New Zealand