Category Archives: Economy and development

“For how long will I have to/ Bear the pain of development
Or is it that I will be done to death/ Before attaining development?”
Quote from a poem by Ram Dayal Munda titled “The Pain of Development (Vikas Ka Dard)”
https://joharjournal.org/ram-dayal-munda/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4548

“In India, mobile peoples including former hunters-gatherers and criminal tribes, now denotified, have been the primary victims of both democracy and development.” – Review by Ashish Saxena (Department of Sociology, University of Allahabad) on The subaltern speaks: Truth and ethics in Mahasweta Devi’s fiction on tribals (2016) by Sanatan Bhowal, a book which “looks at the ideas of different thinkers with respect to selected texts of Mahasweta Devi’s fiction on tribal life”
https://orientblackswan.com/pressreviews/The%20Subaltern%20Speaks.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20733

“Studies show that the development projects exclude and alienate Adivasi communities in India and they describe the history of Adivasi development in India in terms of material deprivation and cultural marginalisation. While the socio-political and cultural exclusion is acknowledged as a universal feature of Adivasi life, the everyday experience of their exclusion differs among different Adivasi communities.” – Abstract for PhD thesis by Leena Abraham “Perceptions and experiences of development: a study of two tribal communities in Wayanad district, Kerala” (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, 2013)
http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in:8080/jspui/handle/10603/17821
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5169

“[I]f one is poor in India … one is more likely to live in rural areas, more likely to be a member of the Scheduled Caste or Tribe or other socially discriminated group, more likely to be malnourished, sick and in poor health, more likely to be illiterate or poorly educated and with low skills, more likely to live in certain states (such as … Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, and also Orissa) than in others.” — Economist T. N. Srinivasan quoted in India after Gandhi: The History of the World’s Largest Democracy by Ramachandra Guha (Picador India, 2011), p. 711 (explaining the growing migration from poorer areas to richer ones)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13755

“There was a conversation I had in Marathwada, during a drought, with an old farmer. He picked up a clump of soil and told me, ‘This is what it is all about’. […] What the peasant was telling me was, ‘A civilisation that does not look after soil is a doomed civilisation [and] going to face the grave danger of just not being able to survive any more.” – Playwright Ramu Ramanathan interviewed by Dipanita Nath in “I know people who have chosen to be silent, some out of fear and others just out of being deadened” (Indian Express, 28 October 2020)
https://indianexpress.com/article/cities/pune/i-know-people-who-have-chosen-to-be-silent-some-out-of-fear-and-others-just-out-of-being-deadened-6902500/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5576

“Some goals are clear: cancellation of Third World debt, for instance. In India, for ending the indebtedness of our own Fourth World.” – P. Sainath in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/

“Unlikely as it may seem, indigenous people are at the forefront of the struggle to save the planet. Their courage and their worldview can inspire those of us who don’t think life on earth should be determined by the boardroom bottomline. We, in our turn, have a role to play in defending the defenders.” – Vanessa Baird in New Internationalist (print ed., issue 446, October 2011), p. 15
https://newint.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4429

“Pervasive corruption, one source of the failure of the Indian bureaucracy, systematically disempowers the poor by making essential (and supposedly free) goods and services unaffordable. Siphoned off on their way down through the system, government funds fail to reach their intended beneficiaries, for whom they could make a life or death difference. Concentrated on their way up, bribes grease the wheels. The bureaucracy functions best for those who have political connections, cultural capital, and financial clout. […] Demeaning representations and bureaucratic techniques of governance normalize the malign neglect of the poor.” – Book review of Red Tape: Bureaucracy, Structural Violence, and Poverty in India by Akhil Gupta in Asian Ethnology 73/1–2, 2014, pp. 312-3
https://nirc.nanzan-u.ac.jp/nfile/4372
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22767

“India’s political transformation has been slow and hence it has enabled the sustenance of regressive elements. Elite control/capture still persists in parts of the country. Sections of non-elites are not mobilised politically. The competitive politics is yet to become intense in a few states. Even when there is competition at the national level, a substantial section of voters in rural areas do not experience it in their democratic choices. The size of the middle-class continues to be small in most parts of the country. All parties have played a role in the stagnation of the political development in the country. […] The BJP will fail (even if it may continue as a national party) if it is espousing the upper-caste patriarchal values, as these would not enable building a strong and vibrant India.” – V. Santhakumar (Azim Premji University) in: “Why am I not against the BJP?” (Economics in Action, 30 January 2021)
https://vsanthakumar.wordpress.com/2021/01/30/why-am-i-not-against-the-bjp/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22893

“People attack me for being a Marxist. I’ll tell you a story. There is a village near Khandala where the caste-families evicted forty Untouchable families who were trying to build a road. The case was put to the Central Government two years ago. One could fight the British, but one can’t fight them, because they are petty bourgeois, they are nothing, and one can’t fight the wind. I have bought two villages, and the Untouchables have moved into them. But I can do nothing to get the petty bureaucracy out. If I lived in England I shouldn’t worry, because there the bureaucracy seems to work. Here it doesn’t, and I protest, and they call me a Marxist.” – Mulk Raj Anand quoted by Dom Moraes in Gone Away (London, 1960), p. 23
http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/18773819
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22767

“The moral standard of state and society can be deduced from the way people are treated who are not productive anymore and have no assets of their own. Missing the means for self-providence includes all those among the labouring poor who are disabled either because of old age, defective health or other handicaps that prevent them for working for their livelihood.” – Jan Breman in “Caring for destitution or not?” (T.G. Narayanan Memorial Lecture on Social Deprivation, The Hindu, January 19, 2013)
https://www.thehindu.com/news/resources/caring-for-destitution-or-not/article4323348.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=9731

India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Nagaland

“The Dept of Social Welfare, Government of Nagaland was established in the year 1968 with the sole purpose of implementing social welfare schemes. Presently the department is looking after five different ministries [including Ministry of Tribal Affairs].” – Learn more | Govt., NGOs … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Museum collections - India, Organizations, Regions of India, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Success story, Tips, Tourism, Tribal identity | Comments Off on India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Nagaland

eJournal | Special issue dedicated to the study of tribal culture in India (open access) – Asian Ethnology

Kondagaon Dance Competition 2004 from Asian Ethnology on Vimeo. Editors’ Note Frank J. Korom (Boston University) & Benjamin Dorman (Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture), 28 September 2014, Nagoya, Japan This year we bring you a special double issue dedicated to … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Bastar, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Colonial policies, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, eBook & eJournal, Economy and development, History, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Networking, Nilgiri, Performing arts, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Tribal identity, Video resources - external, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on eJournal | Special issue dedicated to the study of tribal culture in India (open access) – Asian Ethnology

ACCORD – Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development

ACCORD (Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development) was born in November 1985 out of the realisation that the adivasis of the Gudalur Valley were being cheated and exploited and might soon disappear off the face of the earth. Our … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Modernity, Networking, Nilgiri, Organizations, Rural poverty, Websites by tribal communities, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on ACCORD – Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development

eBook | Toda cultural history (Nilgiri) – Tamil Nadu

Until now, historians and anthropologists believed that Todas, a tribal group in the higher altitudes of the Nilgiris, reached there about 2,000 years ago. A new study by Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru researchers shows the community was already settled … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Colonial policies, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, eBook & eJournal, Economy and development, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Homes and utensils, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Museum collections - India, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Quotes, Trees, Tribal identity, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on eBook | Toda cultural history (Nilgiri) – Tamil Nadu

Video | Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest: A documentary on forest Rights by Purabi Bose – Rajasthan

Forest Rights: Jung Jungle aur Jungle ke logo ka. Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest, Rajasthan, India. A short video documentary (14mins) film ‘Forest Rights’ is produced and directed by Purabi Bose based on research field work data collection. … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western region –  Western Zonal Council, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest: A documentary on forest Rights by Purabi Bose – Rajasthan