Category Archives: Gandhian social movement

“Our idea of development is based on a very old idea taken up by many great minds such as Mahatma Gandhi and [the poet] Rabindranath Tagore. […] It is about development from within. Development through the strength of the community’s own.” – Santal educationist Boro Baski quoted in “The Indian school where Indigenous children are ‘never outsiders” by Rosemary Marandi (Al Jazeera Education, 10 February 2020)
https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/indian-school-indigenous-children-outsiders-200128131128144.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=34790

“The tribal culture at its best provides a living example of the Gandhian concept of trusteeship […] In cross-cultural settings, individual and group relations among tribals are valued on trust rather than on dominance.” – Lachman Khubchandani in Indigenous Peoples: Responding to Human Ecology (Bhasha Centre and CIIL, 2009), pp. 14-15
http://bhashaebooks.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7015

“Freedom from British rule meant nothing [to Gandhi] if it did not liberate Indians from hunger and give them an improved life. A leader had to identify completely with the poor, not through the easy means of a sermon but by sacrificing comfort and forsaking the temptations of money. This was the minimum, non-negotiable condition.” – MJ Akbar in “The Rediscovery of Nehru
How Nehruvians revised their idol” (OpenTheMagazine.com, 13 August 2021)
https://openthemagazine.com/cover-stories/the-rediscovery-of-nehru/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=30463

“Charity destroys, work builds.” – Social and environmental activist Baba Amte (who “exemplified the humanitarian politics of Gandhiji”), quoted by Medha Padkar in “The inspiring gardener” (DownToEarth, 15 March 2008)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/coverage/baba-amte-the-inspiring-gardener-4264
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21404

“[O]ther countries had factories, mines and airlines. India had millions—especially, but not only, female millions—who were experts in handicrafts that went far beyond Gandhi’s spinning wheel.” – Feminist writer Gloria Steinem reviewing “A Passionate Life: Writings by and on Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay” by Ellen Carol Dubois and Vinay Lal in Openmagazine (7 April 2017)
https://www.openthemagazine.com/article/books/kamaladevi-chattopadhyay-the-last-teacher
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20948

“Air is free to all but if it is polluted it harms our health… Next comes water… From now on we must take up the effort to secure water. Councillors are servants of the people and we have a right to question them.” – Mohandas K. Gandhi, Ahmedabad address on 1 January 1918; quoted by his grandson, Gopalkrishna Gandhi, in “On another New Year’s Day: Mahatma Gandhi’s ‘khorak’ a 100 years ago” (The Hindu, 1 January 2018)
https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/on-another-new-years-day/article22339609.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24087

“Freedom of opinion and freedom of association are the two lungs that are absolutely necessary for a man to breathe the oxygen of liberty.” – Gandhi on 28 December 1921, quoted by SN Sahu (press secretary to President KR Narayanan) in “Why Gandhi’s use of oxygen as a metaphor during the freedom struggle has resonance for India today” (Scroll, 11 July 2021)
https://scroll.in/article/997802/why-gandhis-use-of-oxygen-as-a-metaphor-during-the-freedom-struggle-has-resonance-for-india-today
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4395

“If we ignore the message of Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, on the basis of what we gained our freedom, and on the basis of which we enjoy respect in the world, we will not just jeopardise that freedom and respect, we will be jeopardising the very future of our civilisation. Gandhi had warned us that the resource-hungry, consumerist model rests on war and creates ecological disasters. It is this dual threat of conflicts between people and violence against nature that can destroy civilisation. For centuries tribals have lived peacefully with nature. In this period of ecological catastrophes like climate change, the tribal way of life shows the alternatives we need to promote peace, sustainability and justice.” – Declaration on Adivasi Swaraj by Navdanya (co-founded by physicist Vandana Shiva who also founded the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy (RFSTN), an organization devoted to developing sustainable methods of agriculture)
https://navdanya.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=79:declaration-on-adivasi-swaraj&catid=12:earth-democracy
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6068

“Gandhi believed that giving more importance, value and relevance to practical skills, and applying traditional knowledge to solving day-to-day problems were essential for the development of rural India.” – Bunker Roy (founder of Barefoot College, which helps rural communities becomes self-sufficient)
https://www.barefootcollege.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=12993

“I wonder how [Gandhi] would have struggled to even comprehend the ‘hardheartedness’ of the educated in India today. Let there be no mistake: what really ails Indian education is the fact that at its center is the ‘undeveloped heart’.” – Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “The Undeveloped Heart: Gandhi on Education” (15 October 2019)
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/the-undeveloped-heart-gandhi-on-education/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=29790

“The slogan today is no longer merely ‘Asia for the Asians’ or ‘Africa for the Africans’ but the unity of all the oppressed races of the earth.” – Mahatma Gandhi addressing two stalwarts of the struggle struggle in South Africa against apartheid), quoted by Vinay Lal in “The Solidarity of Oppressed Peoples: A Tribute to E S Reddy, Anti-Apartheid Activist” (23 November 2020)
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/11/23/the-solidarity-of-oppressed-peoples-a-tribute-to-e-s-reddy-anti-apartheid-activist/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23349

The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

By J.J. Roy Burman, Mainstream, Vol XLVII, No 32, July 25, 2009 In India the term ‘Adivasi’ has gained immense popularity in the last few decades to identify the tribes. This term is more commonly brought to use by the NGO … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council | Comments Off on The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

Selected writings by anthropologist Verrier Elwin (1902-64)

The Oxford India Elwinby G.N. Devy (ed.) 440 Pages | 80 line illus. & photographsISBN: 9780195697919, Rs. 795From presenting Elwin’s work among the tribal peoples of central India, to affording glimpses of his seminal work on the unique institution of the ghotul among … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Bastar, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Social conventions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Selected writings by anthropologist Verrier Elwin (1902-64)

The main criteria adopted for identification of ‘Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups’ (PVTG) – Government of India

The Dhebar commission (1960) and the Shilu Ao (1969) team recommended the Government of India that primitive tribal communities should be taken as a special category for which special programmes would have to be initiated as quickly as possible for … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Colonial policies, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Misconceptions, Modernity, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty | Comments Off on The main criteria adopted for identification of ‘Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups’ (PVTG) – Government of India

Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

There’s much to learn from the positive contributions made by tribal communities on a daily basis. To start with, let’s learn from insiders and others who have dedicated their lives to ensuring that a precious heritage will continue to make … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, FAQ, Gandhian social movement, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

The relevance of Gandhi’s legacy for solving modern India’s socio-economic problems: Addressing the needs of peasants, labourers, students and tribals

IS there such a thing as Gandhi’s legacy?For fifty years we have enshrined him. We must now enfranchise him again.by Gopalkrishna Gandhi [1997] IS there such a thing as Gandhi’s legacy?There is, well, the name; a legacy for some. Legacy … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Commentary, Community facilities, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Misconceptions, Modernity, Narmada, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Press snippets, Rural poverty, Women | Comments Off on The relevance of Gandhi’s legacy for solving modern India’s socio-economic problems: Addressing the needs of peasants, labourers, students and tribals