Category Archives: Social conventions

“At a time when hate is being manufactured, it’s important to tell these stories of love and how widespread it is and that it’s not just a flash in the pan.” […] According to the India Human Development Survey, only about 5% of marriages are inter-caste. Interfaith unions are even rarer – one study put them at just over 2.2%. And those choosing to marry outside of these boundaries often face violence [as] interfaith marriages – especially those involving Hindu women and Muslim men – are being ascribed a much more sinister motive.” Geeta Pandey in “India Love Project: The Instagram account telling tales of ‘forbidden’ love” (BBC News, 10 November 2020)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-54869565
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22373

“Casteism is the investment in keeping the hierarchy as it is in order to maintain your own ranking, advantage, privilege, or to elevate yourself above others or keep others beneath you …. For this reason, many people—including those we might see as good and kind people—could be casteist, meaning invested in keeping the hierarchy as it is or content to do nothing to change it, but not racist in the classical sense, not active and openly hateful of this or that group.” – Isabel Wilkerson’s book Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents reviewed by Dilip Mandal in The Print, 23 August 2020)
https://theprint.in/opinion/oprah-winfrey-wilkerson-caste-100-us-ceos-indians-wont-talk-about-it/487143/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24460

“The Indian constitution had to empower the state to enter into the realm of Indian society and transform it by eradicating deeply embedded economic, political and social hierarchies.” – Centre for Law and Policy Research (a Bengaluru-based think-tank), quoted by Rinchen Norbu Wangchuk in The Better India, 22 January 2019
https://www.thebetterindia.com/170247/india-constitution-inspiration-acts-rights-ambedkar-republic-day/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=34135

“Yet despite the common belief that education will improve attitudes to female children, the data shows that India’s least educated social groups are those with better sex ratios. The child sex ratio (girls for every 1000 boys aged 1-6) is 957 for STs and 933 for SCs as compared to 910 for “others”. In urban areas, the child sex ratio of the non-scheduled caste, non-tribal population is just over 900, meaning there are 100 less girls for every 1000 boys. [M]ost tribal communities either do not know of pre-natal sex determination, or do not have access to it” – S. Rukmini in “Higher sex ratio among tribal, SC groups: [2011] census” (The Hindu, 31 October 2013)
https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/higher-sex-ratio-among-tribal-sc-groups-census/article5300478.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22068

“With modernity and development creeping in and growing contact with the outside world, things are changing in rural and tribal India. Traditions and folklore are being modified and girls in villages are no longer interested in getting a tattoo. Nowhere is that more evident than among the girls of the Baiga tribe in central India.” – Keya Pandey, a social anthropologist at Lucknow University in “‘Don’t brand me’: The Indian women saying no to forced tattoos” (BBC News Delhi, 4 October 2017)
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-41466751
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25251

“There are myths indicating that Asuras were made slaves by Aryans. These slave races are still struggling for annihilation of caste system. They live in abject poverty. Their latest names are ‘Scheduled Castes’, ‘Scheduled Tribes, and ‘Other Backward Castes’. They are yet to know about ‘human rights’. The fact is that aboriginals were enslaved and subjected to inhuman treatment through centuries. Most of them still live in villages and they are coerced to live in wretched and inhuman conditions.” – Posted by Bhushan (MEGHnet, 1 January 2011)
https://meghnet.blogspot.com/2011/01/kolikori-of-india-we-call-them.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=2918

Video | Trailer to “Have you seen the arana?” – Kerala

“The stories of ancestors and their discoveries give the film a mystical quality and work like a poetic refrain” – Review by Bikas Mishra Three narratives from distinct landscapes – rice fields, forest and plantations – reveal different ways of engaging with … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood and children, Customs, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Elephant, Fashion and design, Film, Health and nutrition, History, Media portrayal, Modernity, Organizations, Rural poverty, Social conventions, Success story, Tourism, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Wayanad, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Trailer to “Have you seen the arana?” – Kerala

Teaching Santal children by Boro Baski

Though India is hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic, our small cluster of two Adivasi villages in West Bengal has not suffered infections yet. We do feel the economic impacts of course. […] Farm work has continued quietly. To many … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, Eastern region, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Globalization, Government of India, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Museum collections - India, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Social conventions, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tribal elders, Video contents, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Teaching Santal children by Boro Baski

Video | People of the hills celebrate their annual Wangala festival in Asanang: “We Garos are tuned into world music and culture” – Meghalaya

PHEROZE L. VINCENT, The Hindu, November 24, 2012 | To read the full article and view more photos, click here >> The Garo tribe of Western Meghalaya celebrates the winter harvest with a three-day festival. […] Alva Sangma, the editor of … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Cultural heritage, De- and re-tribalisation, Dress and ornaments, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Seven Sister States, Social conventions, Storytelling, Video resources - external, Women | Tagged , | Comments Off on Video | People of the hills celebrate their annual Wangala festival in Asanang: “We Garos are tuned into world music and culture” – Meghalaya

“Tribal communities are a standing example” – National workshop highlights the role of tribal women in the preservation of eco historic cultural heritage in India

A. Shrikumar, The Hindu, Madurai, January 27, 2017 | To read the full article, click here >>Mari Marcel Thekaekara, writer and Co-founder of ACCORD-Nilgiris says the tribal communities are a standing example of how women play a major role in preservation of eco … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Elephant, History, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Nilgiri, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seasons and festivals, Social conventions, Southern region, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal elders, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on “Tribal communities are a standing example” – National workshop highlights the role of tribal women in the preservation of eco historic cultural heritage in India

Video | The representation of tribal women in Indian cinema: A comparison between Assamese cinema and Satyajith Ray’s classic “Days And Nights In The Forest” – Assam & West Bengal

The immediate impression of Indian movies is that all are depicting an established formula, where the good woman is usually vulnerable and innocent, mostly good looking and also helpless or lacking in intelligence. The bad woman is either sensuous or … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Eastern region, Film, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Resources, Social conventions, Storytelling, Video resources - external, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | The representation of tribal women in Indian cinema: A comparison between Assamese cinema and Satyajith Ray’s classic “Days And Nights In The Forest” – Assam & West Bengal