Category Archives: Community facilities

“Increasingly available facilities are pushing the educated and informed tribal groups to seek (new) identity among majority in the Indian society. […] So it is very important for anthropologists and other social scientists in contemporary world to study understand and explain the status of tribal youth with respect to its participation and acceptance to the wave of development and modernization and further related changes. […] Fading importance of various social structures and institutions are few of the different dimensions of understanding among elderly sections in different tribal communities about the new aspiration of tribal youth.” – Subhendu Kumar Acharya & Gautam K Kshatriya in: “Social Transformation, Identity of Indian Tribes in Recent Time: An Anthropological perspective“ (Afro Asian Journal of Anthropology and Social Policy Volume-5, Issue-2 2014)
https://www.academia.edu/9963906/Social_Transformation_Identity_of_Indian_Tribes_in_Recent_Time_An_Anthropological_perspective
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20371

“Santiniketan is in many ways a pioneering step in the field of education and rural reconstruction. Located in the heart of nature amongst Hindu, Muslim, and Santali villages which were in ‘serious decline’ despite a rich cultural heritage, the school, from almost its beginning aimed to combine education with a sense of obligation towards the larger civic community.” – Partha Mitter in The triumph of modernism: India’s artists and the avant-garde, 1922-1947
Santiniketan – UNESCO World Heritage Centre
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4348

“True self-reliance won’t come from relentless industrialisation, but from localisation and decentralisation, as demonstrated by these remarkable stories of empowered rural communities.” – Ashish Kothari, Kalpavriksh (Pune-based NGO)
https://www.thehindu.com/society/what-does-self-reliance-really-mean-amazing-stories-emerge-from-indias-villages/article31756580.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=34172

Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

Adivasi people: proud not primitive | Read the full article >> […] Defining what’s special about India’s adivasi or indigenous people is complicated. People, mostly anthropologists and human rights defenders, who know adivasis and have worked closely with them, also tend … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Assimilation, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Organizations, Poetry, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Topics and issues, Tourism, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

There’s much to learn from the positive contributions made by tribal communities on a daily basis. To start with, let’s learn from insiders and others who have dedicated their lives to ensuring that a precious heritage will continue to make … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, FAQ, Gandhian social movement, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

“Development is invariably a form of change, but not all forms of change can be termed development”: A context for India’s tribal heritage, past and present

A useful analytical framework to study the deprivation and development of Adivasis in the larger Indian context. THE selection of papers in this volume, presented at the International Seminar on “Adivasi/Scheduled Tribe Communities in India: Development and Change” in August … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Tips, Topics and issues, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on “Development is invariably a form of change, but not all forms of change can be termed development”: A context for India’s tribal heritage, past and present

Museums of Happiness & No Going Back – Peer Learning Programme

The peer learning programme builds on the particular power of museums to draw on past stories of rapid transition and transformation; and inspire museums and their communities to shape new stories and actions to address the climate and ecological emergency. … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Commentary, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, History, Modernity, Museum collections - general, Museum collections - India, Networking, Organizations, Performing arts, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Success story | Comments Off on Museums of Happiness & No Going Back – Peer Learning Programme

“Who are Scheduled Tribes?”: Clarifications by the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes – Government of India

The framers of the Constitution took note of the fact that certain communities in the country were suffering from extreme social, educational and economic backwardness on account of the primitive agricultural practices, lack of infrastructure facilities and geographical isolation. The … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, FAQ, Government of India, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on “Who are Scheduled Tribes?”: Clarifications by the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes – Government of India