Category Archives: Forest Rights Act (FRA)

“Our forests are ours again. In 2006, the government finally accepted the historical injustice meted out to Adivasis and passed the Forest Rights Act thus recognizing our rights to forests.” – Adivasi Munnetra Sangam (photo caption, 2017 calendar)

“Though the institution of Forest Rights Act is a policy action on the part of governments, local mobilisation among Tribal population, and non-governmental organisations have played an important role in its effective implementation. This area [the Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra] has witnessed different forms of social mobilization under leaders coming from tribal communities.” – Prof. V. Santhakumar (Azim Premji University, “It is possible to have a better life for Scheduled Tribes in India!”, 4 May 2018)

“The Act makes concrete provisions to allow adivasis to enter the forest and continue using forest produce, on which they have depended for generations [like] the basket that was once woven in bamboo that was collected from the forest is now being replaced by plastic ones bought from the market.” – Priyashri Mani (“Home is where the forest is”, Accord Gudalur)

Nomination of Dr Madegowda (Soliga): Participatory resource monitoring, implementation of the Forest Rights Act and welfare schemes – Karnataka

Learn more about tribal communities, biodiversity and wildlife related issues across Karnataka and the Western Ghats (e.g. search for “Karnataka Adivasi Abhivrudhi Mandali”, “Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve”, “man animal conflict Karnataka”, “Karnataka tribal welfare”, “Valmiki Scheduled Tribes”, “forest based … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Hyderabad biodiversity pledge, Maps, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Southern region, Tiger, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Nomination of Dr Madegowda (Soliga): Participatory resource monitoring, implementation of the Forest Rights Act and welfare schemes – Karnataka

Learn more about tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Central region, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Democracy, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Multi-lingual education, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Narmada, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Resources, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Tips, Tourism, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Learn more about tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh

Adivasis (Scheduled Tribes) are the largest tribal population in the world – World Directory of Minorities

Profile | To read the full article, click here >> Adivasis is the collective name used for the many indigenous peoples of India. The term Adivasi derives from the Hindi word ‘adi’ which means of earliest times or from the … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on Adivasis (Scheduled Tribes) are the largest tribal population in the world – World Directory of Minorities

“We are strong and industrious people”: Migration in a region suitable for tribal settlement, the cultivation of paddy and pulses, and rich in forest products – Odisha (Orissa)

Neoliberal Development, Displacement and Resistance movement: The Case of Kalinga Nagar Industrial complex, Odisha, India | To read the full paper by Dinabandhu Sahoo and Niharranjan Mishra (NIT Rourkela), click here >> The tribals of Kalinga Nagar have been migrated … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Eastern region, Economy and development, Education and literacy, ePub, Ethnobotany, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Health and nutrition, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Resources, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tips, Tourism, Tribal identity, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on “We are strong and industrious people”: Migration in a region suitable for tribal settlement, the cultivation of paddy and pulses, and rich in forest products – Odisha (Orissa)

Time for an apology to the world’s Indigenous peoples: Residential schools, exploitation of natural resources and ill treatment in the name of “progress”

Excerpt from lithub.comMarina Endicott on the Forced Schooling of Indigenous Canadian | Read the full article >> In Canada we have been struggling for many years to uncover and acknowledge the history of residential schools. In the original treaties between … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Commentary, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Misconceptions, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on Time for an apology to the world’s Indigenous peoples: Residential schools, exploitation of natural resources and ill treatment in the name of “progress”