Category Archives: Dress and ornaments

“We have forgotten the habit of putting a towel on our shoulder and embroider the end-pieces of our towels but we have not forgotten our childhood friendship.” – Synopsis by Boro Baski for “Bagi kedalang (We no longer do the same)”, a song composed and performed by staff and students of the Rolf Schoembs Vidyashram (Non-formal Santal school, Ghosaldanga village, Dist.-Birbhum, West Bengal), included in the Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village)
https://youtu.be/PI7-7o5hBkE
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=25317

“Hidden within the colour, weave and design of tribal textiles are many legends. […] Each pattern is a little capsule of information—containing tales of ancestors, social values, clan practices, and more. […] It has also been observed that the one thing common to most weaves and motifs is the role of women as creators.” – Avantika Bhuyan (interviewing members the North East Network) in “Folklore, myths and handloom” (Livemint, 1 December 2017)
https://www.livemint.com/Leisure/FR23TDZqwz1hDYOlB5mRSN/Folklore-myths-and-handloom.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691 

“The western region consists of the desert states of Gujarat and Rajasthan as well as Haryana, western Uttar Pradesh and western Madhya Pradesh. […] The region is home to a wide variety of people with different religious ‘s and cultures, most of whom have distinctive traditional textiles. They include Jains, Parsis, Hindus and Muslims, as well as tribal groups such as the Bhils and Mina. Yet the dominant characteristic of the traditional saris and odhnis of all these communities, as with all western Indian fabrics, is colour. […] This region’s propensity toward colour has deep roots, for it is here that the Indus Valley civilization developed cotton-growing and -dyeing technologies.” – Linda Lynton in The Sari: Styles, Patterns, History, Techniques (London 1995)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11257

Learn more about tribal communities in Rajasthan

THE BHILS OF RAJASTHANIn Rajasthan, certain cities are named after the Bhil Kings who once ruled the region. Kota, for instance got its name from Kotya Bhil; Bansara is derived from Bansiya Bhil; and Dungarpur is named after Dungariya Bhil. … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Eco tourism, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Homes and utensils, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Resources, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Tips, Tourism, Video resources - external, Western region, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Learn more about tribal communities in Rajasthan

Video | Dongria Kondh heritage: “Villagers and tribesmen in India’s one of the rich mineral belts” – Odisha

The Dongria live in villages scattered throughout the hills. They believe that their right to cultivate Niyamgiri’s slopes has been conferred on them by Niyam Raja, and that they are his royal descendants. They have expert knowledge of their forests … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Health and nutrition, Maps, Modernity, Names and communities, Organizations, Press snippets, Resources, Tribal culture worldwide, Video resources - external, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | Dongria Kondh heritage: “Villagers and tribesmen in India’s one of the rich mineral belts” – Odisha

Toda embroidery: an ancient art thriving in the Nilgiris – Tamil Nadu

The ancient Toda community people are the residents of Nilgiris that means ‘Blue Mountains’, popularly known as Ooty. Nilgiris is the abode of many interesting tribes and prominent among them are Todas, Kotas, Kurumbas, Irulas, Mullukurumbas and Paniyans. These Todas … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Endangered language, Games and leisure time, Health and nutrition, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Southern region, Success story, Tourism, Tribal elders, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Toda embroidery: an ancient art thriving in the Nilgiris – Tamil Nadu

The Asurs’ remembrance of their ancestors: A ‘particularly vulnerable’ tribal group –  Bihar, Jharkhand & West Bengal

Prashant Pandey & Premankur Biswas, Indian Express, December 8, 2016 | To view more photos and read the full article, click here >> Chamru is an Asur, a ‘particularly vulnerable tribal group’ that dominates Sakhuapani’s population of about 2,000 and lives in villages … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Cultural heritage, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Dress and ornaments, Eastern region, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, History, Maps, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Northern region, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Performing arts, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on The Asurs’ remembrance of their ancestors: A ‘particularly vulnerable’ tribal group –  Bihar, Jharkhand & West Bengal

“Lessons that can teach us about humanity itself”: Collective and dignified survival celebrated at the Dongria Kondhs’ seed festival – Odisha

There will always be a seed for everyone | To read the full article and view more photos, click here >> In the early summer month of April, around the magnificent Niyamgiri range in southern Odisha, the desi mango trees are already … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Eastern region, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Hyderabad biodiversity pledge, Maps, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Success story, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on “Lessons that can teach us about humanity itself”: Collective and dignified survival celebrated at the Dongria Kondhs’ seed festival – Odisha