Category Archives: Rural poverty

“[I]ncome security of tribal peoples has been adversely affected by losses and access to productive resources (rights to forest or agricultural lands coupled with poor compensation). Debts are one of the main coping strategies, resulting in a hand-to-mouth existence for those affected.” – Tribal nutrition: UNICEF’s efforts to support the tribal population, especially children who suffer from malnourishment
https://www.unicef.org/india/what-we-do/tribal-nutrition
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11674

“By urban standards, the Bhils were poor but not impoverished [until the 1980s]. Very few Bhils worked outside their villages, and most of them seemed to be content with how they were. They grew whatever they required, and their methods of cultivation were simple: they scattered the seeds on the slopes of the hills and let them grow naturally. The forests around were rich in fruits, vegetables and herbs, which were collected. […] They had no faith in the promises of the government of being suitably rehabilitated [in the wake of submersion of their villages caused by the “Sardar Sarovar” dams along the Narmada river].” – Yoginder Sikand in “Simple ways of life” (Deccan Herald, 23 December 2012)
https://www.deccanherald.com/content/300193/simple-ways-life.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=10420

“315,000 farmers took their own lives between 1995 and 2018, as the numbers (huge underestimates) of the National Crime Records Bureau show. Millions either became agricultural labourers or migrated out of their villages – since many allied occupations had also died – in search of jobs.” – P. Sainath (founder of PARI “People’s Archive of Rural India”) in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/

“Everyone wants to learn but the problem is atmosphere, the medium of teaching and the method of teaching, besides the facts of economics. It is the reason why tribal children find it difficult to integrate with the mainstream. Another factor is the cost of schooling. According to a 2015 report by the Indian Ministry of Human Resource Development, the annual secondary school drop-out rate among Indigenous children in India is just above 40 percent compared with the national average of about 25 percent. The ministry lists “economic” issues as the biggest reason for the dropouts – families just cannot afford to keep their children in school.” – Santal educationist Boro Baski in “The Indian school where Indigenous children are ‘never outsiders” by Rosemary Marandi (Al Jazeera Education, 10 February 2020)
https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/indian-school-indigenous-children-outsiders-200128131128144.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=34790

“Is it eccentric to live in beautiful scenery in the hills among some of the most charming people in the country, even though they may be ignorant and poor?” – Verrier Elwin quoted by Ganesh Devy
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=15861

“Instead of creating a strategy based on reacting or responding to the symptoms of poverty, we want to create a new possibility in which poverty would have no space to exist.” – Kalyan Akkipeddi (“A Search for Resilience”)
https://ted.com/tedx
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=26213

“Poor implementation of existing schemes in the tribal regions has meant that not only poverty continues at an exceptionally high levels in these regions, but the decline in poverty has been much slower here than in the entire country, as shown in this table (for the years 1993-94, 1999-2000 and 2004-05)” – “Rural Population Living Below Poverty Line (In Percent), Planning Commission, Twelfth Five Year Plan Document” by Ashok A. Sonkusare, Joint Adviser (S&T), NITI Aayog/Planning Commission
https://data.gov.in/resources/rural-population-living-below-poverty-line-percent
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23847

“Although there has been a decline, the level of poverty in the tribal population is still much higher than the national average and the gap between the two continues to be one of the major issues of concern in poverty discourse in India.” – Virginius Xaxa (Delhi School of Economics) in “The Status of Tribal Children in India: A historical perspective” (Opportunities, Working Paper No. 7, 2011), Institute for Human Development India & United Nations Children’s Fund, India
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=10430

“Nehru was fascinated by the spontaneity of tribal culture and their capacity of joy and heroism in spite of their appalling poverty, destitution, and ignorance.” – Tribal Philosophy and Pandit Nehru by Chittaranjan Mishra in: Odisha Review (November 2017)
https://magazines.odisha.gov.in/Orissareview/2017/November/engpdf/100-110.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16310

Constructive action is our only future – Prof. Ganesh Devy on the “adivasiness of the tribals” in Gujarat

WHEN Gujarat was burning between 27 February and 4 March [2002], the tribal belt on the eastern border of Gujarat was quiet. The only exception was the two districts of Panchmahals for which Godhra is the main town. Elsewhere in … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Education and literacy, History, Misconceptions, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty | Comments Off on Constructive action is our only future – Prof. Ganesh Devy on the “adivasiness of the tribals” in Gujarat

“Woodsmoke and Leafcups”: A book that opens up the full joy of tribal life without romanticisation – Bastar

Woodsmoke and Leafcups; Madhu Ramnath, Harper Litmus, Rs.399. Felix Padel, The Hindu, March 12, 2016 | To read the full article, click here >> The full joy of tribal life opens up in these pages. As do the painful struggles under the exploitative … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Bastar, Central region, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Gandhian social movement, Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Storytelling, Tips, Tribal elders | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on “Woodsmoke and Leafcups”: A book that opens up the full joy of tribal life without romanticisation – Bastar

“Protect women’s rights at India’s tourist destinations”: Equations on the environmental, social and cultural impacts of tourism

[…] Please find attached EQUATIONS submission on concerns we have in relation to tourism’s role in the exploitation of women. Key concerns we would like to raise are summarised below: In our quest for tourism that is more equitable, sustainable and just we … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Childhood and children, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Women | Comments Off on “Protect women’s rights at India’s tourist destinations”: Equations on the environmental, social and cultural impacts of tourism

Audio | World renowned Indian journalist Palagummi Sainath: “The greatest stories are now coming from non-journalists”

To listen to this programme online, click here >> World renowned Indian Journalist Palagummi Sainath says the greatest stories of journalism are now coming from non-journalists “You will never find a great establishment journalist. My argument to you, is that … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Audio resources - external, Commentary, Community facilities, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Gandhian social movement, Globalization, Modernity, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty, Storytelling | Comments Off on Audio | World renowned Indian journalist Palagummi Sainath: “The greatest stories are now coming from non-journalists”

Video, audio, photo content & stories | “Cover Your Country” by PARI: Rural people speak about their lives

Nayak, 75 years old, is from the Lambadi community, and his animals – like those of many cattle breeders here – are Thurupu cattle. The Lambadi (a Scheduled Tribe), the Yadava (Golla) (an OBC) and Chenchu (a Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Group) … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Audio resources - external, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Film, Health and nutrition, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Regions of India, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Storytelling, Success story, Tips, Video resources - external | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Video, audio, photo content & stories | “Cover Your Country” by PARI: Rural people speak about their lives