Category Archives: Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes

“The widely prevailing belief which tends to associate all Adivasis with a nomadic life isn’t rooted in objective reality; more often than not it comes from the easy—fictitious—route of distance and dominance. […] It is not very difficult to identify the issues related to accessing the educational opportunities by the Adivasi children in general, and children within certain groups in particular. They include difficulties of physical access, the problem of language and culture, and the contrast between the apparent backwardness of these communities as imagined by the authorities and a very different objective reality that upholds a plethora of cultural strengths that can be fruitfully utilised while planning educational initiatives. Utilisation of resources available in the form of educated Adivasi youths would be just one of several to achieve this end. Similarly, the terrible neglect in public delivery of healthcare must not be allowed to continue.” – Brochure for the report titled “Living World of the Adivasis of West Bengal: An Ethnographic Exploration”, issued on the occasion of the Kolkata International Book Fair 2020
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=31882

Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

Read the full article by Prof. Andrew B. Smith >> The name ‘Hottentot’, or its Afrikaans shortening ‘Hotnot’, became a disparaging term for people of colour at the Cape. Today we refer to the aboriginal herders of the Cape by the … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Archaeology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Gandhian social movement, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Quotes, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

The crisis within by G.N. Devy (Book review): “Nearly one in every twelve humans is a young Indian for whom meaningful education is of critical importance”

The crisis within by G.N. DevyISBN: 978-93-83064-10-6Genre: Non-Fiction/ EconomicsPublishers: Aleph PublishersPrice: Rs. 399/- Nearly one in every twelve humans is a young Indian for whom meaningful education is of critical importance. […] If knowledge is the core of education and … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Quotes, Storytelling, Tips | Comments Off on The crisis within by G.N. Devy (Book review): “Nearly one in every twelve humans is a young Indian for whom meaningful education is of critical importance”

Chenchu music: “Kinnera” stringed music instrument – Telangana

It was quite a homecoming for ‘Kinnera’ (aka ‘Kinneri’), a stringed music instrument, when it arrived into the Chenchu tribal heartland amid the forests of Mahabubnagar district of Telangana, after decades of wandering. | To read the full article, click here … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Commentary, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Homes and utensils, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Southern region, Tribal elders, Video resources - external | Tagged , | Comments Off on Chenchu music: “Kinnera” stringed music instrument – Telangana

The nomadic Romany (“gypsy”) tribe: Credited with amazing contributions to the music and dance of many countries from antiquity to the present – Sind & Punjab

The Times of India, Life, May 14, 2013 | To read the full article, click here >> Many of the modern day gypsies can be traced back to the nomadic tribe called Roma. In Europe, they were referred to as the goddess-worshippers. … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Music and dance, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Performing arts, Press snippets, Storytelling, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on The nomadic Romany (“gypsy”) tribe: Credited with amazing contributions to the music and dance of many countries from antiquity to the present – Sind & Punjab

Serving endangered languages, denotified and nomadic Communities: Ganesh Devy on the need for a “sustainable economic and social base in the homeland”

A Nomad Called Thief: Reflections on Adivasi Silence and Voice by GN Devy A collection of essays on Adivasis. Tribal groups (adivasis) in India have often been excluded, marginalized and oppressed by ‘mainstream’ society. In many ways this exclusion, marginalization and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Customs, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Museum collections - India, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Trees | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Serving endangered languages, denotified and nomadic Communities: Ganesh Devy on the need for a “sustainable economic and social base in the homeland”