Category Archives: Tribal elders

“We plant the trees for our children in the memory of our elders who planted for us.” – Fundia Bai Parte of Korku village in Betul (Madhya Pradesh), interviewed in “Protectors dubbed criminals” by Aparna Pallavi (Down To Earth, 7 June 2015)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/coverage/protectors-dubbed-criminals-38993
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20447

“The Adivasi Munnetra Sangam, Gudalur, spearheaded a movement that prevents Adivasi children from dropping out of school, by involving local tribal communities in the process. [It] appointed village elders in all tribal hamlets and have given them the responsibility to take [2,800 tribal] children to school, wait till classes get over, and then return.” – Former Founder-Trustee of the Viswa Bharathi Vidyodaya Trust, Bhaskaran Ramdas interviewed in “Grassroots movement to keep kids in school” by Rohan Premkumar The New Indian Express, 11 August 2016)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20832

“We were there, we are here and we will be there (Hum the, hum hain aur hum rahenge).” – Vandna Tete (General secretary, Jharkhandi Bhasha Sahitya Sanskriti Akhra) during the first-ever all-India tribal women writers’ meet, quoted in “City platform for tribal women writers” (The Telegraph, 8 September 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22856

“Literature on adivasis, shaped by perspectives of authors who may or may not have interacted or studied the tribals and their lives, could be romantic flights of the imagination or grim portraits about trials and tribulations of the tribals. Irked by these fanciful and wrong representations of his community, Narayan, a member of the Malaarayar tribal community in Kerala, took up the pen to write the first authentic novel written by an adivasi in South India [who] reminds us, yet again, how these children of the land were marginalised by the state, the establishment and organised religion. From proud farmers, practitioners of traditional medicine and guardians of the land, the tribals became displaced and dispossessed, dependent on the largesse of the State to protect their lands and, most importantly, their cultural identity.” – Saraswathy Nagarajan in “Found in translation” reviewing Kocharethi by Narayan, “a novel based on experiences told by the author’s elders” (The Hindu, 27 April 2011)
https://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/article1772998.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1459

“By addressing the needs of users of indigenous languages and offering an adequate response to the challenges indigenous people face in maintaining and transmitting their languages from one generation to another, the global community acknowledges the wider and special significance of all indigenous languages and their role in and relevance to peacebuilding, good governance, sustainable development and reconciliation within our societies.” – “Summary report on the International Year of Indigenous Languages, 2019” (United Nations, 14 February 2020)
https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N20/040/59/PDF/N2004059.pdf?OpenElement
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=46777

“The national media focuses on the negative. We are providing positive stories- stories about who has survived and how we are all pitching in to help each other and take care of our elders.”- From the Editors in “On the front lines: Journalism may never be so needed – or so endangered” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org

Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Director: Sunanda Bhat | Producer: Songline FilmsGenre: Documentary | Produced In: 2012 | Story Teller’s Country: India Synopsis: The film interweaves contemporary narratives with an ancient tribal creation myth to explore the effects of a rapidly changing landscape on lives and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Film, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tourism, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Video | Vayali Folklore Group performance – Kerala

The performance video covers Vayali Folklore Group’s journey for a folk art dance performance. The colour, energy and skill of the young people is on full display. About Vayali Motto: “Culture nourishes itself from nature.Without nature, culture cannot exist;without culture, … Continue reading

Posted in Crafts and visual arts, Eco tourism, Education and literacy, Music and dance, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Vayali Folklore Group performance – Kerala

Tip | “A need deeply felt by Adivasis”: Respect for native languages and knowledge systems linked to the land and forest

In Rayagada in Odisha, Kondh parents distinguish between dangar patha (mountain learning) and kagaj patha (paper learning). Asked which they prefer, many parents answer ‘both’. This expresses a need deeply felt by Adivasis: literacy, with fluency in the regional language … Continue reading

Posted in Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Endangered language, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Tips, Trees, Tribal elders | Comments Off on Tip | “A need deeply felt by Adivasis”: Respect for native languages and knowledge systems linked to the land and forest

“Kocharethi calls upon us to ethically engage with it, to question our complicity” – First novel by an Adivasi in Kerala

To read the full book review, click here >> Narayan, Kerala’s first tribal novelist, avoids romanticising his milieu. Kocharethi is about the hidden poetry of marginal lives… The temptation to exoticise cultures that have not been commodified yet must be … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Childhood, Colonial policies, Customs, Education and literacy, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTG), Press snippets, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on “Kocharethi calls upon us to ethically engage with it, to question our complicity” – First novel by an Adivasi in Kerala

Shivaratri celebrations by the Kota community in the Nilgiri mountains – Tamil Nadu

View a video and two slideshows taken during Shivaratri, the main annual festival celebtrated by the Kota community Video | Kota women’s dance Video | Kota dance Slideshow | Kota dance and music Slideshow | Kota game More videos, slideshows and background information provided … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Childhood, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Games and leisure time, Literature and bibliographies, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nilgiri Biosphere, Photos and slideshows, Seasons and festivals, Tribal elders, Video contents, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Shivaratri celebrations by the Kota community in the Nilgiri mountains – Tamil Nadu