Tag Archives: Santal

Marriage customs of the Santals: A large mural created by village artists to express their cultural identity – West Bengal

Marriage Reception A Santal marriage takes five days and involves various, often complex, rituals. On the day of the Gidi-chumara (Marriage Reception) the women arrive to bless the bride and groom with grass and grains of rice which are kept … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Education and literacy, Literature and bibliographies, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Tagore and rural culture, Tourism, Trees, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Marriage customs of the Santals: A large mural created by village artists to express their cultural identity – West Bengal

Traditional music instruments of the Santals at the Museum of Santal Culture – West Bengal

Tirio bamboo flute * Dhodro banam bowed instrument * Madol or tumdak double-sided barrel drum * Photos: Boro Baski, Museum of Santal Culture; photo credit: Ludwig Pesch © 2012 Information on these and other music instruments provided by the Wesanthals E-Group * … Continue reading

Posted in Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Resources, Santali language and literature, Websites by tribal communities | Tagged | Comments Off on Traditional music instruments of the Santals at the Museum of Santal Culture – West Bengal

eJournal | Impact of public presentations of Adivasi (Santal) music – West Bengal

Adivasi music and the public stageBy Jayasri Banerjee These days, no festival or utsav is considered complete without some sort of folk music or dance. The idea of presenting the music and dance traditions of the Adivasis in a public forum is generally … Continue reading

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Video | “Rasi Nato” (Big Village): Song 5 from Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village) – West Bengal

5 Rasi Nato (Big Village) [Starting from 16:25, continues/ends in Part 2] ThemeA group of women recall their bygone days:In our big village we girls and boys were together in pairs. But the pairs of our friendships are no more. … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood and children, Commentary, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, eBook & eJournal, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Resources, Santali language and literature, Storytelling, Video contents, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | “Rasi Nato” (Big Village): Song 5 from Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village) – West Bengal

In search of a development that preserves the best parts of Adivasi culture and collectivity: Imagining an alternative “Discovery Of India”

Call us adivasis, please If Adivasis were to start writing their own Discovery Of India, it would be something like this: There are those who talk of India’s “5000 year-old culture,” there are those who talk of its “timeless traditions.” … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Customs, Democracy, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, History, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Northern region – Northern Zonal Council, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Success story, Western region –  Western Zonal Council | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on In search of a development that preserves the best parts of Adivasi culture and collectivity: Imagining an alternative “Discovery Of India”