Category Archives: Literature and bibliographies

“By the 1940s in India, when considering how to incorporate tribal populations into the nation state, there was a division between two camps—one promoted ‘isolation’ and ‘protection’ against assimilation, while the other was for ‘intervention’ and ‘assimilation.’ Verrier Elwin and Ghurye broadly represent these opposite poles. Elwin, at least initially, supported protectionist policies and recommended the ‘partial isolation’ of tribes from non-tribal society.” – Richard Kamei in “Uncivilising the Mind: How anthropology shaped the discourse on tribes in India” (Caravan Magazine, 1 March 2021)
https://caravanmagazine.in/books/anthropologists-tribes-india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6911

“Western epistemology has considered oral societies as being devoid of histories, while they do appropriate these histories in different ways. The binaries on which these studies are premised are unfair – such as those of oral/written, civilized/uncivilized, subjective/ objective. They consider documentation as authentic and deride the authenticity of oral cultures. They are unmindful of the fact that the documentation is also not free from subjective ideological interventions. […] Therefore, it is necessary for tribal studies to counter the epistemologies from outside and develop an epistemology with a perspective from within.” – Bipin Jojo in “Report for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative”
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23050

“In West Bengal, most Santal children attend state schools where Bengali is the language of instruction. In the neighbouring states, other languages are prevalent. At the same time, Latin letters are still in use as well, not least because some of the books prepared early on by the missionaries are still in print. They are indeed very useful.” – Boro Baski in “The pros and cons of Ol-chiki” (D+C Development and Cooperation, e-Paper April 2021)
https://www.dandc.eu/sites/default/files/pdf_files/dc_2021-04.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21581

“In the highlands of the former Hyderabad State (now Andhra Pradesh) concentrations of Gonds persisted in their traditional lifestyle until the middle of the twentieth century: feudal chiefs continued to function as tribal heads and hereditary bards preserved a wealth of myths and epic tales.[…] In 1979 the Gonds were once again being subjected to the pressure of outside forces and Professor von Fürer-Haimendorf lays special emphasis on the analysis of the process of social change forced upon the Gonds by settlers from outside.” – Publisher’s description of The Gonds of Andhra Pradesh Tradition and Change in an Indian Tribe” by Christoph and Elisabeth von Fürer-Haimendorf (Routledge, December 2021)
https://www.routledge.com/The-Gonds-of-Andhra-Pradesh-Tradition-and-Change-in-an-Indian-Tribe/Furer-Haimendorf-Furer-Haimendorf/p/book/9781032156484
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11872

“Several indigenous authors—Easterine Kire, Jacinta Kerketta, Dolly Kikon, Hansda Sowvendra Shekhar, Temsüla Ao, Joy Pachuau, Senganglu Thaimei, Gladson Dungdung, Veio Pou, Kham Khan Suan Hausing, Ngamjahao Kipgen, Hoineilhing Sitlhou and many more—are writing stories foregrounding their perspectives, concepts, and theories about tribes. This is a step towards undoing tribes’ invisibility in literature. Yet, discrimination against tribes continues.” – Richard Kamei in “Uncivilising the Mind: How anthropology shaped the discourse on tribes in India” (Caravan Magazine, 1 March 2021)
https://caravanmagazine.in/books/anthropologists-tribes-india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16601

“The whole body of writings on the tribes has been marked by i) Orientalist stereotyping ii) nationalism, because of which they were largely misrepresentations.” – Joseph Bara, on the need to critique the existing narratives and knowledge systems about the tribals in India in “Report for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative”
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23050

The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

By J.J. Roy Burman, Mainstream, Vol XLVII, No 32, July 25, 2009 In India the term ‘Adivasi’ has gained immense popularity in the last few decades to identify the tribes. This term is more commonly brought to use by the NGO … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council | Comments Off on The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

Tip | How to quickly find video and other contents for educational purposes

To understand India’s tribal or “Adivasi” culture, explore how it is being portrayed in a modern context. Here you find some suggestions to help you to quickly find video contents for educational purposes.  Use the “Search this website” or “Search” … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Bastar, Film, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Modernity, Resources, Tips, Tribal identity, Video contents, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Tip | How to quickly find video and other contents for educational purposes

International Mother Language Day (annually observed on 21 February): “Language teaching and particularly multilingual education are a key factor in the development of understanding among peoples and dialogue for peace” – Unesco

How to celebrate Mother Language Day in your school | Read the full post by Unesco for updates >> Schoolteachers Encourage children to use their mother languages to introduce themselves and talk about their families and culture Celebrate culture by having them read … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood and children, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Globalization, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Multi-lingual education, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tips, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on International Mother Language Day (annually observed on 21 February): “Language teaching and particularly multilingual education are a key factor in the development of understanding among peoples and dialogue for peace” – Unesco

Santali and related tribal languages of the Chotanagpur region: Mundari, Ho and Birjiya – Jharkhand

Birjiya [Birjia] is the language spoken by Asur tribe/ethnic group, just as Kurukh is spoken by Oraon group, Santali by Santal group, Mundari by Munda group, Ho by Ho group and Kharia by Kharia group.  These are broadly identified by … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Chotanagpur, Colonial policies, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Economy and development, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Names and communities, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Quotes, Social conventions | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Santali and related tribal languages of the Chotanagpur region: Mundari, Ho and Birjiya – Jharkhand

eJournal | The framework for the governance of ‘Scheduled Areas introduced in 1935: Those regions inhabited predominantly by Adivasis (India’s Indigenous and ‘tribal’ peoples)

The Government of India Act was formalized in 1935 as a means of transferring administrative power from the British Raj to the Indian National Congress. It introduced a new framework for the governance of ‘Scheduled Areas,’ i.e. those regions inhabited … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, Colonial policies, eBook eJournal PDF, History, Literature and bibliographies, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Tribal identity | Comments Off on eJournal | The framework for the governance of ‘Scheduled Areas introduced in 1935: Those regions inhabited predominantly by Adivasis (India’s Indigenous and ‘tribal’ peoples)