Category Archives: Biodiversity

“[D]eforestation and landscape change [have lead to] unavailability of gum karaya Sterculia urens, kunkudukaaya Sapindus emarginatus, and honey as the larger gum and nut yielding and beehive preferred trees like Adina cordifolia and Dalbergia sissoo have been cut down.” – Vikram Aditya in “Displaced from the hills: Livelihoods of tribal communities in Eastern Ghats under threat” (Down to Earth, 24 February 2021)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/forests/displaced-from-the-hills-livelihoods-of-tribal-communities-in-eastern-ghats-under-threat-75657
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5629

“Cultivating and conserving diversity is no luxury in our times: it is a survival imperative.” – Physicist Vandana Shiva (co-founder of Navdanya and the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy (RFSTN)
https://www.rightlivelihoodaward.org/laureates/vandana-shiva/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6068

“Biodiversity is under threat from a range of sources […] The question now is whether India is going to honestly identify what this underlying driver is and make a serious effort to balance the development versus nature battle.” – Tarsh Thekaekara (thesholatrust.org) in “Red marks in India’s green report card” (The Hindu, 17 October 2012)
https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/Red-marks-in-India’s-green-report-card/article12560107.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7891

“In general, the sustainability, productivity, resilience and stability of socio-ecological ecosystems usually found in indigenous and rural communities are dependent on the cultural values exhibited by its indigenous peoples. […] The [formerly semi-nomadic hill tribe known as the ‘Kaani’] are an ethnic group with their own unique social institutions and organizations with self-rule, who prioritised harmonious relationships with their ecology through cultural and religious observations and beliefs.” – Danesto B. Anacio & Davidson Sargunam in a UNESCO report, “Knowing our Lands and Resources: Indigenous and Local Knowledge and Practices related to Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Asia” (Knowledges of Nature 10.: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Paris 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24265

“It is no coincidence that where healthy Fourth World [Indigenous] nations live and prosper based on their freely chosen political, cultural, economic and social way of life the living Earth also thrives. Thus, it is no surprise that Fourth World nations occupy 80% of the world’s remaining biodiverse rainforests, plains, tundra, mountain regions, estuaries, rivers and streams, and deserts.” – Rudolph C. Rÿser (Founder, Center for World Indigenous Studies) in Biodiversity Wars: Coexistence or Biocultural Collapse in the 21st Century (2020), Chapter 1 “Original Peoples”
https://www.cwis.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Chapter-1_Biodiversity-Wars.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=37546

“In Search of Biohappiness deals with methods of converting agro-biodiversity hotspots into happy spots. This involves concurrent attention to conservation, and sustainable and equitable use. […] Concrete examples of how local tribal families have taken to the establishment of gene, seed, grain and water banks in villages – thus linking conservation, cultivation, consumption and commerce in a mutually-reinforcing manner – are provided in this book.” – Summary for In search of biohappiness: biodiversity and food, health and livelihood security by M.S. Swaminathan (World Scientific, 2015)
http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/910845554
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

There’s much to learn from the positive contributions made by tribal communities on a daily basis. To start with, let’s learn from insiders and others who have dedicated their lives to ensuring that a precious heritage will continue to make … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, FAQ, Gandhian social movement, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

Ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival

Environmentalism of the poor For many disadvantaged communities in developing countries, ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival. In India, protests and social movements are expressing these worries. By Sunita Narain All over India … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Commentary, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Globalization, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty | Comments Off on Ecological issues are not a matter of luxury, but a matter of survival

Ensuring sustainable livelihoods, equity and well-being – Forest Peoples Programme

Around 300 million people, made up of local communities and indigenous peoples, traditionally live in forests and primarily depend on them for their livelihoods Customary lands of indigenous peoples and local communities encompass 65% of the world’s land area, and … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Community facilities, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on Ensuring sustainable livelihoods, equity and well-being – Forest Peoples Programme

The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

Golden Orb Web Spider, Nephila maculata, Giant Wood Spider World distribution: Tropical areas from Africa, India, China, Japan across Southeast Asia to Northern Australia and the South Pacific islands. Webs of steel: The Golden Orb Web Spider is not the … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Biodiversity, Commentary, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, History, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

Video | Health and the nutritional value of indigenous grains, seeds and millets: “The tribal food basket has always been ­diverse and nutritious”

Excerpt from “Rage Of A Silent, Invisible Killer Called Malnutrition – Why Shining India Is In Grip Of An Epic Calamity” by Damayanti Datta | Read the full article >>Despite designing the world’s earliest and largest schemes on hunger and … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Commentary, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Health and nutrition, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Tips, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Video | Health and the nutritional value of indigenous grains, seeds and millets: “The tribal food basket has always been ­diverse and nutritious”