Category Archives: Biodiversity

“While collecting tubers, we take only what we need and we will cover the rest with mud again. Usually the main root is not taken because we need it for next year.”– Wildlife conservationist Ramesh in “Bomman thatha and his forest”, a conversation with his grandfather on “bonding between adivasi people and the forest” (At the Edge of Existence, 29 October 2014)
https://cultureandconservation.wordpress.com/2014/10/29/bomman-thatha-and-his-forest/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=8262

What is the Biodiversity Act? “An Act [law] to provide for conservation of biological diversity, sustainable use of its components and fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the use of biological resources, knowledge and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.” – The National Biodiversity Authority in “The Biological Diversity Act, 2002 and Biological Diversity Rules, 2004” (promulgated by the Government of India, 5 February 2003)
http://nbaindia.org/uploaded/act/BDACT_ENG.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

“The community, when consenting to the access [i.e. knowledge of tribal healers], can charge fees for access to the register and collection of biological resources. Decisions on how to disburse the funds are to be made through village community meetings. There is concern about the Biodiversity Registers in case the process has the effect of placing knowledge hitherto regarded as secret by communities in the public domain, and that once this is done it would open the way for corporate and research interests to freely access and use the local knowledge about the biodiversity resources.” – Kerala Forest Department in “Medicinal Plants”, 8 January 2010
URL: http://old.forest.kerala.gov.in
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=18372

“Biodiversity is under threat from a range of sources […] The question now is whether India is going to honestly identify what this underlying driver is and make a serious effort to balance the development versus nature battle.” – Tarsh Thekaekara (Director, Shola Trust) in “Red marks in India’s green report card” (The Hindu, 17 October 2012)
https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/Red-marks-in-India’s-green-report-card/article12560107.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7891

“Into the 90s, the Andamans, one of the most biodiverse parts of India – with rich, ancient rainforests – saw lots of logging. In the guise of extending ‘development’ to the tribes, the infamous Andaman Trunk Road was built as well, cutting through the forests where the Jarawas lived.” – M. Rajshekhar in “Remembering Samir Acharya, Who Fought to Preserve the Cultures of Andaman and Nicobar” (The Wire, 18 October 2020)
https://thewire.in/rights/samir-acharya-andaman-nicobar-activist-culture-preservation-tribute
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7364

“[D]eforestation and landscape change [have led to] unavailability of gum karaya Sterculia urens, kunkudukaaya Sapindus emarginatus, and honey as the larger gum and nut yielding and beehive preferred trees like Adina cordifolia and Dalbergia sissoo have been cut down.” – Vikram Aditya in “Displaced from the hills: Livelihoods of tribal communities in Eastern Ghats under threat” (Down to Earth, 24 February 2021)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/forests/displaced-from-the-hills-livelihoods-of-tribal-communities-in-eastern-ghats-under-threat-75657
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5629

“It is no coincidence that where healthy Fourth World [Indigenous] nations live and prosper based on their freely chosen political, cultural, economic and social way of life the living Earth also thrives. Thus, it is no surprise that Fourth World nations occupy 80% of the world’s remaining biodiverse rainforests, plains, tundra, mountain regions, estuaries, rivers and streams, and deserts.” – Rudolph C. Rÿser (Founder, Center for World Indigenous Studies) in Biodiversity Wars: Coexistence or Biocultural Collapse in the 21st Century (2020), Chapter 1 “Original Peoples”
https://www.cwis.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Chapter-1_Biodiversity-Wars.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=37546

“Cultivating and conserving diversity is no luxury in our times: it is a survival imperative.” – Physicist Vandana Shiva (co-founder of Navdanya and the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy (RFSTN)
https://www.rightlivelihoodaward.org/laureates/vandana-shiva/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=6068

“Indigenous economics is one of the keys to climate action.” – Equator Initiative of the United Nations which recognizes outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity Global Programe on Nature for Development
https://www.equatorinitiative.org/equator-prize/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=46483

“The National Biodiversity Authority (NBA) is set to tell the National Green Tribunal that it created 243,499 biodiversity management committees (BMC) and 95,525 people’s biodiversity registers (PBR) as of January 2020, a source said. The green bench is hearing a case on the full implementation of the Biodiversity Act, 2002. BMCs are created for “promoting conservation, sustainable use and documentation of biological diversity” by local bodies across the country, according to the NBA.” – Ishan Kukreti in “Most biodiversity panels now in place, National Biodiversity Authority to tell NGT” (Down to Earth, 18 February 2020)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/india/most-biodiversity-panels-now-in-place-national-biodiversity-authority-to-tell-ngt-69334
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

“Sharing stories that make use of overlaps with indigenous beliefs may, therefore, be a valuable approach in conservation education and wider conservation communication. Sacred natural sites occur in protected areas throughout the world and are not confined to one faith, culture or levels of economic development.” – Nazir A. Pala, Ajeet K. Neg and N.P. Todaria in “The Religious, Social and Cultural Significance of Forest Landscapes in Uttarakhand Himalaya, India” (International Journal of Conservation Science, Vol. 5, Issue 2, April-June 2014)
https://www.academia.edu/32265911
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24271

“Our task is to retain urban biodiversity and augment it.” – Rashneh Pardiwala in “Why It’s Hard to ‘Change Mindsets’ on Environmental Protection Among India’s Elites”; interview on environmental education at her Centre for Environmental Research and Education (CERE) in Mumbai (Asia Blog, 27 July 2015)
https://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/interview-why-its-hard-change-mindsets-environmental-protection-among-indias-elites
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

“We need that biodiversity to survive.” – Julia Watson, architect and assistant professor at Columbia University, whose work revolves around nature-based technologies of indigenous knowledge in “The ingenious living bridges of India” by Zinara Rathnayake (BBC, 18th November 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20211117-how-indias-living-bridges-could-transform-architecture
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=18841

“Today, some scientists estimate that we are living in a ’10 percent world’ — a world reduced to just 10 percent of its past abundance of nonhuman life. And a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences estimates that just four percent of the planet’s biomass is now made up of wild animals — Humans account for 36 percent and their livestock for an additional 60 percent.” – Alexandra Kleeman in “Bolder Reimagining” (55 Voices for Democracy: “Bolder Reimagining” by Alexandra Kleeman, 31 December 2021)
https://blog.lareviewofbooks.org/55-voices/55-voices-democracy-bolder-reimagining-alexandra-kleeman/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23900

“Living infrastructure can support incredible biodiversity and species, not just humans.” – Julia Watson, architect and assistant professor at Columbia University, whose work revolves around nature-based technologies of indigenous knowledge in “The ingenious living bridges of India” by Zinara Rathnayake (BBC, 18th November 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20211117-how-indias-living-bridges-could-transform-architecture
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=18841

“In general, the sustainability, productivity, resilience and stability of socio-ecological ecosystems usually found in indigenous and rural communities are dependent on the cultural values exhibited by its indigenous peoples. […] The [formerly semi-nomadic hill tribe known as the ‘Kaani’] are an ethnic group with their own unique social institutions and organizations with self-rule, who prioritised harmonious relationships with their ecology through cultural and religious observations and beliefs.” – Danesto B. Anacio & Davidson Sargunam in a UNESCO report, “Knowing our Lands and Resources: Indigenous and Local Knowledge and Practices related to Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Asia” (Knowledges of Nature 10.: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Paris 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24265

“In Search of Biohappiness deals with methods of converting agro-biodiversity hotspots into happy spots. This involves concurrent attention to conservation, and sustainable and equitable use. […] Concrete examples of how local tribal families have taken to the establishment of gene, seed, grain and water banks in villages – thus linking conservation, cultivation, consumption and commerce in a mutually-reinforcing manner – are provided in this book.” – Summary for In search of biohappiness: biodiversity and food, health and livelihood security by M.S. Swaminathan (World Scientific, 2015)
http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/910845554
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

Sharing valuable rice varieties with farmers: Biodiversity for the sake of “vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations” – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha Maharashtra & West Bengal

IN BRIEF India originally possessed some 110,000 landraces of rice with diverse and valuable properties. These include enrichment in vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations. The Green Revolution covered fields with a few … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Biodiversity, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ethnobotany and ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Resources, Success story, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Sharing valuable rice varieties with farmers: Biodiversity for the sake of “vital nutrients and the ability to withstand flood, drought, salinity or pest infestations” – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha Maharashtra & West Bengal

Audio | The Muskoka Summit on the Environment – Canada

Restoring our relationship with nature from lake beds to treetops Indigenous peoples have all around the world have principles and values that we can learn from, that will help us to understand what our responsibility is here. (9:33) What’s emerging … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Globalization, Health and nutrition, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story, Tips, Trees, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Women | Comments Off on Audio | The Muskoka Summit on the Environment – Canada

eBook | Solutions that preserve the diversity of cultures and ecosystems: “The only two factors that ensure life on the planet”

About the Author […] Dr. Rÿser has contributed to policies and laws affecting American Indians and indigenous peoples internationally, contributing for more than 25 years to the development of the UN declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the UN … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Democracy, eBook eJournal ePaper, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Trees, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Video resources - external | Comments Off on eBook | Solutions that preserve the diversity of cultures and ecosystems: “The only two factors that ensure life on the planet”

Environmental history and what makes for a civilization – Romila Thapar

“Many voices of history … are what well known historian Romila Thapar brings out in her works. In this exclusive interview, she talks about changing trends in research, corruption in society and why she refused the Padma Bhushan.” – Excerpts … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Bees and honey, Biodiversity, Customs, Ecology and environment, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets, Quotes, Trees, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Environmental history and what makes for a civilization – Romila Thapar

Preserving tribal culture and maintaining control over their own affairs: Adi ‘Hill Men’ – Arunachal Pradesh

With political changes afoot in Burma, policy wonks and businessmen are taking a new look at India’s Northeast for economic and geopolitical calculations, but there’s a more colourful reason that people should “Look East” to this fascinating region: its remarkable … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Biodiversity, Childhood, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Games and leisure time, Government of India, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Seasons and festivals, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Social conventions, Tiger, Tourism, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Preserving tribal culture and maintaining control over their own affairs: Adi ‘Hill Men’ – Arunachal Pradesh