Category Archives: Childhood and children

“It is not very difficult to identify the issues related to accessing the educational opportunities by the Adivasi children in general, and children within certain groups in particular. They include difficulties of physical access, the problem of language and culture, and the contrast between the apparent backwardness of these communities as imagined by the authorities and a very different objective reality that upholds a plethora of cultural strengths that can be fruitfully utilised while planning educational initiatives. Utilisation of resources available in the form of educated Adivasi youths would be just one of several to achieve this end.” – Brochure for the report titled “Living World of the Adivasis of West Bengal: An Ethnographic Exploration”, issued on the occasion of the Kolkata International Book Fair 2020
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=31882

“A boy tells a girl: Oh Muni, you may have forgotten the days when we played together under the banyan tree. Playfully we cooked dust as if it were rice and tree-leaves as if they were curry. How we used to catch fish together in the muddy water and pull out lotus-roots from the water to eat. Maybe you no longer remember? The girl tells the boy: Remembering our bygone days makes my heart burn, the smile of my child lightens my heart.” – Synopsis by Boro Baski for “Dhuri Daka (Rice made of Dust)”, a song composed and performed by staff and students of the Rolf Schoembs Vidyashram (Non-formal Santal school, Ghosaldanga village, Dist.-Birbhum, West Bengal), included in the Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village)
https://youtu.be/OU15PO8TFnA
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=25317

“The smart boy or clever girl who is deprived of the opportunity of schooling, or who goes to a school with dismal facilities (not to mention the high incidence of absentee teachers), not only loses the opportunities he or she could have had, but also adds to the massive waste of talent that is a characteristic of the life of our country.” – Nobel Awardee Amartya Sen in The Argumentative Indian (Penguin Books, 2005), p. 344
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Argumentative_Indian
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=25728

“[Tribal] children are preferred for particular works due to the benefit of vigorous toil for low wages. […] Income generation at a very young age reduces the scope for development of other individual resources.” – Ameya MR in “A Case Study of ‘Kanavu’ in the Evolutionary Perspective of Approaches to Education” (MA thesis, Mahatma Gandhi University 2015), p. 57
https://www.academia.edu/21289981
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1847

“Tribal children have higher levels of undernutrition compared to children of socially economically advanced sections.” – Programme report on Tribal nutrition: “UNICEF’s efforts to support the tribal population, especially children who suffer from malnourishment”
https://www.unicef.org/india/what-we-do/tribal-nutrition
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11674

“Women have profound traditional and contemporary knowledge about the natural world around them and hence there’s a necessity to make policies mindful of the connection between environment and gender. [T]hat’s why it’s largely in the hands of women to sensitise our children towards the ecological heritage. Big changes always begin with small steps and the right place is always the home.” – Writer-activist Mari Marcel Thekaekara (The Hindu, 27 January 2017)
https://www.indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22373

“[N]ew pedagogic practices require to be evolved in order to execute various developmental programmes. In doing so, good practices that exist in the society may turn out to be very handy. In case of tribal societies, for example, there are two striking aspects with regard to caring for the child and nurturing the young. One is the prevalence of breast feeding and the other is the tradition of kin/community care of the children. It is the kin care that explains as to why it is rare to find destitution and begging among tribal population, including tribal children. Equally important in this respect is the emphasis on ethics of work, which the children internalise quite early in life. Things have however begun to change because of displacement due to development projects and lack of rehabilitation and resettlement of displaced population.” – From “The Status of Tribal Children in India: A historical perspective, 2011” (Opportunities, Working Paper No. 7, Institute for Human Development, United Nations Children’s Fund, India)
http://www.ihdindia.org/pdf/virginius_xaxa.pdf

Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Director: Sunanda Bhat | Producer: Songline FilmsGenre: Documentary | Produced In: 2012 | Story Teller’s Country: India Synopsis: The film interweaves contemporary narratives with an ancient tribal creation myth to explore the effects of a rapidly changing landscape on lives and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood and children, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Film, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tourism, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

“We are so much more than that”: Book by S. Swarnalatha documenting the lives her own community, the Irula, who are known for their knowledge of nature and medicinal herbs – Tamil Nadu & Kerala

“My grandmother told me if someone ever pointed out our dance movements are peculiar, we should tell them these are the feline steps of a hunter” | To read the full story, click here >> Swarnalatha belongs to the tribal … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Childhood and children, Customs, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, Games and leisure time, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on “We are so much more than that”: Book by S. Swarnalatha documenting the lives her own community, the Irula, who are known for their knowledge of nature and medicinal herbs – Tamil Nadu & Kerala

International Mother Language Day (annually observed on 21 February): “Language teaching and particularly multilingual education are a key factor in the development of understanding among peoples and dialogue for peace” – Unesco

How to celebrate Mother Language Day in your school | Read the full post by Unesco for updates >> Schoolteachers Encourage children to use their mother languages to introduce themselves and talk about their families and culture Celebrate culture by having them read … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood and children, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Globalization, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Multi-lingual education, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tips, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on International Mother Language Day (annually observed on 21 February): “Language teaching and particularly multilingual education are a key factor in the development of understanding among peoples and dialogue for peace” – Unesco

“We plant the trees for our children in the memory of our elders who planted for us”: Trees are indispensable for India’s tribal communities

To enlarge, view other paintings and read the full article, click here >> My image shows the museum as a tree. It’s a strange tree. Things are a bit upside down and it’s a little frightening. Right on top, I’ve given it the shape … Continue reading

Posted in Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seasons and festivals, Tips, Trees, Tribal elders, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on “We plant the trees for our children in the memory of our elders who planted for us”: Trees are indispensable for India’s tribal communities

Improving Bhil children’s reading skills and comprehension: Report on the use of colourful storybooks in a range of Indian languages besides English – Madhya Pradesh

Tulika’s  storybooks were very well received by the students at Kakrana’s Rani Kajal Jeevan Shala (village school). They enjoyed reading them and even understood the stories. They made a considerable impact on both teachers and students and opened the window … Continue reading

Posted in Central region – Central Zonal Council, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Storytelling, Success story, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Improving Bhil children’s reading skills and comprehension: Report on the use of colourful storybooks in a range of Indian languages besides English – Madhya Pradesh