Category Archives: Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine

“Research on ethnomedicinal uses of a given plant can provide suggestive information on possible migrations or contacts and exchange of information between indigenous communities and in the process make valuable contributions to both medicinal as well as anthropological literature.” – Sophia Hossain, Shahnaz Rahman, Md. Tanvir Morshed, Mahbuba Haque, Sharmin Jahan, Rownak Jahan, Mohammed Rahmatullah in “Tribal Cross-Talk as an Effective Way for Ethnobotanical Knowledge Transfer – Inference from Costus specious as a Case Study” (American-Eurasian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, 15 February 2014)
https://www.academia.edu/6090970/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=2243

“Irulas are very knowledgeable about medicinal plants.” – Zai Whitaker quoted by Soma Basu in “The Naturalist” (The Hindu, 21 February 2013)
https://www.thehindu.com/life-and-style/the-naturalist/article4439332.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16322

“[Let us] use and share resources in a more sustainable and equitable manner” – Distinguished scientist M S Swaminathan in a video message on “Biodiversity”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaugUomFXIQ&feature=emb_logo
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11066

“‘Ethnomedicine’, as defined by George Foster and Barbara Anderson in their 1978 essay Medical Anthropology, is the totality of health, knowledge, values, beliefs, skills and practices of members of a society, including all the clinical and non-clinical activities that relate to their health needs. According to an estimate of the World Health Organization, approximately 88 per cent of people in developing countries rely chiefly on traditional medicines, mostly plant extracts, for their primary health care needs. [A]bout 74 per cent of the 121 biological active plant-derived compounds currently in use worldwide, have been discovered through follow-up research to verify the authenticity of information concerning the folk or ethnomedical uses of the plants.” – Dibyendu Chaudhuri , Parijat Ghosh, Temba Oraon, Vivek Sinha in “How Adivasis of one Jharkhand village are trying to preserve ethnomedicine” (Down to Earth, 22 December 2020)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/health/how-adivasis-of-one-jharkhand-village-are-trying-to-preserve-ethnomedicine-74747
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=16621

“Over all, more than 86 health-related issues are being cured utilizing ethnomedicinally important tree species. It has also been observed that the majority of youth in Tharu tribe are very less aware of their ethnic knowledge and are also not so much interested in such learning. Thus, a precise documentation of these information with traditional knowledge base from the ethnic people has great relevance for the human welfare.” – Omesh Bajpai in “Ethnomedicinal Uses of Tree Species by Tharu Tribes in the Himalayan Terai Region of India”
https://www.academia.edu/19861074
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=2267

“[The Jarawa’s] knowledge of indigenous plants, herbs, diseases, and creatures of the jungle is immense and needs no schooling. No one can really educate them further. It is we, who need to be educated because soon all this knowledge will evaporate, with the immanent danger of the extinction of the tribe.” – Anvita Abbi (Professor of Linguistics, Jawaharlal Nehru University) on Survival International
https://www.notprimitive.in
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22274

“Irulas are specialists in traditional herbal medicine and healing practices. Irula vaidyars, mostly women, practice traditional healing systems, which use over 320 medicinal herbs. They treat several new-age diseases with a high success rate. People around the world realize that traditional healing practices must have a place in modern medicine. The Irula Tribal Women’s Welfare Society (ITWWS), established in 1986, focuses on this traditional science. A centre with training facilities and a medicinal garden has been established.” – “Irula’s tribal secrets unraveled” (Times of India, 29 March 2005)
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/Irulas-tribal-secrets-unraveled/articleshow/1064853.cms
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23336

“The plant diversity of western Madhya Pradesh is reducing at the fast rate due to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental degradation. [B]etter management and protection are important for the conservation of plant diversity in the region and also for the benefit of indigenous tribes of the state.” – Inventory of ethnobotanicals and other systematic procedures for regional conservation of medicinal and sacred plants (Article, 2015)
http://www.worldcat.org/title/inventory-of-ethnobotanicals-and-other-systematic-procedures-for-regional-conservation-of-medicinal-and-sacred-plants/oclc/5790792440&referer=brief_results
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=19510

Jackfruit and indigenous knowledge: The Kaani tribal community of Kanyakumari forests – Tamil Nadu

RELEVANCE OF INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICES RELATED TO JACKFRUIT, WITH REFERENCE TO THE KAANI INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF KANYAKUMARI FORESTS Photos and text by the late Davidson Sargunam (Environmental Educator, Nagercoil, Kanyakumari District) Abstract: The Kaani tribal community resides in 48 … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Resources, Revival of traditions, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Trees, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Jackfruit and indigenous knowledge: The Kaani tribal community of Kanyakumari forests – Tamil Nadu

Indira Gandhi National Tribal University Amarkantak – Madhya Pradesh

The tribal people are rich in cultural heritage and skill of art and craft but they are still marginalized in respect to higher education as well as in other walks of life. Now in the present age of globalization the … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Democracy, eBook eJournal ePaper, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Narmada, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rural poverty, Tribal identity, Women | Comments Off on Indira Gandhi National Tribal University Amarkantak – Madhya Pradesh

Ethnomedicinal plants to cure skin diseases, poison bites, wounds and rheumatism: Traditional knowledge of Kaani tribals in the Tirunelveli hills (Kanyakumari) – Tamil Nadu

Costus speciosus (J. Koenig) Sm. (Costaceae) has long been considered an important medicinal plant in the Indian sub-continent and other countries of the world. The plant has been reported to have a wide array of ethnomedicinal uses [see Table 1: Ethnomedicinal uses]. … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Customs, eBook eJournal ePaper, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Names and communities, Networking, Quotes, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Tagged | Comments Off on Ethnomedicinal plants to cure skin diseases, poison bites, wounds and rheumatism: Traditional knowledge of Kaani tribals in the Tirunelveli hills (Kanyakumari) – Tamil Nadu

Giving Irula healing practices a place in modern medicine: A new source of livelihood for “one among the six oldest Adivasi tribes” – Puducherry & Tamil Nadu

The term Irula means being capable of finding one’s path in dark forests, according to an Irula myth | Read the full report in the Times of India here >> Born in nature’s lap, Irulas share a symbiotic relationship with Mother Earth. They … Continue reading

Posted in Community facilities, Customs, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Social conventions, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Tribal identity, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Giving Irula healing practices a place in modern medicine: A new source of livelihood for “one among the six oldest Adivasi tribes” – Puducherry & Tamil Nadu

ePaper | “Great relevance for the human welfare”: Traditional knowledge of ethnic people & sustainable utilization of plant resources – Himalayan region

The present investigation aimed at documenting medicinally important species of trees usedby Tharu tribe in the Himalayan Terai region of India. Out of 204 tree species belonging to 143 genera and 50 families reported in this study, uses of 148 … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Biodiversity, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, eBook eJournal ePaper, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Northern region – Northern Zonal Council, Quotes, Trees, Tribal elders | Tagged | Comments Off on ePaper | “Great relevance for the human welfare”: Traditional knowledge of ethnic people & sustainable utilization of plant resources – Himalayan region