Category Archives: Tribal culture worldwide

“There are around 370 million indigenous peoples worldwide, living across 90 countries and representing 5000 diverse cultures. They make up less than 5 per cent of humanity, yet represent around 15 per cent of the world’s poorest people. Two thirds of the world’s indigenous peoples live in Asia and the Pacific. They include groups often referred to as tribal peoples, hill tribes, adivasis, janajati, orang asli, aboriginal or native. Indigenous peoples make significant contributions to humanity’s cultural, intellectual and economic wealth. Across Asia and the Pacific, they are sharing essential knowledge and skills in conservation and the sustainable use of land, forests and natural resources – key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.” – Unicef in “The rights of indigenous peoples must be protected and respected”
https://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday/pdf/IDWIP%20Joint%20Statement%20FINAL.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=31852

“Tribal cultures the world over are intricately linked with the forests they live in. The story, or should wie call it the ‘history’ of modern civilization, is largely one of the taming and destroying the great forests of the world and the innumerable tribal communities that lived therein. […] Vices like alcoholism were introduced; the addiction is now used by the settlers to exploit resources from the forests.” – Pankaj Sekhsaria in Islands in Flux: The Andaman and Nicobar Story (Harper Litmus, 2017), pp. 5-7
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=26863

“We can take action in our own daily lives, to uphold the rights that protect us all and thereby promote the kinship of all human beings.” – Human Rights Day 10 December – United Nations
www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25720

“The tribal world and the tribal way is complete in itself.” – Mahasweta Devi (quoted by Gopalkrishna Gandhi in “Swearing by Mahasweta”, The Hindu, 6 August 2016)
https://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/Swearing-by-Mahasweta/article14556890.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24902

“[R]ivers run through Navajo lands but the water is diverted to golf courses in Phoenix […] while natives lack legal rights to the water and can’t even get plumbing to wash their hands.” – Janene Yazzie, a Navajo community organizer, explained to her interlocutor from the New York Times quoted by Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “Coronavirus in Native American Communities: The Charade of ‘Thanksgiving'”
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/11/22/coronavirus-in-native-american-communities-the-charade-of-thanksgiving/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7629

“Indigenous people across North America depend on Native media outlets for essential information about their communities and tribal affairs. These newspapers, newsletters, magazines, radio and television broadcasts as well as online publications are often produced in places that otherwise lack a reliable source of timely, accurate and contextual coverage of what impacts their daily lives. Indigenous media, however, does more than distribute news. It serves as a community forum that can help reinforce cultural values and languages. Ultimately, it holds the potential to reaffirm an Indigenous community’s identity.” – Bryan Pollard (Cherokee Nation) in “More than News: Indigenous media empowers native voices and communities” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22744

“[N]ative people are – through our strength, through our resilience, through our creativity – forcing the question: what kind of country do we want to be? And might we want to privilege our virtues and our values over our baser impulses.” – Book review “A New History of Native Americans Responds to ‘Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee’” (New York Times, 20 January 2020)
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/20/books/review/david-treuer-heartbeat-wounded-knee.html
https://www.indiantribalheritage.org/?p=27370

“They do so not just for themselves but for the larger good of the country and the ecological health of the world”: In support of a syllabus reflecting Adivasi knowledge systems and ways of life

KISS is a boarding school exclusively for Adivasi children based in Bhubaneswar. Founder Achyuta Samanta is the Biju Janata Dal (BJD) Lok Sabha MP from Kandhamal, Odisha. KISS houses about 30,000 girls and boys of different Adivasi communities from Odisha, … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Commentary, Eastern region, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Press snippets, Rural poverty, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Tagged , | Comments Off on “They do so not just for themselves but for the larger good of the country and the ecological health of the world”: In support of a syllabus reflecting Adivasi knowledge systems and ways of life

Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

Read the full article by Prof. Andrew B. Smith >> The name ‘Hottentot’, or its Afrikaans shortening ‘Hotnot’, became a disparaging term for people of colour at the Cape. Today we refer to the aboriginal herders of the Cape by the … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Archaeology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Gandhian social movement, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Quotes, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

“Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?”: Questions debated among members of 565 recognized American Indian tribes

by Dennis Zotigh January 26, 2011 | Read the full post in Beyond FAQ: Let’s talk >> My answer? There are many definitions of who is an Indian. As a starting point, “Indian” is a misguided label that spread through Europe … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, FAQ, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Museum collections - general, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Websites by tribal communities | Comments Off on “Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?”: Questions debated among members of 565 recognized American Indian tribes

Wastewater snow would ruin a mountain considered sacred – Flagstaff (USA)

[R]ivers run through Navajo lands but the water is diverted to golf courses in Phoenix […] while natives lack legal rights to the water and can’t even get plumbing to wash their hands. Source: Janene Yazzie, a Navajo community organizer, … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary, Customs, Ecology and environment, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets, Quotes, Tourism, Tribal culture worldwide, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Wastewater snow would ruin a mountain considered sacred – Flagstaff (USA)

Social inclusion by making education appropriate to children’s cultural context: A comparison between in India and Brazil

To read the full article, click here >> Higher education can be used for the social and economic mobility of underprivileged sections. This is achieved usually by providing admission to a set of students from these sections in universities and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Success story, Tips, Tribal culture worldwide | Tagged | Comments Off on Social inclusion by making education appropriate to children’s cultural context: A comparison between in India and Brazil