Category Archives: Tribal culture worldwide

“I carry my life experiences with me everywhere I go. It’s those experiences that give me hope for the future. If an Indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as Secretary of the Interior, our country holds promise for everyone.” – Deb Haaland quoted in “Reactions From Indian Country to Deb Haaland’s Confirmation as Secretary of the Interior” [USA] (National Museum of the American Indian, 18 March 2021)
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2021/03/18/reactions-indian-country-deb-haalands-confirmation-secretary-interior/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4540

“There are around 370 million indigenous peoples worldwide, living across 90 countries and representing 5000 diverse cultures. They make up less than 5 per cent of humanity, yet represent around 15 per cent of the world’s poorest people. Two thirds of the world’s indigenous peoples live in Asia and the Pacific. They include groups often referred to as tribal peoples, hill tribes, adivasis, janajati, orang asli, aboriginal or native. Indigenous peoples make significant contributions to humanity’s cultural, intellectual and economic wealth. Across Asia and the Pacific, they are sharing essential knowledge and skills in conservation and the sustainable use of land, forests and natural resources – key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.” – Unicef in “The rights of indigenous peoples must be protected and respected”
https://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday/pdf/IDWIP%20Joint%20Statement%20FINAL.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=31852

“Tribal cultures the world over are intricately linked with the forests they live in. The story, or should wie call it the ‘history’ of modern civilization, is largely one of the taming and destroying the great forests of the world and the innumerable tribal communities that lived therein. […] Vices like alcoholism were introduced; the addiction is now used by the settlers to exploit resources from the forests.” – Pankaj Sekhsaria in Islands in Flux: The Andaman and Nicobar Story (Harper Litmus, 2017), pp. 5-7
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=26863

“We can take action in our own daily lives, to uphold the rights that protect us all and thereby promote the kinship of all human beings.” – Human Rights Day 10 December – United Nations
www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25720

“The tribal world and the tribal way is complete in itself.” – Mahasweta Devi quoted by Gopalkrishna Gandhi in “Swearing by Mahasweta” (The Hindu, 6 August 2016)
https://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/Swearing-by-Mahasweta/article14556890.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24902

“[R]ivers run through Navajo lands but the water is diverted to golf courses in Phoenix […] while natives lack legal rights to the water and can’t even get plumbing to wash their hands.” – Janene Yazzie (Navajo community organizer) quoted by Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “Coronavirus in Native American Communities: The Charade of ‘Thanksgiving'”
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/11/22/coronavirus-in-native-american-communities-the-charade-of-thanksgiving/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=7629

“Indigenous people across North America depend on Native media outlets for essential information about their communities and tribal affairs. These newspapers, newsletters, magazines, radio and television broadcasts as well as online publications are often produced in places that otherwise lack a reliable source of timely, accurate and contextual coverage of what impacts their daily lives. Indigenous media, however, does more than distribute news. It serves as a community forum that can help reinforce cultural values and languages. Ultimately, it holds the potential to reaffirm an Indigenous community’s identity.” – Bryan Pollard (Cherokee Nation) in “More than News: Indigenous media empowers native voices and communities” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22744

“[N]ative people are – through our strength, through our resilience, through our creativity – forcing the question: what kind of country do we want to be? And might we want to privilege our virtues and our values over our baser impulses.” – Book review “A New History of Native Americans Responds to ‘Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee’” (New York Times, 20 January 2020)
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/20/books/review/david-treuer-heartbeat-wounded-knee.html
https://www.indiantribalheritage.org/?p=27370

“The pressure that has been brought to bear upon the native people, since the cessation of armed conflict, in the attempt to force conformity of custom and habit has caused a reaction more destructive than war, and the injury has not only affected the [American] Indian, but has extended to the white population as well.” – Luther Standing Bear (who “became hereditary chief of the Oglala Sioux in 1905”) in “What the Indian Means to America”; quoted in The Mammoth Book of Native Americans: the Story of America’s original inhabitants in all its beauty, magic, truth and tragedy by Jon E. Lewis (London, 2004)
http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/784882158
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22744

“I feel that you are a part of me and I will never forget you”: Tribal elder in a travel account by historian Runoko Rashidi – Looking at India through African Eyes

As I am now in the process of completing the finishing touches on a French language collection of my essays on the African presence in Asia I find myself reviewing and evaluating the body of work that I have been … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Commentary, Customs, History, Names and communities, Networking, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Social conventions, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal elders, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on “I feel that you are a part of me and I will never forget you”: Tribal elder in a travel account by historian Runoko Rashidi – Looking at India through African Eyes

Video | Ekalavya discussed in an interview with noted Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o

Writers Talk Politics | Ngugi wa Thiong’o in conversation with Sudhanva Deshpande Commenting on Ekalavya “who ends up being disabled despite that Dhrona never really taught him – he taught himself – but even with that he is disabled so … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Economy and development, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Endangered language, Globalization, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Modernity, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Storytelling, Topics and issues, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Video | Ekalavya discussed in an interview with noted Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o

Adivasi art “A Disappearing World” – Gandhi Foundation (London)

The exhibition, “A Disappearing World: Ancient Traditions Under Threat in Tribal India”, opened at the Brunei Gallery at SOAS on April 13 and will run until June 25. Seminars are also being held to discuss the suffering of the tribals. … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Globalization, Health and nutrition, Misconceptions, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Social conventions, Tribal culture worldwide, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Adivasi art “A Disappearing World” – Gandhi Foundation (London)

The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

Golden Orb Web Spider, Nephila maculata, Giant Wood Spider World distribution: Tropical areas from Africa, India, China, Japan across Southeast Asia to Northern Australia and the South Pacific islands. Webs of steel: The Golden Orb Web Spider is not the … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Biodiversity, Commentary, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, History, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

eBook | The No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples

This guide looks beyond the exotic images tracing the story of different indigenous people from their first contact with explorers and colonizers to the present day. Much of this story is told by the indigenous people themselves and they present … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Democracy, eBook & eJournal, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on eBook | The No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples