Category Archives: Misconceptions

“We are so much more than that. We follow a tradition rich in music, dance and love.” – Swarnalatha, who now runs an NGO that works for the upliftment for people of her tribal Irula community (known for their snake-catching skills), quoted in “Irulas much more than a community of snake catchers” timesofindia.indiatimes.com, 23 February 2018
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/irulas-much-more-than-a-community-of-snake-catchers/articleshow/63035204.cms
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1753

“It is wrong and does not help the tribal cause either to reduce the image of the Indian tribal society to that of destitute remnants, on the verge of dying out.” – Georg Pfeffer in Voices from the Periphery: Subalternity and Empowerment in India ( Routledge India 2012)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11961

“There are myths indicating that Asuras were made slaves by Aryans. These slave races are still struggling for annihilation of caste system. They live in abject poverty. Their latest names are ‘Scheduled Castes’, ‘Scheduled Tribes, and ‘Other Backward Castes’. They are yet to know about ‘human rights’. The fact is that aboriginals were enslaved and subjected to inhuman treatment through centuries. […] Students of history and anthropology have found numerous instances recorded in all prehistoric and established history of India, of a glowing past of this ancient tribe [known as Kolis, Koris and Kols] and more is being uncovered as research continues. ” – “Koli, Kori, Kol – Aboriginal tribes of India” by Bhushan on MEGHnet (1 January 2011), based on three publications written in Gujarati
https://www.meghnet.in/2011/01/kolikori-of-india-we-call-them.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=2918

“The nation-state’s changing definition of the ‘tribal’ is informed by certain stereotypes or prejudices, by preserving the tribal identity, in an implicit manner, as being ‘barbaric’ and ‘uncivilised’. The tribal worldview has never been taken cognizance of, while working out the definition of ‘tribe’ and, instead, there is imposition of certain state-sanctioned identity whereby the tribal’s identity-crisis is magnified.” – Shreya Jessica Dhan in “Defining the ‘Tribe’ in State Discourse: From Adivasi and Scheduled Tribe to Indigenous Peoples” (conference paper summary)
Report for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative organised by The Department of English & Outreach Programme Jamia Millia Islamia (New Delhi, 27-28 February 2017)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23073

“If Adivasis were to start writing their own Discovery Of India, it would be something like this: There are those who talk of India’s “5000 year-old culture,” there are those who talk of its “timeless traditions.” If India has a timeless tradition, it is ours.” – Gail Omvedt in “Call us adivasis, please”, ADIVASI, Special issue, The Hindu, 16 July 2000
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=26645

“Aparna Vaidik’s [book] My Son’s Inheritance goes deeper into Indian history and culture, and shows that instead of being a recent phenomenon, violence, physical and psychic, has been endemic to the Indian socio-polity since ages. […] Vaidik locates this violence in communal enmities between the Hindus and the minorities, particularly Muslims, which often validates itself as retributive justice. Deep psychic violence also operated, the author reminds us, among Hindus themselves. Many Indian Muslims and Christians, we are asked to remember, were Hindus of the lower castes, or ‘non-Aryan’ tribals, who converted out of Hinduism because of the torture of untouchability and ostracisation.” – Book review by Suparna Banerjee (The Hindu, 1 August 2020)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-reviews/my-sons-inheritance-review-a-culture-of-violence/article32237271.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?page_id=7592

Malayalam poetry to hitherto unexpressed human conditions: “The city’s late discovery of the forest” – Kerala

S Joseph, who introduced Malayalam poetry to hitherto unexpressed human conditions (Meenkaran, Mesthri, Kotta, Identity Card, Chila Irunda Idangal, Aana, Maruku, Pengalude Bible) with very ordinary, pared down words, has wandered through life’s mean streets to reach where he is today. Indeed, … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Education and literacy, Games and leisure time, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Poetry, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Storytelling, Tourism, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Malayalam poetry to hitherto unexpressed human conditions: “The city’s late discovery of the forest” – Kerala

Tip | Learn more about India’s endangered languages: Information and reports from a variety of sources

Find all posts with information relating to this issue under the Category “Endangered language”; or click here >> Papri Paul | Feb 21, 2017  | To read the full article, click here >> Kolami, Koya, Gondi, Kuvi, Kui, Yerukala, Savara, Parji, … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Commentary, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Press snippets, Rural poverty, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | Learn more about India’s endangered languages: Information and reports from a variety of sources

Santals and Santiniketan: Rabindranath’s concept of raising everyday life on to a higher level – West Bengal

It is well-known that Rabindranath Tagore harboured a special affection for the Santhals in the villages around Santiniketan. He saw in their life a special beauty. They combine the tilling of the earth as farmers with poetry, songs and dance. … Continue reading

Posted in Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Eastern region, Education and literacy, History, Maps, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tourism, Websites by tribal communities | Tagged | Comments Off on Santals and Santiniketan: Rabindranath’s concept of raising everyday life on to a higher level – West Bengal

Tagore’s commitment to Santal villages near Santiketan – UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Keeping Rabindranath’s ideas in mind, Surendranath Kar prepared the architectural plan and Nandalal Bose [>>Wikipedia] prepared the visual perspective based on the Borobudur style. The entire outside wall was decorated with beautiful relief work by Kala-Bhavana students under the guidance … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Economy and development, Education and literacy, ePub, History, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Tagore and rural culture, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Tagore’s commitment to Santal villages near Santiketan – UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Social inclusion by making education appropriate to children’s cultural context: A comparison between in India and Brazil

To read the full article, click here >> Higher education can be used for the social and economic mobility of underprivileged sections. This is achieved usually by providing admission to a set of students from these sections in universities and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Success story, Tips, Tribal culture worldwide | Tagged | Comments Off on Social inclusion by making education appropriate to children’s cultural context: A comparison between in India and Brazil