Category Archives: Success story

“As local and indigenous groups across the tropics demonstrate and exemplify sustainable development, the Equator Prize shines a spotlight on their efforts by celebrating them on an international stage.” – Equator Initiative of the United Nations which recognizes outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity Global Programe on Nature for Development
https://www.equatorinitiative.org/equator-prize/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=46483

“Demarcation around the boundaries by red flags or statues of gods or goddesses have been erected in these forests to provide a place to put votive offerings which ultimately give protection to these forests in the form of social conservation. Sharing stories that make use of overlaps with indigenous beliefs may, therefore, be a valuable approach in conservation education and wider conservation communication.” – Nazir A. Pala, Ajeet K. Neg and N.P. Todaria in “The Religious, Social and Cultural Significance of Forest Landscapes in Uttarakhand Himalaya, India” (International Journal of Conservation Science, Vol. 5, Issue 2, April-June 2014)
https://www.academia.edu/32265911
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24271

“These women are doing it every day, and how!” – Jovita Aranha on the Halpati community of Gujarat whose entrepreneurial journey ended exploitation without financial help from anybody; in “Of Spice & Spirit” (The Better India, 3 July 2018)
https://www.thebetterindia.com/148422/spice-saumya-omer-gujarat-tribe/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=25808

“Birsa’s life [1875–1900] was driven by poverty, but he still set a powerful example for the youth to emulate by giving more to society than what is taken.” – Ramya in “Remembering Birsa Munda: A Tribal Folk Hero And Freedom Fighter” (Outlook, 14 November 2020)
https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/opinion-remembering-birsa-munda-a-tribal-folk-hero-and-freedom-fighter/364269
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=14270

“Rural India’s diversity is well known. Yet the fact that more than 833 million people live in India’s villages, speak over 780 languages, and use 86 different scripts should make us pause to consider the cultural vastness of an India we urbanites know so little about. […]
PARI [People’s Archive of Rural India] is not only archiving invaluable materials about rural India, but also developing a cadre of knowledgeable reporters who can report from rural India about its realities. This digital archive has already received some significant awards for its work [and] seeks to continue its efforts to push the borders of digital multimedia and take journalism, arts, crafts, and literature out of the hands of corporations and hand it back to people.” – Jael Silliman in “Voices from the countryside” (The Telegraph, 12 November 2016)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21398

“The relative backwardness of scheduled tribes may not disappear through the overall development of a state and that may require special efforts. […] However, the life of Scheduled Tribes in certain parts of India is relatively better.” – V. Santhakumar, Azim Premji University in: “It is possible to have a better life for Scheduled Tribes in India!” (Economics in Action, 4 May 2018)
https://vsanthakumar.wordpress.com
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=24803

“We need that biodiversity to survive.” – Julia Watson, architect and assistant professor at Columbia University, whose work revolves around nature-based technologies of indigenous knowledge in “The ingenious living bridges of India” by Zinara Rathnayake (BBC, 18th November 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20211117-how-indias-living-bridges-could-transform-architecture
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=18841

“[Dr. Boro] Baski, who holds a doctorate in education and a master’s in social work from Viswa Bharati University, says he is happy being an educator. He has become a strong voice of the community not just in India but elsewhere, writing articles and books, and representing his community at conferences.” – Rosemary Marandi in “The Indian school where Indigenous children are never outsiders” (Aljazeera.com Education, 10 February 2020)
https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/indian-school-indigenous-children-outsiders-200128131128144.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=34790

Towards better and healthier education for all tribal children: Pioneering ‘bag- free schools’ in Wayanad – Kerala

Kozhikode: A school in Wayanad, where majority of students hail from tribal and other economically weaker sections, has set a model by doing away with school bags. While lugging heavy school bags has been a daily burden to students elsewhere, … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood and children, Education and literacy, Organizations, Press snippets, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Wayanad | Comments Off on Towards better and healthier education for all tribal children: Pioneering ‘bag- free schools’ in Wayanad – Kerala

Jackfruit and indigenous knowledge: The Kaani tribal community of Kanyakumari forests – Tamil Nadu

RELEVANCE OF INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICES RELATED TO JACKFRUIT, WITH REFERENCE TO THE KAANI INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF KANYAKUMARI FORESTS Photos and text by the late Davidson Sargunam (Environmental Educator, Nagercoil, Kanyakumari District) Abstract: The Kaani tribal community resides in 48 … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Resources, Revival of traditions, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Trees, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Jackfruit and indigenous knowledge: The Kaani tribal community of Kanyakumari forests – Tamil Nadu

Giving Irula healing practices a place in modern medicine: A new source of livelihood for “one among the six oldest Adivasi tribes” – Puducherry & Tamil Nadu

The term Irula means being capable of finding one’s path in dark forests, according to an Irula myth | Read the full report in the Times of India here >> Born in nature’s lap, Irulas share a symbiotic relationship with Mother Earth. They … Continue reading

Posted in Community facilities, Customs, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Ethnobotany & ethnomedicine, Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Social conventions, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Tribal identity, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Giving Irula healing practices a place in modern medicine: A new source of livelihood for “one among the six oldest Adivasi tribes” – Puducherry & Tamil Nadu

“Irulas are very knowledgeable about medicinal plants” : Interview with Zai Whitaker, Director of the Irula Tribal Women’s Welfare Society – Tamil Nadu

The ITWWS is a women’s community-based development organization established in 1986. It was founded with the aim of protecting natural resources, empowering Irula women and using the Irula tribal knowledge of forest resources for economic prosperity. The organization started with … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Success story, Trees, Websites by tribal communities, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on “Irulas are very knowledgeable about medicinal plants” : Interview with Zai Whitaker, Director of the Irula Tribal Women’s Welfare Society – Tamil Nadu

“Fire in our Hearts”: Award winning tribal documentary – Thane/New York

A documentary film made by fifteen year-old Jayshree Janu Kharpade, a tribal girl from Wada taluka of Thane district, has won an award in the Asian American Film Festival held in New York recently [in 2012]. Jayashree, who studies in … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood and children, Education and literacy, Film, Globalization, Media portrayal, Organizations, Press snippets, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on “Fire in our Hearts”: Award winning tribal documentary – Thane/New York