Category Archives: Media portrayal

“[W]e live in a world of rapid development in the media [and] everyone has different influences from where they live and change in different directions.” – Santali poet, scholar and translator Ivy Imogene Hansdak interviewed by Norwegian writer and filmmaker Audun Nedrelid (The Johar Journal, Vol. II, January-June 2021)
https://joharjournal.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Volume-II-January-June-2021.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=35277

“I would like the media to be more responsive to the needs of the poorest people, and less single-minded in their coverage of the world of glitzy entertainment and shining business opportunities. The most vibrant media in the world is so silent on the needs and predicaments of the poorest.” – Nobel Awardee Amartya Sen (quoted in The Hindu, 1 February 2014)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-authors/jaipur-diary/article5643002.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13755

“75 per cent of the population did not make news. […] We need peoples’ movements around Health Justice, Food Justice, and more – some inspiring ones already exist, but are marginalised in corporate media coverage.” – P. Sainath (founder of PARI “People’s Archive of Rural India”) in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org, 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20921

“PARI is not only archiving invaluable materials about rural India, but also developing a cadre of knowledgeable reporters who can report from rural India about its realities. This digital archive has already received some significant awards for its work, including the Praful Bidwai Memorial Award (June, 2016). PARI seeks to ‘continue its efforts to push the borders of digital multimedia and take journalism, arts, crafts, and literature out of the hands of corporations and hand it back to people.” – Jael Silliman in “Voices from the countryside” by (The Telegraph, 12 November 2016)
https://www.telegraphindia.com/1161112/jsp/opinion/story_118705.jsp
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21398

“Although deprivation so defined is a huge part of contemporary Indian reality both in the countryside and in cities, the mainstream media do not generally give it informed, sustained coverage.” –  Asian College of Journalism: “Covering Deprivation” (course-related information)
https://www.asianmedia.org.in/acj/programme/covering-deprivation/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“Touring ten drought-stricken states in India transformed the acclaimed journalist Palagummi Sainath – showing him a devastating situation mostly ignored by his fellow journalists. ‘I felt that if the Indian Press was covering the top 5 percent, I should cover the bottom percent.’ – A conversation with Saint Francis Xavier University’s Coady Chair in Social Justice for 2015” (CBC radio podcast May 27, 2016)
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/imprisoned-by-profit-media-democracy-1.3601228
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23847

“[L]et us recognise that there there is a manic irrationality that is being carefully seeded in Indian society today and that hate-filled words have an impact on the rights and well-being of all.” – Va­sund­hara Sir­nate Dren­nan (political scientist and journalist) on Mass indoctrination in “Haridwar’s hubris of hate must be stopped” (The Hindu, 30 December 2021)
https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/haridwars-hubris-of-hate-must-be-stopped/article38066548.ece
https://www.thehindu.com
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“[T]he key for Native media to succeed is for it to connect to its cultural roots.” – James R. Mountain (owner of the San Ildefonso Pueblo community’s newspaper in New Mexico) in “More than News: Indigenous media empowers native voices and communities” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22744

“[T]here have been constant press freedom violations [with] calls for the journalists concerned to be murdered.” – 2020 World Press Freedom Index by Reporters without borders
https://rsf.org/en/india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“In the 2020 World Press Freedom Index, India slipped a further two notches and now ranks a lowly 142, lower than even Myanmar which is ruled by a military junta.” – Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “Emergency in India, Faux and Real” (26 June 2020)
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/06/26/emergency-in-india-faux-and-real/

“The Indian authorities’ response to protests has focused on discrediting peaceful protesters, harassing critics of the government, and prosecuting those reporting on the events.” – Meenakshi Ganguly (South Asia director at Human Rights Watch) quoted by Soutik Biswas (BBC News, 4 February 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-55906345
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11721

“It’s time for our nations to have a voice”: A place for young leaders to share their stories and to show that they are contemporary citizens – United States of America

by Rae Paoletta 8/25/2015 There are 5.1 million Native Americans living in the United States right now, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Despite this, when you Google “Native Americans,” here’s what comes up: There are barely any photos of … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Literature - fiction, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Video resources - external, Websites by tribal communities | Comments Off on “It’s time for our nations to have a voice”: A place for young leaders to share their stories and to show that they are contemporary citizens – United States of America

Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Director: Sunanda Bhat | Producer: Songline FilmsGenre: Documentary | Produced In: 2012 | Story Teller’s Country: India Synopsis: The film interweaves contemporary narratives with an ancient tribal creation myth to explore the effects of a rapidly changing landscape on lives and … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Childhood, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Film, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tourism, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women | Comments Off on Video | Synopsis: “Have you seen the arana?” Documentary by Sunanda Bhat – Kerala

Cultural values of “the world’s largest tribal population”: Focus on crafts, linguistic diversity and the missing link in India’s development story – Akshara

India is a colourful country comprising a staggering variety of cultures and communities. Each section has its own needs and requirements and among all, we tend to forget the most sidelined community – the tribals. […] India has the world’s … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Crafts and visual arts, Education and literacy, Gandhian social movement, Globalization, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Tribal culture worldwide | Comments Off on Cultural values of “the world’s largest tribal population”: Focus on crafts, linguistic diversity and the missing link in India’s development story – Akshara

Justice, social, economic and political equality for all citizens: Ramachandra Guha on safeguards for minorities, backward and tribal areas enshrined in the Indian Constitution

This essay was first published in the Economic and Political Weekly (August 11, 2007) under the title, “Adivasis, Naxalites, And Indian Democracy” and is republished here with the author’s permission as it – unfortunately – remains as relevant today. […] … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Constitution and Supreme Court, Democracy, Economy and development, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Women | Comments Off on Justice, social, economic and political equality for all citizens: Ramachandra Guha on safeguards for minorities, backward and tribal areas enshrined in the Indian Constitution

“Kocharethi calls upon us to ethically engage with it, to question our complicity” – First novel by an Adivasi in Kerala

To read the full book review, click here >> Narayan, Kerala’s first tribal novelist, avoids romanticising his milieu. Kocharethi is about the hidden poetry of marginal lives… The temptation to exoticise cultures that have not been commodified yet must be … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Childhood, Colonial policies, Customs, Education and literacy, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature - fiction, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTG), Press snippets, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on “Kocharethi calls upon us to ethically engage with it, to question our complicity” – First novel by an Adivasi in Kerala