Category Archives: Media portrayal

“I would like the media to be more responsive to the needs of the poorest people, and less single-minded in their coverage of the world of glitzy entertainment and shining business opportunities. The most vibrant media in the world is so silent on the needs and predicaments of the poorest.” – Nobel Awardee Amartya Sen (quoted in The Hindu, 1 February 2014)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-authors/jaipur-diary/article5643002.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13755

“75 per cent of the population did not make news. […] We need peoples’ movements around Health Justice, Food Justice, and more – some inspiring ones already exist, but are marginalised in corporate media coverage.” – P. Sainath (founder of PARI “People’s Archive of Rural India”) in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20921

“Touring ten drought-stricken states in India transformed the acclaimed journalist Palagummi Sainath – showing him a devastating situation mostly ignored by his fellow journalists. ‘I felt that if the Indian Press was covering the top 5 percent, I should cover the bottom percent.’ – A conversation with Saint Francis Xavier University’s Coady Chair in Social Justice for 2015” (CBC radio podcast May 27, 2016)
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/imprisoned-by-profit-media-democracy-1.3601228
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23847

“PARI is not only archiving invaluable materials about rural India, but also developing a cadre of knowledgeable reporters who can report from rural India about its realities. This digital archive has already received some significant awards for its work, including the Praful Bidwai Memorial Award (June, 2016). PARI seeks to ‘continue its efforts to push the borders of digital multimedia and take journalism, arts, crafts, and literature out of the hands of corporations and hand it back to people.” – Jael Silliman in “Voices from the countryside” by (The Telegraph, 12 November 2016)
https://www.telegraphindia.com/1161112/jsp/opinion/story_118705.jsp
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21398

“’Deprivation’ refers to the inability of individuals in a society to achieve basic human functionings. Among these are the ability to live a long and healthy life free from avoidable disease and hunger, and the opportunity to be educated and to have access to resources needed for a socially acceptable standard of living […] Although deprivation so defined is a huge part of contemporary Indian reality both in the countryside and in cities, the mainstream media do not generally give it informed, sustained coverage.” –  Asian College of Journalism: “Covering Deprivation” (course-related information)
https://www.asianmedia.org.in/acj/programme/covering-deprivation/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“The Indian authorities’ response to protests has focused on discrediting peaceful protesters, harassing critics of the government, and prosecuting those reporting on the events.” – Meenakshi Ganguly (South Asia director at Human Rights Watch) quoted by Soutik Biswas (BBC News, 4 February 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-55906345
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11721

“[T]here have been constant press freedom violations [with] calls for the journalists concerned to be murdered.” – Reporters without borders (ranking India in its 2020 World Press Freedom Index, down to 142 from 140 in 2019)
https://rsf.org/en/india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“In the 2020 World Press Freedom Index, India slipped a further two notches and now ranks a lowly 142, lower than even Myanmar which is ruled by a military junta.” – Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “Emergency in India, Faux and Real” (26 June 2020)
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/06/26/emergency-in-india-faux-and-real/

“[T]he key for Native media to succeed is for it to connect to its cultural roots.” – James R. Mountain (owner of the San Ildefonso Pueblo community’s newspaper in New Mexico) in “More than News: Indigenous media empowers native voices and communities” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org

“Journalist and photojournalists are professional storytellers who objectively pursue and report the facts. However, everyone’s life experiences inevitably shape what one sees and hears. [T]he field of photojournalism is reinventing itself to respond to the growing need to give members of traditionally underreported groups more of a voice in how their story is told.”- From the Editors in “On the front lines: Journalism may never be so needed – or so endangered” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org

The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

By J.J. Roy Burman, Mainstream, Vol XLVII, No 32, July 25, 2009 In India the term ‘Adivasi’ has gained immense popularity in the last few decades to identify the tribes. This term is more commonly brought to use by the NGO … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Constitution and Supreme Court, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council | Comments Off on The term ‘Adivasi’: Neither an equivalent to ‘Tribe’ nor used in the Indian Constitution – Mainstream Weekly

A master of traditional Kurumba painting techniques: Krishnan of Velaricombai village (Nilgiris) – Tamil Nadu

Making do without blue in the Blue Mountains Olivia Waring,  April 4, 2017 | To view these and more photos in larger size and read the full article, click here >> Krishnan of Velaricombai village in the Nilgiris attempts to breathe life into … Continue reading

Posted in Audio resources - external, Bees and honey, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Media portrayal, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Regions of India, Resources, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Seasons and festivals, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity, Video resources - external, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on A master of traditional Kurumba painting techniques: Krishnan of Velaricombai village (Nilgiris) – Tamil Nadu

India’s tribal, folk and devotional music: Secular and ceremonial songs – An overview

“Tribal, Folk and Devotional Music”by NA Jairazbhoy in AL Basham (ed.). A Cultural History of India. London: Oxford University Press, 1975, pp. 234-237. Excerpt from Chapter XVI Music (pp. 212-242): Classical music is the most refined and sophisticated music to be … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Audio resources - external, Cultural heritage, Customs, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Musicology, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Performing arts, Quotes, Seasons and festivals, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Storytelling, Tribal identity, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on India’s tribal, folk and devotional music: Secular and ceremonial songs – An overview

Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

Adivasi people: proud not primitive | Read the full article >> […] Defining what’s special about India’s adivasi or indigenous people is complicated. People, mostly anthropologists and human rights defenders, who know adivasis and have worked closely with them, also tend … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Assimilation, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Nilgiri, Organizations, Poetry, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Topics and issues, Tourism, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Adivasis’ world view: A truly sustainable lifestyle – Comment

Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) & The Fourth World Journal (FWJ)

We are a global community of activist scholars advancing the rights of indigenous peoples through the application of traditional knowledge. Our mission: Activist scholars advancing the rights of indigenous peoples worldwide. The Fourth World Journal (FWJ) is the world’s leading … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Commentary, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ethnobotany, Globalization, Health and nutrition, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) & The Fourth World Journal (FWJ)