Category Archives: Media portrayal

“Although deprivation so defined is a huge part of contemporary Indian reality both in the countryside and in cities, the mainstream media do not generally give it informed, sustained coverage.” –  Asian College of Journalism: “Covering Deprivation” (course-related information)
https://www.asianmedia.org.in/acj/programme/covering-deprivation/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“[L]et us recognise that there there is a manic irrationality that is being carefully seeded in Indian society today and that hate-filled words have an impact on the rights and well-being of all.” – Va­sund­hara Sir­nate Dren­nan (political scientist and journalist) in “Mass indoctrination” (The Hindu, 30 December 2021)
https://www.thehindu.com
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“I would like the media to be more responsive to the needs of the poorest people, and less single-minded in their coverage of the world of glitzy entertainment and shining business opportunities. The most vibrant media in the world is so silent on the needs and predicaments of the poorest.” – Nobel Awardee Amartya Sen (quoted in The Hindu, 1 February 2014)
https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-authors/jaipur-diary/article5643002.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13755

“[T]he key for Native media to succeed is for it to connect to its cultural roots.” – James R. Mountain (owner of the San Ildefonso Pueblo community’s newspaper in New Mexico) in “More than News: Indigenous media empowers native voices and communities” (American Indian Magazine, Smithsonian, Summer 2020)
www.AmericanIndianMagazine.org
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=22744

“75 per cent of the population did not make news. […] We need peoples’ movements around Health Justice, Food Justice, and more – some inspiring ones already exist, but are marginalised in corporate media coverage.” – P. Sainath (founder of PARI “People’s Archive of Rural India”) in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20921

“Touring ten drought-stricken states in India transformed the acclaimed journalist Palagummi Sainath – showing him a devastating situation mostly ignored by his fellow journalists. ‘I felt that if the Indian Press was covering the top 5 percent, I should cover the bottom percent.’ – A conversation with Saint Francis Xavier University’s Coady Chair in Social Justice for 2015” (CBC radio podcast May 27, 2016)
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/imprisoned-by-profit-media-democracy-1.3601228
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23847

“PARI is not only archiving invaluable materials about rural India, but also developing a cadre of knowledgeable reporters who can report from rural India about its realities. This digital archive has already received some significant awards for its work, including the Praful Bidwai Memorial Award (June, 2016). PARI seeks to ‘continue its efforts to push the borders of digital multimedia and take journalism, arts, crafts, and literature out of the hands of corporations and hand it back to people.” – Jael Silliman in “Voices from the countryside” by (The Telegraph, 12 November 2016)
https://www.telegraphindia.com/1161112/jsp/opinion/story_118705.jsp
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21398

“[T]here have been constant press freedom violations [with] calls for the journalists concerned to be murdered.” – 2020 World Press Freedom Index by Reporters without borders
https://rsf.org/en/india
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23343

“In the 2020 World Press Freedom Index, India slipped a further two notches and now ranks a lowly 142, lower than even Myanmar which is ruled by a military junta.” – Vinay Lal (Professor of History & Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles UCLA) in “Emergency in India, Faux and Real” (26 June 2020)
https://vinaylal.wordpress.com/2020/06/26/emergency-in-india-faux-and-real/

“The Indian authorities’ response to protests has focused on discrediting peaceful protesters, harassing critics of the government, and prosecuting those reporting on the events.” – Meenakshi Ganguly (South Asia director at Human Rights Watch) quoted by Soutik Biswas (BBC News, 4 February 2021)
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-55906345
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=11721

Proper coverage of “deprivation”: Ethical considerations for students of Indian journalism

Asian College of Journalism: Covering Deprivation During the first semester, all students take a required course— the only one of its kind taught by a journalism school anywhere in the world — Covering Deprivation. Deprivation” refers to the inability of … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adverse inclusion, Childhood and children, Commentary, Democracy, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Storytelling, Video resources - external, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Proper coverage of “deprivation”: Ethical considerations for students of Indian journalism

The Adivasi way of life: Utopian or worth emulating by ‘mainstream’ society? – An ongoing debate

Anyone who has had some meaningful interaction with India’s indigenous or adivasi people, cannot fail to be touched by the encounter. There is a directness in them, an absence of artifice or guile, an almost childlike innocence, born of simplicity … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Assimilation, Bees and honey, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, FAQ, Fashion and design, Health and nutrition, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Press snippets, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal elders, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on The Adivasi way of life: Utopian or worth emulating by ‘mainstream’ society? – An ongoing debate

Documentary on the matrilineal Khasi Tribe: A social order where women are dignified and not discriminated against – Meghalaya

By Kamayani Bali Mahabal | To read the full article with images, click here >> Filmmaker Aditya Seth demystifies the traditions and culture of the matrilineal Khasi tribe of Meghalaya, as they discover their place in a fast-changing world. […] In his latest 60-minute … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Customs, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Film, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Names and communities, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Social conventions, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal elders, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Documentary on the matrilineal Khasi Tribe: A social order where women are dignified and not discriminated against – Meghalaya

Tribal influence on Indian and international fashion – Chhattisgarh & Seven Sister States

While fashion is a reliable reflector of change, it is also the marker of a continuity of control exerted by the affluent and the powerful. Desmond L. Kharmawphlang G. Badaiasuk Lyngdoh Nonglait Wandashisha Rynjah in Globalization: The Khasi Perspective, p. 13 … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Crafts and visual arts, Dress and ornaments, Economy and development, Fashion and design, Health and nutrition, Media portrayal, Museum collections - general, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Tourism, Tribal culture worldwide, Websites by tribal communities, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Tribal influence on Indian and international fashion – Chhattisgarh & Seven Sister States

Audio | Birsa Munda (1875-1900), the young, charismatic healer: “The only Adivasi whose portrait hangs in the Indian Parliament”

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles Birsa Munda, the young, charismatic healer who led his tribal community in revolt against the British and whose life, more than a century after his death, poses the question: ‘Who owns India?’ | Listen to the … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Audio resources - external, Colonial policies, Democracy, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Media portrayal, Names and communities, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling | Tagged | Comments Off on Audio | Birsa Munda (1875-1900), the young, charismatic healer: “The only Adivasi whose portrait hangs in the Indian Parliament”