Category Archives: Sacred grove

“Sacred groves are patches of forest, water bodies, grasslands considered to be inhabited by gods and hence, strictly prohibited from resource extraction. – “Role of Sacred Groves and their current status in adivasi society” (Adivasi.net Newsletters, No. 31 2011)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=1987

“Sacred natural sites may well be some of the last strongholds for building resilient networks of connected landscapes.” – Manjusha Misra (School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal, International Journal of Environmental Studies), reviewing Sacred Natural Sites: Conserving Nature and Culture (Routledge, 2010)
https://www.routledge.com/Sacred-Natural-Sites-Conserving-Nature-and-Culture/Verschuuren-Wild-Mcneely-Oviedo/p/book/9781849711678
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=37222

“When women from the household would work at the loom, their designs would emerge from their world view, understanding of oral traditions, folktales, the surrounding sacred groves, and more.” – Meeta Deka (Professor and former Head, Dept. of History at Gauhati University), quoted by Avantika Bhuyan (livemint.com, 1 December 2017)
https://www.livemint.com/Leisure/FR23TDZqwz1hDYOlB5mRSN/Folklore-myths-and-handloom.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691

“Our kaavus (sacred grounds) are central to our culture. But many have been encroached upon and disappeared. AMS has done a survey of all Kaavus and burial grounds and is petitioning the government to officially recognize them.” – Adivasi Munnetra Sangam (photo caption, 2017 calendar)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21811

“One of the finest examples of traditional practices in India based on religious faith which has made a profound contribution to nature conservation has been the maintenance of certain patches of land or forests as ‘sacred groves’.” – Dr S.M. Nair (former Director of the National Museum of Natural History)
Report of the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel
https://www.thehindu.com/multimedia/archive/01092/wg-23052012_partI_1092699a.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20948

“By the impact of globalization, free trade and the communication revolution non-tribesmen are gradually invading the indigenous areas and intrude into their spiritual realms by introduction of their Gods, Goddesses and deities. They systematically and surreptitiously exploit their economy and devalue the indigenous culture. They clandestinely deprive their traditional spiritual culture, spiritual aspects and fervor making them vulnerable to external oppressive, exploitative forces.” – S Davidson Sargunam & S Suja in “Eco-Spirituality and Climate Change with Reference to the Kaani Tribe of Kanyakumari Forests” (Tribal Foundation Nagercoil, 4 July 2015)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=18372

“Many small towns across India also have sacred groves. The kaavus of Kerala are managed by the government, temple trusts, local community, or even privately. […] These kaavus are tiny oases rich in floral and faunal biodiversity, many less than an acre in area. They contain rare trees such as the south Indian kanak champa, which is categorized as vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. They also host a number of birds, bats, butterflies and insects. […] To stand amidst the towering trees draped with creepers, allowing little sunlight even at noon, lit by a lone lamp under the snake shrine, can leave anyone with a sense of awe. The character of these kaavus is, however, changing. Some are being used as garbage dumps by city dwellers, while others are converted to modern temple structures with the trees eventually surrounded by concrete or even cut down.” – Harini Nagendra & Seema Mundoli in Cities and Canopies: Trees in Indian Cities (Penguin Random House India 2019), p. 109
https://penguin.co.in/book/uncategorized/cities-and-canopies/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=31803

Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

There’s much to learn from the positive contributions made by tribal communities on a daily basis. To start with, let’s learn from insiders and others who have dedicated their lives to ensuring that a precious heritage will continue to make … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Biodiversity, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Endangered language, Ethnobotany, FAQ, Gandhian social movement, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Multi-lingual education, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG), Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Success story, Tagore and rural culture, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tip | “How to address misconceptions on tribal customs and culture in the classroom?” – Ideas and practices worth sharing among peers and students

Tribal Politics – adivasi culture, language, and religion in Encyclopedia of India

Tribal Politics The “tribal” peoples or adivasis of India, according to the 2001 census, constitute roughly 8.1 percent of the country’s population, some 83,6 million people, classified under 461 different communities. They occupy a belt stretching from the Bhil regions … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Bastar, Colonial policies, De- and re-tribalisation, Ecology and environment, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nilgiri, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Sacred grove, Tribal identity, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Tribal Politics – adivasi culture, language, and religion in Encyclopedia of India

Slideshow | Baha Parab, the Santal Flower Festival “celebrating Man’s Communion with Nature” – West Bengal

Baha Parab (Celebrating Man’s Communion with Nature)by Dr. Boro Baski, Bishnubati Baha Parab 28th Year of Adibasi Baha Parab (Santal Flower Festival), organized by Ghosaldanga Bishnubati Adibasi Trust, successfully celebrated with various eventful programmes on 9thMarch 2017. BAHA means ‘flower’ in Santali … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Games and leisure time, Health and nutrition, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Performing arts, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Resources, Sacred grove, Seasons and festivals, Success story, Tribal elders | Tagged | Comments Off on Slideshow | Baha Parab, the Santal Flower Festival “celebrating Man’s Communion with Nature” – West Bengal

Slideshow | Baha festival spring festival: Ushering in new hope and new life – West Bengal

Photos © Elisabeth den Otter 2012 The Santals call themselves Hor Hopon, meaning child or children of human beings. It is only in the mouth of others that they are regionally called Santal, SanthaI, Saotar, and Sotar. [p. 7] The festivals … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Customs, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, History, Literature and bibliographies, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Sacred grove, Seasons and festivals, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Slideshow | Baha festival spring festival: Ushering in new hope and new life – West Bengal

Video | Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest: A documentary on forest Rights by Purabi Bose – Rajasthan

Forest Rights: Jung Jungle aur Jungle ke logo ka. Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest, Rajasthan, India. A short video documentary (14mins) film ‘Forest Rights’ is produced and directed by Purabi Bose based on research field work data collection. … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Biodiversity, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, History, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Western region –  Western Zonal Council, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | Voices of Bhil tribal from semi-arid forest: A documentary on forest Rights by Purabi Bose – Rajasthan