Category Archives: De- and re-tribalisation

“The guiding principle is that no person who was not a Scheduled Tribe by birth will be deemed to be a member of Scheduled Tribe merely because he or she has married a person belonging to a Scheduled Tribe. Similarly a person who is a member of a Scheduled Tribe would continue to be a member of that Scheduled Tribe, even after his or her marriage with a person who does not belong to a Scheduled Tribes. However, status of the children born out of such marriages would depend on the particular caste status of the father.” – National Commission for Scheduled Tribes
https://www.ncst.gov.in
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=33998

Mahatma Gandhi interested in promoting the Adivasi culture – Adivasi Sanskriti Sangam in New Delhi

The Hindu, New Delhi, November 22, 2011 To foster a better understanding of the unique lifestyle of tribal communities, Gandhi Smriti and Darshan Samiti is hosting a three-day cultural event of Adivasi communities at Gandhi Darshan opposite Raj Ghat here beginning … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Cultural heritage, De- and re-tribalisation, Dress and ornaments, Economy and development, Gandhian social movement, Government of India, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rural poverty, Tribal identity | Leave a comment

Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

Read the full article by Prof. Andrew B. Smith >> The name ‘Hottentot’, or its Afrikaans shortening ‘Hotnot’, became a disparaging term for people of colour at the Cape. Today we refer to the aboriginal herders of the Cape by the … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Archaeology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Gandhian social movement, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes, Quotes, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Revival of interest in aboriginal history: The “Khoe”, descendants of herders who introduced pottery 2000 years ago – Southern Africa

Tribal culture a living example of the Gandhian concept of trusteeship – Human Ecology by Lachman Khubchandani

Tribal heritage needs to be respected on its own terms. It will be disastrous to aim at absorbing tribal communities into the ‘mainstream’. Nehru had forewarned us against following such ‘interventionist’ policies, ‘There is no point to make them a … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi / Adibasi, Anthropology, Assimilation, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, ePub, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Tribal identity | Comments Off on Tribal culture a living example of the Gandhian concept of trusteeship – Human Ecology by Lachman Khubchandani

“Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?”: Questions debated among members of 565 recognized American Indian tribes

by Dennis Zotigh January 26, 2011 | Read the full post in Beyond FAQ: Let’s talk >> My answer? There are many definitions of who is an Indian. As a starting point, “Indian” is a misguided label that spread through Europe … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, FAQ, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Museum collections - general, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Websites by tribal communities | Comments Off on “Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?”: Questions debated among members of 565 recognized American Indian tribes

Forest dwellers in early India – myths and ecology in historical perspective

By Romila Thapar, Emeritus Professor of History, Jawaharlal Nehru University  The hunt introduces us to the forest dwellers. These tended to be either creatures of the imagination such as the raksasas who are abundant, or else humans with supernatural faculties. Raksasas have … Continue reading

Posted in Bees and honey, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Ecology and environment, Elephant, History, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Resources, Sacred grove, Storytelling, Trees, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Forest dwellers in early India – myths and ecology in historical perspective