Category Archives: Ecology and environment

“As we are looking for ways of sustainable development, these [tribal] groups can teach us lessons in sustainable development.” – M. Venkaiah Naidu (Vice President of India) in the First Foundation Day Lecture of the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (NCST) titled “Constitution and Tribes” (Press Information Bureau, 19 February 2019)
https://ncst.nic.in/sites/default/files/2019/Media/2.pdf
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=36256

“This is all of our country. This is our mother. You’ve heard the earth referred to [as] ‘Mother Earth.’ It’s difficult to not feel obligated to protect this land and I feel that every Indigenous person in this country understands that.” – Debra Haaland, a 35th-generation New Mexican from the Pueblo of Laguna, who became the first Native American ever to be confirmed as a Cabinet secretary quoted by Cara Korte (CBC News, 15 March 15 2021)
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/deb-haaland-native-american-confirmation-interior-secretary/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4540

“Nature is a reward in itself. It is there, to be understood, to be lived and loved. And in its way it gives us everything – the bounty and goodness of the earth, the sea, the sky. Food, water, the air we breathe. All the things we take for granted. […] Nature gives. And takes away. And gives again.” – Ruskin Bond in The Book of Nature
https://penguin.co.in/book/the-book-of-nature/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5036

“We are on borrowed time, because we are not looking after our soil properly’. You can call it neo-liberalisation, corporatisation, fertilising or short-sighted irrigation policy, but, ultimately what is happening is that the soil is losing all its nourishment. Any civilisation that doesn’t understand this basic truth is going to face the grave danger of just not being able to survive any more. The day after this conversation, we were at a meeting in Jalgaon and there experts were talking about greater productivity through more chemicals into the soil and how we needed to increase the number of crops we grow. What they do not understand is that only four companies dominate 75 per cent of the global trade in grains and only 17 plant species (out of 3,00,000) are providing the human race 90 per cent of its food.” – Playwright Ramu Ramanathan interviewed by Dipanita Nath in “I know people who have chosen to be silent, some out of fear and others just out of being deadened” (Indian Express, 28 October 2020)
https://indianexpress.com/article/cities/pune/i-know-people-who-have-chosen-to-be-silent-some-out-of-fear-and-others-just-out-of-being-deadened-6902500/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=5576

“Movements of farmers and farm labourers […] are headed for serious trouble if they do not factor in the problems of climate change (which have already devastated agriculture in India); if they do not locate themselves in, and link their battles to, an agroecological approach.” – P. Sainath in “We Didn’t Bleed Him Enough”: When Normal is the Problem (counterpunch.org , 12 August 2020, first published in Frontline magazine)
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/08/12/we-didnt-bleed-him-enough-when-normal-is-the-problem/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20419

“Indians are truly rooted in an ethos of living in harmony with their land. There was a time when the Indian subcontinent was carpeted in green… watered by glacial rivers, blessed by rolling hills and productive grasslands, lush rainforests and wave-kissed mangroves. All creatures, great and small, found niches here and thrived. Varied cultures were spawned and people in awe of nature lived by its rules. This happy situation has changed. The wondrous green has long-disappeared – plundered and looted first by invaders and colonists and then by those who took freedom as license to outdo the colonisers in the plunder of natural India. Today what little remains is being systematically eroded by a population caught in the crossroads of a development paradigm borrowed from the industrial North that systematically devastated colonies for centuries.” – Lakshmy Raman and Bittu Sahgal in “Daft National Policy 2018” (Sanctuary Nature Foundation)
https://sanctuarynaturefoundation.org/article/daft-national-policy-2018
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=17557

“We are currently facing a crisis that threatens not only the survival of our civilisation and humans as a species, but that of life on our planet as a whole. […] ‘Buen vivir’ provides a unique opportunity to devise new ways of living collectively” – Mateo Martínez Abarca in “The Climate Crisis: South African and Global Democratic Eco-Socialist Alternatives (2018)
https://www.academia.edu/38962736/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=28966

“We can do things differently to reinvent growth without pollution. But only if we have the courage to think differently.” – Sunita Narain in “India’s twin environmental challenges” (Down To Earth, 15 December 2013)
https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/indias-twin-environmental-challenges-42835
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=13490

India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Gujarat

“The Tribal Development Department of Gujarat has objectives to improve the Scheduled Tribes’ (ST) quality of life by increasing and ensuring their access to education, health care and income generation.” – Learn more | Govt., NGOs and universities | People’s Archive … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Democracy, eBook & eJournal, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Museum collections - India, Narmada, Organizations, Regions of India, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story, Tips, Tourism, Western region –  Western Zonal Council | Comments Off on India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Gujarat

Environmental history and what makes for a civilization – Romila Thapar

A brief excerpt from an interview by PUSHPA CHARI, The Hindu, March 31, 2012 Today, environmental history or understanding history through environmental change, is gaining ground. Have you built it into your work? Environmental history is being researched in a much bigger … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Bees and honey, Biodiversity, Ecology and environment, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets | Comments Off on Environmental history and what makes for a civilization – Romila Thapar

Eco-spirituality in the face of climate change: Learning from the Kaani tribe of Kanyakumari District – Tamil Nadu

ECO-SPIRITUALITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE WITH REFERENCE TO THE KAANI TRIBE OF KANYAKUMARI FORESTS S Davidson Sargunam, Tribal Foundation, 23, Cave Street, NagercoilS Suja, Associate Professor, Women’s Christian College, College Road, Chennai ABSTRACT The Kaani tribal people live in 48 Tribal … Continue reading

Posted in Biodiversity, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Globalization, Health and nutrition, Homes and utensils, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rural poverty, Sacred grove, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Trees, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Eco-spirituality in the face of climate change: Learning from the Kaani tribe of Kanyakumari District – Tamil Nadu

“Development is invariably a form of change, but not all forms of change can be termed development”: A context for India’s tribal heritage, past and present

A useful analytical framework to study the deprivation and development of Adivasis in the larger Indian context. THE selection of papers in this volume, presented at the International Seminar on “Adivasi/Scheduled Tribe Communities in India: Development and Change” in August … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi / Adibasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Colonial policies, Commentary, Community facilities, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Rural poverty, Scheduled Tribe (ST), Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Tips, Topics and issues, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on “Development is invariably a form of change, but not all forms of change can be termed development”: A context for India’s tribal heritage, past and present

“Our country holds promise for everyone”: Deb Haaland, an Indigenous woman from humble beginnings, confirmed as Secretary of the Interior – USA

I carry my life experiences with me everywhere I go. It’s those experiences that give me hope for the future. If an Indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as Secretary of the Interior, our country holds promise for … Continue reading

Posted in Colonial policies, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, eBook & eJournal, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, eLearning, Ethnobotany, Figures, census and other statistics, Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Homes and utensils, Languages and linguistic heritage, Media portrayal, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story, Trees, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Women | Comments Off on “Our country holds promise for everyone”: Deb Haaland, an Indigenous woman from humble beginnings, confirmed as Secretary of the Interior – USA