Category Archives: Archaeology

“The existence of a unique, preAryan [sic] populace with a distinct cultural heritage and evolved literary traits has been fortified by archaeological evidence collected from the discovery of Harappa and Mohenjo-daro in the early 1920s, and further substantiated by the ongoing Keezhadi excavations in Tamil Nadu. With modern day advancements in handling fragile biodegradable material from excavation sites and also high-throughput genomic sequencing, we now understand how the Indian subcontinent was populated through waves of migration.” – Ma­nu­raj Shun­mu­ga­sun­daram in “The Dravidian movement and Aryan illusions” (The Hindu, 23 July 2022)
https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/the-dravidian-movement-and-aryan-illusions/article65672119.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=26937

“India has about 5,000 rock art sites, next only to Australia and South Africa, where prehistoric people have recorded life as they saw it, in paintings, engravings and carvings. […] hollow cup-impressions created on rock surfaces using hammer stones, have also been categorised as rock art.” – T.S. Subramanian in “Discovering & deciphering rock art” (Frontline Magazine, 27 November 2015)
https://frontline.thehindu.com/arts-and-culture/heritage/discovering-amp-deciphering-rock-art/article7858593.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21555

“If the discovery [of 19 pictographs from a cave in Hampi] stands the scrutiny of experts in the field, it would mean that the Gonds living in central and southern India could have migrated from the Indus Valley civilisation.” – S. Harpal Singh in “Gonds may have migrated from Indus Valley” (The Hindu, Telangana, 16 December 2014)
Address: https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/telangana/gonds-may-have-migrated-from-indus-valley/article6698419.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20315

“The Neolithic is an important time frame for North East India given the many changes in culture that occurred during this transitional period. This shift from food procurement to food production was solely based on the local domestication of plants and animals, rather than knowledge imported from neighbouring regions. Hence, the popular term ‘Neolithic Revolution’ aptly suits this stage.” – Dhrijyoti Kalita reviewing Prehistory and Archaeology of Northeast India by Manjil Hazarika (Scroll.in, 3 March 2019)
https://scroll.in/article/915071/this-essential-book-on-the-prehistory-of-no
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=45657

“Historians have often claimed that large-scale town life in India first developed in the Greater Magadha region of the Gangetic basin. This was during the ‘second urbanisation’ phase, believed to have begun around the mid-first millennium BCE. (The ‘first urbanisation phase’ refers to the rise of the Harappan or Indus Valley Civilisation, lasting from 2600 BCE to 1900 BCE.) Tamil Nadu was thought to have urbanised at this scale only by the third century BCE. The findings at Keeladi push that date back significantly. Now, it is arguable that this part of the subcontinent urbanised around the same time as the Gangetic plains.” – Sowmiya Ashok in “The Dig” (Fiftytwo.in, 2 April 2021)
https://fiftytwo.in/story/the-dig/
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=38630

“A spectacular feature of the site [near Mavadaippu tribal village in Tamil Nadu] is that the rock surface is an admixture of ancient rock art and contemporary tribal paintings, showing continuity of tradition as it were.” – K.T. Gandhirajan quoted by T.S. Subramanian in “Ancient rock art dating back to 1500 B.C. found in Tamil Nadu” (The Hindu, 28 September 2016)
https://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/Ancient-rock-art-dating-back-to-1500-B.C.-found-in-Tamil-Nadu/article14769223.ece
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21555

“Rock art is a term used to define several types of artistic examples in the form of paintings, bruising, pecking, and engravings etc; in the bare rock surfaces of caves, rock shelters and isolated rock boulders, executed by our ancestors. […] Since majority of this form of rock art occurs in caves and rock shelters and which cannot be moved from place to place, it is also known as ‘parietal art’. […] In the history of mankind no work of fine art other than rock art has such a wide distribution lasting for such a long time.” – Kunja Bihari Barik in “Rock art in Orissa an ethnoarchaeological study” (PhD thesis, Sambalpur University, 2008), p. 2
https://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/handle/10603/202775
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21555

Learn more about tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh

When it comes to protein and calorie counts, milk and bananas do not match up to eggs, particularly for [Madhya Pradesh], where development indicators are among India’s worst: Almost 51% of children under five years of age are underweight, and … Continue reading

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Western India’s cotton-growing and -dyeing technologies traced to Indus Valley civilization – Western region

The western region consists of the desert states of Gujarat and Rajasthan as well as Haryana, western Uttar Pradesh and western Madhya Pradesh. […] The region is home to a wide variety of people with different religions and cultures, most … Continue reading

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“Rethinking tribals”: Articles on Adivasi culture in Folio Special issue

Ever since the Portuguese travel writers and missionaries decided to describe the vast variety of ethnic and occupational groups and sects of the Indian subcontinent in terms of “caste” and “tribe”, the terms have stuck to society as long-worn masks … Continue reading

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Tip | Appreciating India’s tribal cultural heritage: Regions rich in archaeologic discoveries (from Mohenjo Daro and the Indus Valley civilization to the present day)

Archaeological evidence The existence of a unique, preAryan populace with a distinct cultural heritage and evolved literary traits has been fortified by archaeological evidence collected from the discovery of Harappa and Mohenjo-daro in the early 1920s, and further substantiated by … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Government of India, History, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Museum collections - India, Narmada, Northern region – Northern Zonal Council, Organizations, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Tips, Tribal identity, Western region –  Western Zonal Council, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Tip | Appreciating India’s tribal cultural heritage: Regions rich in archaeologic discoveries (from Mohenjo Daro and the Indus Valley civilization to the present day)

Slideshow | Ancient rock art and modern graffiti: Continuity of tribal tradition since 1500 B.C. – Tamil Nadu

India has about 5,000 rock art sites, next only to Australia and South Africa, where prehistoric people have recorded life as they saw it, in paintings, engravings and carvings. Finding and decoding this artistic “perception of reality” is a challenge … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Bees and honey, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Childhood, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Education and literacy, Elephant, History, Homes and utensils, Literature and bibliographies, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Storytelling, Tiger, Tribal culture worldwide, Western Ghats – Tribal heritage and ecology, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on Slideshow | Ancient rock art and modern graffiti: Continuity of tribal tradition since 1500 B.C. – Tamil Nadu