Category Archives: Crafts and visual arts

“The adventure-filled origin myth about Bhil art revolves around the thirst for rain and water conservation – important for the people living in the dry western and central parts of India. Their close interaction with the natural world finds an abiding expression in their art, called pithora. Painting is like prayer for the Bhils, and each dot in the vibrant and colourful patterns represents an ancestor whom they invoke for the well-being of all forms of life.” – Background information on an illustrated storybook (A Bhil Story)
https://www.tulikabooks.com
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=19254

“[I]n a newly independent India […] handicrafts were a source of income and pride. Not only did such skills provide a livelihood locally, but they could become a unique global export.” – Feminist writer Gloria Steinem reviewing “A Passionate Life: Writings by and on Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay” by Ellen Carol Dubois and Vinay Lal Openmagazine (7 April 2017)
https://www.openthemagazine.com/article/books/kamaladevi-chattopadhyay-the-last-teacher
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=20948

“Today, the dual onslaught of commercialization and urbanization, means that weavers are being forced to churn out designs which cater to the demands of the market, rather than those which focus on their folk traditions. However, there is now a growing movement to preserve indigenous identity, and some serious attempts are being made to revive age-old customs, rites and stories by a conscious few within society.” – Ramona Sangma quoted by Avantika Bhuyan in Livemint (1 December 2017)
https://www.livemint.com/Leisure/FR23TDZqwz1hDYOlB5mRSN/Folklore-myths-and-handloom.html
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=23691

“During our biggest festival ‘Sorhai’ there were decoration on the walls with flower designs, bird and animal figures. I saw my mother and sister drawing red and blue lines on the walls by climbing on the bamboo ladder. [C]enturies-old traditional knowledge and art of building low-cost-no-cost mud-houses and the related skills and crafts, like wall paintings die out.” – Boro Baski in “Is ‘brick house’ the only sign of development?” (translated from an article in Bengali Anandabazar Patrika, 21 July 2019)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=29829

“Tagore wanted his students to feel free despite being in the formal learning environment of a school, because he himself had dropped out of school when he found himself unable to think and felt claustrophobic within the four walls of a classroom. […] Thanks to Tagore’s legacy, Santiniketan has managed to preserve Bengal’s fast-disappearing rural crafts culture through folk markets, like the weekly Bondangaar Haat, and rural co-operatives, like Amar Kutir.” – Sanchari Pal, The Better India (31 August 2016)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=21449

“In post-independence India, two factors had an enduring influence on tribal art, bringing it out of its purely ritualistic and iconographic confines and allowing it to conquer its own contemporary artistic space — the government’s decision to promote an active “handicrafts” policy and to give paper to tribal communities, and the creation of museums where this art could be showcased. Artists were no longer circumscribed to painting the walls of their homes.” – “Magical idiom” by Vaiju Naravane (The Hindu Magazine, 10 April 2010)
https://indiantribalheritage.org/?p=4731

Video | Votive Terracotta of Molela: Cultural heritage sustained by tribal communities – Rajasthan & Gujarat

Votive terracotta painted plaques produced by the terracotta artisans of Molela is a hand modelled hollow relief of Hindu deities, especially of the neo-Vaishnava deity, Dev Narayan. Dev Narayan is accompanied by his characteristic snake symbol in the plaque. Made … Continue reading

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Learn more about tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh

When it comes to protein and calorie counts, milk and bananas do not match up to eggs, particularly for [Madhya Pradesh], where development indicators are among India’s worst: Almost 51% of children under five years of age are underweight, and … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Archaeology, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Democracy, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Ekalavya (Eklavya, Eklabya), EMR & Factory schools, Endangered language, Figures, census and other statistics, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Health and nutrition, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Multi-lingual education, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Narmada, Organizations, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, Resources, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Tips, Tourism, Women, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Learn more about tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh

Pulayar community – Kerala, Karnataka & Tamil Nadu

The Pulayar, also Pulaya, or Pulayas or Holeya or Cheramar, are one of the main social groups found in Kerala, Karnataka and in historical Tamil Nadu or Tamilakam Traditions Their marriage rituals were described by Edgar Thurston. Nowadays many of … Continue reading

Posted in Assimilation, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Names and communities, Performing arts, Quotes, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Pulayar community – Kerala, Karnataka & Tamil Nadu

Tagore’s Santiniketan, “an Abode of Learning Unlike Any in the World” – West Bengal

Sanchari Pal, The Better India, August 31, 2016 | To read the full story and view more photos in high resolution, click here >> Located about 158 km northwest of Kolkata in Bengal’s rural hinterland, Santiniketan embodies Rabindranath Tagore’s vision of … Continue reading

Posted in Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Eastern region – Eastern Zonal Council, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Globalization, History, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Performing arts, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Seasons and festivals, Social conventions, Success story, Tagore and rural culture | Tagged | Comments Off on Tagore’s Santiniketan, “an Abode of Learning Unlike Any in the World” – West Bengal

India’s living megalithic culture and rock art – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Meghalaya, Tamil Nadu & Telangana

Massive stone structures dotted across the subcontinent provide a fascinating glimpse into India’s prehistoric past […] Megaliths are spread across the Indian subcontinent, though the bulk of them are found in peninsular India, concentrated in the states of Maharashtra (mainly … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Central region – Central Zonal Council, Crafts and visual arts, Customs, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Names and communities, Seven Sister States & Sikkim – North Eastern Council, Southern region – Southern Zonal Council, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Tagged , | Comments Off on India’s living megalithic culture and rock art – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Meghalaya, Tamil Nadu & Telangana