“Fire in our Hearts”: Award winning tribal documentary – Thane/New York

A documentary film made by fifteen year-old Jayshree Janu Kharpade, a tribal girl from Wada taluka of Thane district, has won an award in the Asian American Film Festival held in New York recently [in 2012].

Jayashree, who studies in Eklavya Parivartan Vidyalaya here, made the 27-minute-long documentary- ‘Fire in our Hearts’ on the lives of the children in the brick kiln owners. […]

In 2003, when she was eight, Jayshree had to quit school. After her mother’s death, she had to tend to her three younger brothers while her father worked at a brick kiln.

In the film, which won the ‘One to Watch’ award at the festival, Jayshree documented her family and village as well as the tenacious efforts of the tribal union for the equal rights to education.

“It shows that if tribal girls are given an opportunity, they can excel. However, the sorry state is that they have been ignored by the society and it is high time we bring them into the main stream,” Vivek Pandit, chief of the Shramajivi Sanghatana said.

It was the story of the girl’s struggle that made documentary filmmaker Joyce Chopra of New York-based NGO, By Kids, approach Jayshree.

A two-member team flew down from New York in February this year and stayed for a month in the boarding school to teach Jayshree to handle the camera. After a week of lessons on how to handle the camera, the girl marched to her village in Wada to document the story of her life.

Source: Thane tribal girl’s film wins award in New York – Indian Express 13 August 2012
Address : http://www.indianexpress.com/news/thane-tribal-girls-film-wins-award-in-new-york/987719/
Date Visited: Mon Oct 15 2012 20:39:52 GMT+0200 (CEST)

“We have to write our own stories, about our issues, from our own perspectives” Abhay Xaxa, a “Fiercely Unapologetic Adivasi Scholar-Activist | Read more >>

“Cover Your Country” by PARI: Rural people speak about their lives through photos, narratives, film, and audio materials >>

Video | “I saw women working 90 per cent of the time. They did backbreaking jobs for which you need an erect spine,” says P. Sainath in Visible Work, Invisible Women: Bricks, coal and stone | RuralIndiaOnline.org >>

Find a copy in a library near you on worldcat.org >>

“The smart boy or clever girl who is deprived of the opportunity of schooling, or who goes to a school with dismal facilities (not to mention the high incidence of absentee teachers), not only loses the opportunities he or she could have had, but also adds to the massive waste of talent that is a characteristic of the life of our country.” – Nobel Awardee Amartya Sen in The Argumentative Indian (Penguin Books, 2005), p. 344

Tips: Tribal Children’s Right to Education | Find this and other books published in India | Video documentary on the Lifeworld of an Enlightened Villager | Related posts about childhood | Childrens rights: UNICEF India >>

In his play Muktadhara (The Waterfall), Tagore robustly employs this element of freedom. The play relates the story of an exploited people and their eventual release from it. [Today, when] tribal populations across India are being uprooted with impudence Tagore’s message of freedom, in all its shades, is of utmost relevance.

Bhaswati Ghosh in Freedom in Tagore’s Plays | Learn more >>

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“The recent rape of an Adivasi woman in Bengaluru was one of many incidents of suffering that workers had endured over the decades. […] As per a study on human trafficking, the state of Jharkhand has emerged as India’s trafficking hub with thousands of tribal women and girls being trafficked out of the state each year to Delhi, Punjab, Haryana and beyond [while] human traffickers are also involved in many cases of missing children.” – Rights Groups Call for Probe Into Trafficking Networks After Rape of Adivasi Migrant Worker >>

Human trafficking is a crime. To report in India, call
Shakti Vahini on +91-11-42244224+91-9582909025
or the national helpline Childline on 1098.
High susceptibility of children in tourism locations >>

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