SRISTI – institutional support to the activities of the Honey Bee Network

Kattunayakan honey harvesters Photo © Tarsh Thekaekara www.thesholatrust.org | Learn more about bees and honey on this website >>

SRISTI, setup in 1993, is a developmental voluntary organization aiming to strengthen the creativity of/at/for grassroots communities, and individual innovators. It supports eco-friendly solutions to local problems being scouted, spawned and spread by the Honey Bee Network for over 33 years. It also nurtures eco-preneurs engaged in conserving biodiversity, common property resources, cultural diversity and educational innovations. | Learn more on sristi.org >>

SRISTI was set up to provide organizational, intellectual and logistics support to the Honey Bee Network. The primary objectives while setting up the organization were: systematically documenting, disseminating and developing grassroots green innovations, providing intellectual property rights protection to grassroots innovators, working on the in situ and ex situ conservation of local biodiversity, and providing venture support to grassroots innovators. SRISTI manages the Honey Bee database of innovations, and supports the publication of the Network’s newsletter in three languages, English, Hindi and Gujarati.

Lately SRISTI has being focusing on more concerted ways of hitherto neglected domains like women’s knowledge systems, value addition through a natural product laboratory, using ICT to establish knowledge network, connecting innovators, traditional knowledge holders with the centres of formal excellence, entrepreneurs etc and innovations in education. […]

Honey Bee signifies a philosophy of discourses, which is fair, authentic and accountable. It advocates people to people learning. The ethics of knowledge extraction, its documentation, dissemination and their abstraction into theories or technologies is the central concern of the Honey Bee Network. […]

It is a model of poverty alleviation and conservation of natural resources which builds upon particular resources in which poor people are often rich i.e. their knowledge. In many cases, the insights learnt from local innovations can even extend the frontiers of modern science. In the case of herbal medicine, the studies have shown that as many as seventy four percent of the human plant derived drugs are used for the same purpose for which local communities and tribal people use these plants (Farnsworth, 1981). What modern science did was only to make the method of extraction, formulation, storage or delivery more efficient, or in some cases generate a synthetic analogue of the active compounds. […]

Source: About Us | SRISTI
Address : http://www.sristi.org/cms/en/about_us
Date Visited: Mon Jun 11 2012 20:41:24 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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India’s hidden hotbeds of invention – Anil Gupta and the Honey Bee Network on TED.com >>

“I am so happy to be able to serve the bees and the farmers by becoming patron of the European initiative to save the bees and the farmers […]. Without them there would be no pollination. Without them there would be no future food. And the small farmers are the primary source of food.” Watch her video appeal dated 28 February 2020 here:
“Vandana Shiva supports our ECI” | Video | “We need to learn from tribals” >>

The “Save Bees and Farmers!” European Citizens’ Initiative alliance is a growing network of currently over 140 environmental NGOs, farmer and beekeeper organisations, charitable foundations and scientific institutions distributed throughout the European Union, working together to reconcile agriculture, health and biodiversity.

Source: The “Save Bees and Farmers!” European Citizens’ Initiative
URL: https://www.savebeesandfarmers.eu/eng/about-us/
Date visited: 4 August 2020

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Learn more about water-related issues that affect India’s tribal communities >>
“National development and the development of tribal communities are linked to each other.” – Droupadi Murmu | Speeches by the 15th President of India >>

“Together, we must endeavour to strengthen tribal communities which are the role model in preservation of water, forest and land, and learn from their connection with nature and the surrounding environment for the sake of the entire human race.” – journalist and tribal rights activist Dayamani Barla in The Wire >>

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