Slideshow | The Food Book of four communities in the Nilgiri mountains: Gudalur Valley – Tamil Nadu

View the slideshow | ePub version | Shanthi Teacher’s classroom on PARI >>

“The British established mode of forest governance imposed restrictions on local forest-dwelling communities. In 1860, the Company withdrew all access rights for using the forests (food, fuel, medicine and selling forest products) since the forests and forest-dwelling communities provided refuge to the rebels during the Sepoy Mutiny.” – Bharat Rural Livelihoods Foundation >>

Learn more about the Forest Rights Act and its importance for ecology, biodiversity, ethnobotany and nutrition; and about the usage of Adivasi (Adibasi) in different states of India: in legal and historical records, in textbooks, scholarly papers and the media >>

Source: Research team (Sayantani Satpathi, Shambhavi Singh & Subhodeep Basu) in “Revisiting the Forest Rights Act: Status of Implementation with respect to Land Tenures and Collection of Minor Forest Produce), Bharat Rural Livelihoods Foundation (New Delhi, 12 July 2019), p. 4
URL: https://www.academia.edu/41756309
Date visited: 5 October 2o2o

Dr. Rashneh Pardiwala © Alexis Agliano Sanborn/Asia Society >>
Biodiversity fostered by tribal communities >>

The recent trend is to use exotic species for manicured lawns and gardens. This means indigenous species are losing even more space, and our local species decline with them. New lifestyle patterns are also changing things. For example, India’s urban sparrow population has dipped. Even growing up, sparrows were as common as a crow or a pigeon. But now they’ve almost disappeared. Why? For one thing, our architecture is changing, and building facades no longer offer nesting sites. Even the old grain shops, which used to have grain strewn in the road, have turned into packaged super markets. Suddenly, you have an entire species disappearing because you’ve taken away its food source, habitat, and flight path.

Source: Rashneh Pardiwala in “Why It’s Hard to ‘Change Mindsets’ on Environmental Protection Among India’s Elites”; interview on environmental education at her Centre for Environmental Research and Education (CERE) in Mumbai (Asia Blog, 27 July 2015)
URL: https://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/interview-why-its-hard-change-mindsets-environmental-protection-among-indias-elites
Date visited: 3 March 2021

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