Dance and music of the Santal community – West Bengal & Jharkhand

[…] Unlike many other tribal groups of the Indian Subcontinent, the Santals are known for preserving their native language despite waves of migrations and invasions from Dravidians, Indo-Aryans, Mughals, Europeans, and others.

Santali culture is depicted in the paintings and artworks in the walls of their houses. Local mythology includes the stories of the Santal ancestors Pilchu Haram and Pilchu Bhudi.[…]

The Santal traditionally accompany many of their dances with two drums: the Tamak’ and the Tumdak’. The flute was considered the most important Santal traditional instrument and still evokes feelings of nostalgia for many Santal. Santal dance and music traditionally revolved around Santal religious celebrations. […]

The Santal community is devoid of any caste system and there is no distinction made on the basis of birth.

Source: Santhalcommunity
Read more here: http://www.firstlightindia.org/Santhalcommunity.html
Date Visited: Wed Jul 06 2011 19:56:20 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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