eBook | Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Towards “a life free from want and fear” for every ethnic group – United Nations

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Download the illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights >> 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights remains as relevant today as it was on the day in 1948 that it was proclaimed and adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. […]

The Universal Declaration promises to all the economic, social, political, cultural and civic rights that underpin a life free from want and fear. They are not a reward for good behaviour. They are not country-specific, or particular to a certain era or social group. They are the inalienable entitlements of all people, at all times, and in all places — people of every colour, from every race and ethnic group; whether or not they are disabled; citizens or migrants; no matter their sex, their class, their caste, their creed, their age or sexual orientation. […]

Source: Illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, 2015): Foreword by the Secretary-General & Introduction by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights
URL: http://www.un.org/en/udhrbook/pdf/udhr_booklet_en_web.pdf
Date accessed: 30 May 2019

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages. | Download PDF >>

Source: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Documents/UDHR_Translations/eng.pdf
URL: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Documents/UDHR_Translations/eng.pdf
Date accessed: 30 May 2019

  • The National Human Right Commission (NHRC) describes “crimes like rape, molestation, torture, fake encounter in police custody as manifestations of a systemic failure to protect human rights”;
  • It reports that “rights of the people were violated or negligence was shown by a public servant in the prevention of such violations”; NHRC concludes:
  • “Atrocities against vulnerable sections of society – women, children, disabled and the elderly – are often compounded when they belong to the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes”; and therefore demands:
  • India must ratify the International Convention against Torture.

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