Guided tour – Part 5

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Kota celebration – Photo by Vicky Lakshmanan © 2013

India’s leading scientists are aware of the threat posed to their country’s . In  a paper called “Perceiving the Forest‘, historian Romila Thapar looks at the way people observed and wrote about the forest at different times, and to see how over time it changes:

Environmental history is being researched in a much bigger way than before. This is apparent in discussions on the decline of Harappan cities. What caused the decline? Today we know that invasions and conquest are very often really quite marginal. More likely factors could be deforestation, possible changes in climate at that time, changes in sea level and the silting up of settlements, flooding, changing river courses like that of the Satlej or the disappearance of the Hakra, and the proximity of settlements to particular ecologies.

Writer Mahasweta Devi maintains that “Indian forests, rivers and mountains owe their survival to Adivasis … the most civilised people”.

Kamaljit S. Bawa is convinced that the country needs Partnerships for sustaining life:

India is blessed with unique and an enormous amount of biodiversity that sustains many of our economic endeavours, and provides aesthetic, cultural and spiritual values. This biodiversity is declining, and this decline is threatening our survival.

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In her award winning documentary “Have you seen the arana?“, filmmaker Sunanda Bhat follows a group of tribal women concerned over the disappearance of medicinal plants from the forest. A farmer tells about his commitment to growing traditional varieties of rice organically. We gain fresh insights into shifting relations between people, knowledge systems and environment. Interwoven into contemporary narratives is an ancient tribal creation myth that traces the passage of their ancestors across this land, recalling past ways of reading and mapping the terrain.

Since the was adopted in 2012, concerned citizens want their elected officials to act more responsibly as far as India’s natural resources are concerned:

Biodiversity is under threat from a range of sources […] The question now is whether India is going to honestly identify what this underlying driver is and make a serious effort to balance the development versus nature battle. – Tarsh Thekaekara (thesholatrust.org) in The Hindu, October 17, 2012

Most importantly, laws such as the much-discussed Forest Rights Act (FRA) must be fully understood by the communities concerned.