Tiger – a national symbol of India since Indus Valley Civilisation

The Bengal tiger, or Royal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), is a subspecies of tiger native to India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan. The Bengal tiger is the most numerous of the tiger subspecies — with populations estimated at 1,411 in India, 200 in Bangladesh, 155 in Nepal and 67–81 in Bhutan.

The Bengal tiger has been a national symbol of India since about the 25th century BCE when it was displayed on the Pashupati seal of the Indus Valley Civilisation.The tiger was later the symbol of the Chola Empire from 300 CE to 1279 CE and is now designated as the official animal of India.

The most significant immediate threat to the existence of wild tiger populations is the illegal trade in poached skins and body parts between India, Nepal and China.

Source: Flora – Fauna on stamps: Animals of India–Indipex 2011
Address : https://florafaunaonstamp.blogspot.com/2011/02/animals-of-indiaindipex-2011.html
Date Visited: 19 July 2020

National Animal

The magnificent tiger, Panthera tigris is a striped animal. It has a thick yellow coat of fur with dark stripes. The combination of grace, strength, agility and enormous power has earned the tiger its pride of place as the national animal of India. Out of eight races of the species known, the Indian race, the Royal Bengal Tiger, is found throughout the country except in the north-western region and also in the neighbouring countries, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. To check the dwindling population of tigers in India, ‘Project Tiger’ was launched in April 1973. So far, 27 tiger reserves have been established in the country under this project, covering an area of 37,761 sq km.

Source: National Animal – National Symbols – Know India: National Portal of India
Address : https://india.gov.in/knowindia/national_animal.php
Date Visited: Sat Sep 03 2011 14:39:02 GMT+0200 (CEST)

A total of 18 tiger range States, distributed in five landscapes of the country would be benefitted under the Project Tiger scheme. […] The schemes would address the human wildlife conflict effectively. […] It will generate direct employment of about 30 lakh mandays annually which shall include many local tribes besides non-tribal local workforce.

Sourece: Government of India’s Umbrella Scheme of Integrated Development of Wildlife Habitats beyond 12th Plan (Press Information Bureau, 5 September 2018)
URL: https://pib.gov.in/Pressreleaseshare.aspx?PRID=1545068
Date Visited: 19 July 2020

Research the above issues with the help of Shodhganga: A reservoir of theses from universities all over India, made available under Open Access >>

When your neighbour is a tiger | People’s Archive of Rural India
People living near or within the forest in the Bandipur National Park and the Sundarbans revere as well as fear the tiger. Their proximity to tigers, leopards, crocodiles and other big animals often causes violent confrontations, but it has also inspired myths and conservation. Here are PARI’s tales from tiger territory >>

Tips for using interactive maps

  1. toggle to normal view (from reader view) should the interactive map not be displayed by your tablet, smartphone or pc browser
  2. for details and hyperlinks click on the rectangular button (left on the map’s header)
  3. scroll and click on one of the markers for information of special interest
  4. explore India’s tribal cultural heritage with the help of another interactive map >>

About website administrator

Secretary of the foundation
This entry was posted in Cultural heritage, Economy and development, Government of India, History, Nature and wildlife, Resources, Stamps, Tiger. Bookmark the permalink.